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Room L2 [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Tongue worm (Linguatula serrata) a rarely seen veterinary curiosity
Linguatula serrata is a parasite found in several parts of the world, commonly in the Middle East. It is parasite of dogs and foxes (definitive hosts), residing in nasal cavities, with a range of herbivorous species acting as intermediate hosts. The intermediate nymphal stage resides in the mesenteric lymph nodes. The adult parasite is large with females reaching up to 14 cm and males 1-2 cm. It is also a zoonosis and humans may act as definitive or intermediate host. This parasite has rarely been found in Australia (10 reports in 200 years) and is commonly thought to be nothing more than a veterinary curiosity. Recent studies in wildlife (wild dogs (dingoes and dingo/domestic dog hybrids and foxes and in livestock (cattle) have revealed this parasite is far from rare. Wildlife survey data will be presented together with data on the morphology of the adult and nymphal stages. Transmission in wildlife and the risks to infection in domestic dogs will be discussed

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Advancing the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia
This paper will discuss initiatives by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA), the objective of which is to take a lighter touch regulatory approach to product registration. The initiatives will reduce the burden on industry in complying with regulatory requirements and be proportionate to the risks being managed while continuing to deliver regulatory decisions that are timely and science-based.
The revised regulatory approach to registration consists of the following four elements:
1) The introduction of a profiling tool that will determine the appropriate level of regulatory intervention for applications. Online self-assessment may be adequate for applications requiring less regulation whereas an expert assessment tailored to each product may be required for applications posing a higher risk to humans and/or target animals.
2) The assessment of applications for product registration will take into account relevant international data, assessments, standards, and decisions, in accordance with the guiding principles of the Government Competitiveness Agenda.
3) The development of chemical monographs, risk manuals, and standards for certain product types that pose a negligible or low risk. A standard, for example, may define the chemical composition of a formulation, the target animal species for the formulated product, product claims, and labelling under which the APVMA would be satisfied to register a product. The registration of those applications that comply with the relevant standard will be fast-tracked.
4) The trialing of contestability of efficacy assessments that transfer efficacy assessments from the APVMA to private sector providers. If the current pilot study demonstrates advantages to the APVMA and the applicant, further consultation will be conducted as to the contestability of future efficacy assessments.
When fully implemented, these initiatives will help to advance the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Philip Reeves

Dr Philip Reeves

Chief Regulatory Scientist, Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority
Dr Phil Reeves is the APVMA Chief Scientist. He is responsible for ensuring the APVMA’s regulatory science frameworks and standards continue to meet appropriate national and international standards. Through engagement with national and international scientific and regulatory networks... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Use of animal based measures for assessing farm-animal welfare
The first reports published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) tried to identify environment and management indicators of poor welfare, because this approach corresponded to a quick and easy assessment. Consequently most European legislation on farm animal welfare was supported on these resource-based indicators. However, good management and access to an adequate environment do not necessarily result in a high standard of welfare. More recently the advantages of measuring welfare through animal-based indicators – the way in which the animal itself responds and copes with its surroundings – have become evident. In this paper we will review the process of testing animal-based indicators for validity (Does it measure what we think it measures? Does it relate to the animals experience?), reliability (Would it be recorded in the same way by more than one assessor? Would the same assessor record it in the same way on more than one occasion?) and feasibility (Can it be measured on farm in a reasonable manner?)

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Welfare quality and AWIN welfare assessment protocols for ruminants
Welfare assessment requires a multidimensional approach corresponding to a multi-criteria evaluation. To develop a practical tool that delivers an overall view of welfare, different specific indicators need to be integrated into an assessment protocol. In 2009 the Welfare Quality project re-elaborated the concept of the traditional “Five Freedoms” and defined four main areas of concern (“Welfare Principles”) – Good feeding; Good housing; Good health; Appropriate behaviour expression – which were then split into twelve criteria each of which corresponded to a key welfare dimension. Criteria should be independent of each other and form an exhaustive, but minimal list. Two large European projects have recently studied and integrated welfare indicators to produce assessment protocols for most production animal species. The Welfare Quality (2009) project addressed both dairy and beef cattle and the AWIN project produced protocols for sheep and goats (2015). In this paper we will present the different protocols and discuss the applicability and constrains encountered when applying them

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Animal welfare and profitable farming
Increasingly, consumers expect animal welfare to be part of the core of farm animal production and will avoid products which they view as not fulfilling minimum conditions. Examples of this pressure and of consumers withdrawing their support for certain types of production are available worldwide. So, farming counter to public concern is nowadays unsustainable. However, assessing and ratifying welfare has shown to be not only essential in these certification schemes for consumers and in legislation enforcement, but also a useful tool in clinical, management and economical decision making. Measurement is a fundamental component of management and supervision. It is obvious that animals with poor welfare have suboptimal performances or demand artificial ways of maintaining health and production (e.g. antimicrobials). By assessing welfare through a well built and comprehensive protocol, it is possible to early identify sub-clinical disease, health risk factors and reasons for low yield, reduced growth or high mortality. It is also an excellent way to discern and monitor disease prevalence, such as lameness. In this paper we will present examples of good welfare as a way to guarantee animal health and farm profit

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Genotypic and phenotypic resistance and resilience of sheep to gastro-intestinal parasitism
Selection for genetic resistance and resilience to gastro-intestinal worms is established practice in the Australian sheep industry. Genetic resistance is mediated by host immune response which has been shown to be a significant contributor to reduced growth rate in scourworm infections in sheep. Several questions of practical importance arise:  Can  selection for resistance inadvertently reduce productivity of meat sheep ?: Are there differences in the cost of the immune response between lambs that differ in their potential to limit worm infection (resistance)?: If so, is the cost influenced by co-selection for increased growth rate in the presence of infection (resilience)?  There are two mechanisms to address these questions, namely review of industry genetic and productivity data, and structured experimentation in known genetic lines of sheep. This presentation draws the available information together, defines undisputable knowledge, attempts to identify questionable assumptions, and assembles thoughts on what we need to know to underpin ongoing efficient selection for resistance and resilience to worm infections in sheep.

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Carmichael

Dr Ian Carmichael graduated in Veterinary Science from Melbourne University in 1967 and was awarded a DVSc from the University of Pretoria, South Africa in 1990. He worked in Africa and Asia for two decades as a specialist research scientist in government and corporate educational... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Triage, treat and then what? Bushfire, wildlife and SAVEM.
Bushfires are increasing in Australia and worsening globally within temporal and geographic parameters: the corollary of climate change and increasing severe weather events. Bushfire is news when people, property, infrastructure and animals find themselves in its path. Superimpose on this a shrinking “off” season, the demands of year-round bushfire preparedness, and the migration of wildlife into idyllic human populated habitat. Combine that with 43 degrees and strong northerly winds: the quintessential Australian summer. South Australian Veterinary Emergency Management (SAVEM Inc) was formed in 2009 after the Victorian Black Saturday bushfires devastated that State in just such a scenario. Since then we have responded to bushfires every year, the largest being the Sampson Flat fire in January 2015, and the Pinery fire of November the same year. SAVEM works with all species of animals, and wildlife pose particular challenges. Veterinarians are in a privileged and unique professional position to join the ranks of Emergency responders – bringing clinical, problem solving and counseling skills. But a fireground is a very long way from “business as usual”, and without Emergency Management training a fireground can be a fatal place even after the fire is contained or controlled. This presentation by the SAVEM Coordinator will describe the principles and processes of effective practical Emergency Management as it pertains to operational case studies of recent South Australian fires. It will highlight confronting issues and difficult questions regarding management of wildlife involved in those fires; some lessons learned and why veterinary science has an important place at the table in effectively extending knowledge of natural hazard impacts and consequences

Speakers
avatar for Dr Rachel Westcott

Dr Rachel Westcott

Coordinator, SAVEM Inc.
Dr Rachel Westcott is a veterinarian in her own private practice in Adelaide’s south. She graduated from Murdoch University in 1999 with first class honours, and is now a PhD candidate with Western Sydney University and the Bushfire & Natural Hazards CRC. In 2009, Rachel founded... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Veterinarians in aquaculture
VThe Aquaculture industry in Australia is a growing field, and the demand for seafood domestically and internationally is projected to rise in tonnage. The Australian aquaculture industry currently includes the production of oysters, mussels, prawns, barramundi, kingfish, silver perch (and other native fish), trout, salmon and Southern Bluefin tuna as commercial species. The aquaculture systems used to grow these species include recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS), flow-through, semi-flow through, sea-cage systems and ponds. These diverse systems require tailored health and biosecurity management strategies to suit the needs of each individual business/farm. To support growing levels of production, health management of stock is necessary to optimise performance and survival, which feeds into profitability of businesses. Health management is seen to be more holistic and encompasses not only disease control and prevention but also welfare management; and research and development. Veterinarians hold an essential future in this field, but support is needed for post-graduate training and continuing education. Attaining the right people in the field will support a culture of continuous improvement to strive for best-practice health management across the industry. Most importantly, an understanding the roles of other professionals in the field is necessary for collaboration and successful implementation of health and welfare systems

Speakers
DC

Dr Christine Huynh

After graduating from University of Sydney, Christine entered the Aquaculture field. Her passion for Aquatic Animal Health and Production medicine has been nurtured by being involved with Aquaculture. Christine spent 3.5 years working in private practice, consulting for aquaculture... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Do animals know what’s good for them? - Aligning animal preferences and their biological needs in welfare studies
As animal welfare has become an increasingly important issue, there has been a focus on what constitutes animal welfare and how we can measure it. One approach has been to try to measure how the animal itself perceives its situation. Another approach has been to measure the biological function of the animal, through changes in physiology or health. Animal preferences may provide some insight into how an animal perceives its situation through indicating which of two or more choices it desires. However, the question is often asked – ‘Is this particular preferred choice good for them?’ This paper examines what we know about the links between animal preferences and their biological needs

Speakers
avatar for Professor Andrew Fisher

Professor Andrew Fisher

Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria
Andrew Fisher worked in practice in Colac in Victoria and in northern England. After a PhD in beef cattle health in Dublin, he worked for five years with AgResearch in New Zealand, conducting research aimed at improving dairy cow management. In 2002, Andrew joined the CSIRO, and researched... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

One health, culling [wildlife] and the common good
One Health recognizes that the health of humans and non-human animals are interlinked through our shared environment. One Health differs from traditional approaches to zoonotic risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread valorisation and adoption of One Health, culling domestic animals and wildlife remains a key component of institutional responses to animal-borne infectious disease. Using the threats posed by Hendra virus [HeV], bovine tuberculosis [bTB] and highly pathogenic avian influenza [HPAI] viruses as case examples, I explore how culling and other standard control measures for animal-borne infectious disease might be justified as part of One Health approaches. The purpose is to further nascent discussions about the ethical dimensions of One Health and begin to describe the principles around which a public health agenda that truly seeks to co-promote human and nonhuman health could potentially begin to be implemented

Speakers
DC

Dr Chris Degeling

Dr Chris Degeling is a health social scientist, philosopher, and veterinarian who works in the social studies and ethics of public health. At the completion of his PhD (2009) he undertook a further 18 months training in qualitative research methods and population health intervention... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Calcium oxalate nephrosis in koalas
Calcium oxalate nephrosis is a common presentation of lethargic koalas in Adelaide. An inexpensive, patient-size and reliable method of determining the severity of the disease was sought to guide the decision to euthanase. Blood urea was measured, using dry-chemistry whole blood testing, Azostix® was used. This was correlated to elevated blood urea determined by chemical analysis using Roche. Ultrasound was used to determine the presence of crystals were present in the medulla of the kidney and demonstrated the presence of area of cortical necrosis. Urea levels higher than 25mg/dl correlated with presence of crystals in the kidney and evidence of renal damage and high levels confirm presence of this condition

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 16:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30 ACST

Western Quolls: native animal reintroductions, a veterinary DIY guide
Australia’s has one of the worst mammal extinction rates in the world with around 30% of our non-bat, mammal species classified as threatened. Many programs have, therefore sprung up to address such losses, both locally and more widespread, to re-establish populations or even just to evaluate the status quo of species abundance in an area. The vast majority of these projects are concerned with managing populations or assemblages of populations (landscapes), as opposed to an individual animal focus, and therefore the role of ecologist/biologist holds a substantial sway. Unfortunately, in my experience, many ecologist are initially resistant to veterinary involvement for reasons that can only be speculated upon: professional pride, perceived costs, past experiences or misunderstandings with individual vets, or the isolation of the project site. There are many avenues in a reintroduction program where veterinary input can enhance the project: the disease risk assessment and pre-release testing or surveillance, the ethics application and the species recovery plan preparations, and the clinical support for diseased or injured animals with necropsy investigation of any mortalities. Using our experiences with the Western Quoll reintroduction program in the Flinders Ranges (SA) I hope to demonstrate how from a veterinary perspective we can continue to build this relationship with ecologists for the benefit of the current and future, hopefully collaborative, projects. I will also elaborate on the benefits for the individual vet professionally and generally as a team building exercise for their practice, and lastly what we, at Zoos SA, offer in the way of support and mentoring to local clinics that are willing to become involved is such projects

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Smith

Ian Smith is the senior veterinarian at Zoos SA based at Adelaide Zoo for the last five years, and at Monarto Zoo for the seven year before that. He has also worked at Werribee Zoo and at the zoos of the London Zoological Society. He is the proprietor of “ZooVet” which provides... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:30 - 18:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Saving teeth - Alternatives to extraction
Alternative treatment options will be offered and discussed to extraction of teeth. Including options to treat periodontal disease, fractured with and without pulp exposure. And options for linguoversion of mandibular canine teeth

Speakers
DC

David Clarke

Dr David Clarke completed his dental residency at the Dallas Dental Animal Hospital in Dallas, Texas, he is both a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College and a Fellow of the American Academy of Veterinary Dentistry. Dr David is registered as a Specialist in Veterinary... Read More →
KH

Kirsten Hailstone

Adelaide Animal Emergency & Referral Centre
Dr Kirsten Hailstone BVMS, BSc. Kirsten Hailstone has recently credentialed with the American Veterinary Dental College under the mentorship of Dr David Clarke BVSc, Dipl. AVDC, FAVD,MANZCVS. She works at Adelaide Animal Emergency and Referral Centre amongst a passionate group of... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Raising your dental IQ
From difficult extractions to restoratives that don't stick, many a frustrating moment can be had in the dental operatory. Case studies will be used to glean tips and techniques to improve dental procedures and lessen failures

Speakers
DC

David Clarke

Dr David Clarke completed his dental residency at the Dallas Dental Animal Hospital in Dallas, Texas, he is both a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College and a Fellow of the American Academy of Veterinary Dentistry. Dr David is registered as a Specialist in Veterinary... Read More →
KH

Kirsten Hailstone

Adelaide Animal Emergency & Referral Centre
Dr Kirsten Hailstone BVMS, BSc. Kirsten Hailstone has recently credentialed with the American Veterinary Dental College under the mentorship of Dr David Clarke BVSc, Dipl. AVDC, FAVD,MANZCVS. She works at Adelaide Animal Emergency and Referral Centre amongst a passionate group of... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Dental disease - antibiotics and analgesics, getting the balance right
Do we rely too heavily on antibiotics when treating oral and dental related disease conditions? Conversely, do we overlook the importance of appropriate analgesia? Too often we reach for antibiotics when a patient presents with oral or dental related disease. This presentation aims at exploring and understanding the indications for appropriate antibiotic use when treating dental and oral diseases in companion animals. We will look at the underlying disease processes and current research and recommendations in human and animal fields in order to provide an understanding as to when and why antibiotics are or are not indicated. Another important and often overlooked aspect of care for these patients is provision of adequate analgesia. Our main focus in this part of the presentation will be on the use of local anaesthetics and regional nerve blocks

Speakers
RT

Rebecca Tucker

Bulimba Veterinary Surgery
Bec graduated from the University of Sydney with a BVSC (Hons) in 2007. She was awarded membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (MANZCVS) in Small Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery in 2012. Bec is currently enrolled as a resident through the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

Endodontics - what could go wrong?
The aim of the presentation is demonstrate to those wishing to advance their dental skills and treatment options that procedures don’t always go to plan as in the textbooks. Endodontic therapy covers the discipline dealing with diseases that affect the tooth pulp tissue. The two most frequent procedures performed in endodontics are vital pulpotomy followed by pulp capping and pulpectomy or root canal therapy. The common problems encountered when performing endodontic therapies include variable anatomy, periapical abscessation, presence of pulp stones, obliterated canals, inadequate equipment for the species, instrument failure and breakage, tooth fracture, tooth loss and haemorrhage. We will present cases involving the complications and attempt to describe methods to overcome these issues

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30 ACST

Australian Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS) Annual meeting
Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

The interaction of behaviour and dental practice
Whether dental issues lead to behavioural problems or vice versa, we will discover whether the chicken or the egg is responsible.

Speakers
DC

David Clarke

Dr David Clarke completed his dental residency at the Dallas Dental Animal Hospital in Dallas, Texas, he is both a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College and a Fellow of the American Academy of Veterinary Dentistry. Dr David is registered as a Specialist in Veterinary... Read More →
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Building One Health partnerships
One Health recognizes that the health of humans, animals and ecosystems are interconnected. Collaboration or working together to achieve shared goals is essential to the concept of One Health. While there was a time when cross-sectoral collaboration was promoted primarily to address zoonoses (specifically highly pathogenic avian influenza), this presentation outlines how international regulations promoting agreed mechanisms for cross-sectoral collaboration now lend support to wider, practical applications of One Health.
FAO/OIE/WHO Guidelines outline a process to establish effective collaboration mechanisms based on recognised key supporting and operational elements which include; high-level commitment, common priorities, early involvement of all relevant partners, well defined roles, coordinated activity planning, routine communication, data sharing and joint training and exercises. This development of collaboration between government ministries is explored using country-specific examples. While appropriate mechanisms depend on country/cultural context, they are essential to sustainability of collaborative linkages beyond individual relationships
The importance of identifying shared goals and mutual benefits as well as addressing data confidentiality concerns are highlighted. You will be interested in this presentation if you are keen to share experiences and wish to see One Health embedded in your organisation’s culture

Speakers
DF

Dr Francette Geraghty-Dusan

Francette is an agricultural graduate and a veterinary epidemiologist. She feels privileged to have had an interesting and varied career spanning rural mixed-animal practice, urban small animal clinics, welfare work, work with the World Health Organisation in China, Laos and Fiji... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 08:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30 ACST

Clinical One Health: A formal role for veterinarians in medicine?

Thursday May 26, 2016 08:30 - 09:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30 ACST

One Health - A medical perspective
In Queensland, the formation of the Queensland One Health Group (QOHG), including veterinarians, environmental officers, industry representatives and medical staff, has enhanced communication between disciplines and improved understanding between the specialties with the aim of early recognition of threats to health. Although One Health is not a new concept, it is not often considered in medical practice. Six interlinked cases of canine and human Brucella suis infection highlight the use of One Health principles in medical practice. Other examples of One Health in practice include the impact of the 2011 Queensland floods on health, recognition of the importance of vector distributions in Queensland and consideration of the environment in the transmission of multi-resistant organisms

Speakers
DK

Dr Kathryn Wilks

Dr Kathryn Wilks started her career as a Veterinary Science graduate with an interest in the concept of “One Health”. This interest led to her undertaking a project in the Kimberley region investigating the dynamics of dogs in Aboriginal communities and the effect of a canine... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:30 - 10:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

The centre for biosecurity (CEBRA) and animal disease risk
CEBRA began as a partnership between the University of Melbourne and the federal Department of Agriculture in 2006 to develop tools and techniques for biosecurity risk analysis. Initially, it functioned as a typical CoE, with marginal success. In 2009, the relationship was revised to better integrate with Departmental priorities. This move precipitated a range of new projects that have challenged the Centre's participants and generated novel and practical solutions to some long standing problems in biosecurity risk analysis. This presentation describes the developing relationship, outlines some technical developments that have useful applications in animal biosecurity, and finally, describes some of the things that statisticians, economists and botanists may contribute when working with animal biosecurity research specialists.

Speakers
PM

Professor Mark Burgman

Mark A. Burgman is Managing Director of the Centre of Excellence for Biosecurity Risk Analysis, the Adrienne Clarke Chair of Botany in the School of Botany at the University of Melbourne and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Conservation Biology. He works on ecological modelling, conservation... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

An update on Australia's veterinary emergency plan (AUSVETPLAN)
AUSVETPLAN – the Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan – is a comprehensive series of manuals that sets out the various roles, responsibilities and policy guidelines for agencies and organisations involved in an emergency animal disease (EAD) response. AUSVETPLAN manuals are also used for training purposes and during exercises to ensure the plans will be effective and that personnel are trained in advance of an EAD outbreak
The availability of agreed AUSVETPLAN manuals ensures that informed decisions about the policies and procedures needed to manage an EAD incident in Australia are immediately at hand and there is no time lost in mounting the response.
Since 2002, Animal Health Australia (AHA) (http://www.animalhealthaustralia.com.au/) has worked with Members to prepare and review AUSVETPLAN manuals and supporting documents to ensure their accuracy and currency.
The first AUSVETPLAN manuals were written in 1986 – 25 years on they remain world-class. Recent updates to AUSVETPLAN resources will be presented. These include the publication of new and revised manuals, as well as the development of MasterDocs (www.masterdocs.com.au) – an innovative online collaborative software that has brought significant improvements to the process of editing of AUSVETPLAN manuals.

Speakers
DF

Dr Francette Geraghty-Dusan

Francette is an agricultural graduate and a veterinary epidemiologist. She feels privileged to have had an interesting and varied career spanning rural mixed-animal practice, urban small animal clinics, welfare work, work with the World Health Organisation in China, Laos and Fiji... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Longevity of immunity following Q fever vaccination
Over 300 vets (n=341) have participated in a longevity of immunity study. Serology was collected at national Veterinary conference and vet faculties at Sydney and Charles Sturt University. Demographic details, exposure history, vaccination status, and results of pre-vaccination screening (confirmed with the provider who administered the vaccine or via university health records) were collected for each individual enrolled in the study. Q fever serology was performed by the Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, Victoria using standard immunofluorescence methods (phase 1 and 2 IgG, IgM) to measure a wider variety of antibody responses compared to CFT and allow correlation with accurate vaccine history. 208 vets reported a history of Q fever vaccine and most (87-90%) were seronegative to phase 1 IgG and IgM. Cell mediated immunity (CMI) results are pending. Despite negative serology it is expected that immunity to Q fever remains given the known effectiveness of Q fever vaccine and likely role of CMI in protection

Speakers
DN

Dr Nicholas Wood

Dr Nicholas Wood is a staff specialist paediatrician at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead and the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance. He leads an NHMRC project grant titled: Q fever: How common is it and how can we best prevent it? Research to inform vaccine... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:30 ACST

MRSA in Australia in humans and animals
Antimicrobial resistance is a complex issue and the effect of MRSA in humans and animals is different in different species and countries. This presentation will help describe the issues associated with MRSA globally and particularly in Australia and discuss what we can do to limit the problem associated with this pathogen

Speakers
JH

Jane Heller

After graduation, Jane worked initially in small animal medicine in private practice, before undertaking an internship and then a Master of Veterinary Clinical Studies at the University of Sydney, where she was ‘switched on’ to Veterinary Epidemiology. Jane then went to the University... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:30 - 16:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre