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Hall N [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15

Quality of life assessment in companion animals
Quality of life is a frequently used phrase in small animal practice. What does it actually mean? How can it be systematically assessed? Why would you want to assess quality of life? In this session, we will explore the theory and practice of quality of life assessment in order to understand the potential benefits and limitations of its systematic assessment. Unusually for many disciplines in veterinary science animal welfare has involved the use of many frameworks including five freedoms, three welfare definitions (mental, physical & natural), three R’s and five domains. These have been useful to guide assessment of animal welfare (science), moral obligations towards animals (ethics) and societal expectations (policy). It is argued here that quality of life assessment can help us understand these three critical issues for companion animals. This is particularly true with respect to the emerging field of palliative and hospice style care for companion animals. What is the welfare impact of extensive medical interventions at the end-of-life? How far should we go and to whose benefit? Should we regulate such services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Animal welfare governance: Changing roles of government and industry
Animal welfare policy in the UK has changed dramatically since the 1965 Brambell report. Despite this increased effort are the current governance arrangements fit for purpose? Do the changes seen in the UK and Europe have any wider relevance? Reflecting a wider global phenomena there has been a clear shift away from government to industry based policy in farm animal welfare. In some respects this has been beneficial for animal welfare because of the speed and capability for innovation in the market-place. However, for some issues government still has a role, including prosecution for cruelty, prohibition of certain systems and labelling products. The government funding of animal welfare science is also critically important. In the UK fundamental welfare science continues whereas policy-related research have been reduced dramatically. Has the EU stepped into the gap? Sometimes yes and sometimes no. By reviewing some exemplars of policy co-ordination, such as the Dairy Welfare Strategy, this presentation will attempt to understand how veterinarians can contribute to effective animal welfare governance

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Preventative behavioural medicine in dogs and cats PART 1
Strategies to prevent behavioural problems in dogs and cats can be conveniently divided into two categories: those that refer to early development of the puppy or kitten, and those that can be implemented at any age. Early development of dogs and cats includes four phases: pre-natal, neonatal, transition, socialisation and juvenile. Research done in a variety of species has shown that animals born to mothers that have suffered stress during pregnancy are likely to be more easily stressed as adults. Therefore, providing a non-stressful environment for the dam is important. Adequate tactile stimulation during the neonatal period results in animals being more able to adjust the intensity of their stress response to the relevance of the stressor. The importance of the socialization period cannot be overemphasized and dogs and cats should be exposed during this period to conspecifics, adult humans, infants and any stimuli that they are likely to encounter later on in life. Weaning age has a long-lasting effect on behaviour and research has shown that early weaning may result in lower tolerance to frustration. Environmental influences early in life interact with the genetic make-up of the individual and this will also be dealt with in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Preventative behavioural medicine in dogs and cats PART 2
As many behavioural problems are caused by stress, management strategies aimed at reducing stress have a positive effect on the behaviour of dogs and cats. The stress response is triggered when animals are unable to predict and control their environment. Setting consistent rules, so that the expectations of the animals are met, increases the predictability of their environment. Several studies have shown that environmental enrichment reduces stress. In practice, environmental enrichment should allow animals to express their natural behaviour and provide them with a safe area. Affiliative relationships with other animals and with humans also reduce the stress response. Some behavioural problems are caused by pain and therefore early identification and treatment of pain will also contribute to preventing behavioural problems. It has been suggested that neutering reduces the likelihood of some behavioural problems, in particular those that are sexually dimorphic, such as inter-male aggression, urine marking and roaming. However, some recent evidence seem to indicate that neutering may increase the risk of other behaviour problems, such as noise fear. The effects of neutering on behaviour will be discussed in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats in South Australia- science, policy and public opinion.
Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats will soon be regulated in South Australia. The aim of this talk will be to provide some background into the policy leading to the legislative change. In dogs, the aim is to reduce the number of dog attacks in the community, while in cats better population management may lead to reduced numbers of cats taken to shelters. The changes in South Australia are an interesting case study of the intersection of scientific evidence, policy and public opinion. Public opinion had a large part to play, with a Citizen Jury making the final recommendation to the Minister. However, the decision is not without controversy, and some of the more hotly debated implications will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Susan Hazel

Susan Hazel

Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide
Susan Hazel is a veterinary graduate from the University of Sydney. She is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide and teaches in animal behaviour, welfare and ethics. Susan is a Member of 2 South Australian Animal Ethics Committees... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Ag-gag laws for Australia? Implications for livestock industries and the public's right to know
Ag-gag legislation can be broadly described as any law or legal instrument, which in form or operation, has the effect of impeding public and political communication about agricultural practices, particularly relating to the treatment of animals. Such laws have been vigorously pursued in the United States as a means of addressing the increased use of private surveillance devices to expose cases of farm animal cruelty. Some legislators in Australia are now pursuing a similar legislative agenda. This presentation will review the nature of ag-gag laws, the debate in the US, and the proposals for Australia. The potential long-term implications for livestock industries will be considered and alternative strategies to achieve the same ends will be proposed.

Speakers
JG

Jed Goodfellow

Dr Jed Goodfellow is the Senior Policy Officer at RSPCA Australia and a Lecturer in Animal Law at Macquarie University. He recently completed his PhD thesis examining the animal welfare regulatory framework within the Australian agricultural sector. Prior to undertaking his postgraduate... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00

Welfare of dairy cattle: from basic principles to practical applications
Dairy cattle welfare can be assessed using several protocols, one of them being the Welfare Quality® protocol, which includes four principles of good welfare: good feeding, good housing, good health and appropriate behaviour. Each principle is divided into several criteria and each criteria is assessed through several indicators, many of them animal-based. Some of the main problems related to feeding are poor body condition and inadequate access to water. Comfort at resting is one of the main housing issues, as dairy cows should lie down for a prolonged period of time every day. Painful conditions such as lameness and mastitis are important welfare problems under the principle of good health, whereas fear of humans due to poor stockmanship is one of the main issues under the principle of appropriate behaviour. Some of the indicators that are included in the Welfare Quality® protocol will be covered in the lecture. Additionally, some welfare issues and indicators that are not part of the Welfare Quality® protocol, such as heat stress will be covered. The relationship between welfare and performance will also be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Social behaviour of dogs and cats: from basic principles to practical applications
Some of the main behavioural problems in dogs and cats, including aggression and separation anxiety, are related to social behaviour. Therefore, understanding the basic principles of social behaviour is essential to prevent and treat such problems. Social behaviour within a given species will vary depending on environmental features such as food abundance and distribution, for example. This is the case with free-living domestic cats, which may either form colonies or show a solitary, territorial social organization. There are several factors that explain why cats are more tolerant to conspecifics in certain conditions and understanding these factors is important to reduce the risk of inter-cat aggression. In the case of dogs, one aspect of their social behaviour that has received a great deal of attention is the importance, if any, of dominance and hierarchy. Research shows that the importance of dominance-based relationships in dogs has been overemphasized and the practical implications of current thinking on the importance of dominance relationships in dogs will be discussed in the lecture. Affiliative relationships and appropriate social attachment appear to be of paramount importance to reduce stress and the likelihood of dogs developing separation anxiety

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

The relaxation response to reduce anxiety
Anxiety disorders in animals are characterised by physiological signs associated with dominance of the sympathetic nervous system. Successful treatment of behaviour cases relies upon developing a reliable relaxation response in the patient. The relaxation response describes the physiological state where the parasympathetic response dominates. In the parasympathetic dominate state the brain is calm and the limbic system is subordinate to the higher executive functions allowing formation of declarative or factual memories- learning can occur. The relaxation response is encouraged through behavioural therapy geared towards reducing stressful stimuli in the environment, specific exercises to induce relaxation and medication to decrease activity of the limbic system and therefore decrease activation of the sympathetic system. In combination these help develop new neural pathways that control behaviours such as remaining calm, relaxed and responsive to the owner

Speakers
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Dr Jacqui Ley graduated from Melbourne University Veterinary School in 1995 and became a Registered Specialist in Veterinary Behaviour in 20XX after gaining her Fellowship to the Australian and New Zealand College of Veteirnary Science and her Diplomat of the European COllege of Animal... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Polypharmacy: What you need to know when using psychotropic medications
Increasingly there are more medications used to treat animals with behavioural problems. Appropriate psychotropic medication combinations can lead to lower doses of individual medications, synergistic effects and better targeted treatments leading to better management of the behavioural condition. Inappropriate combination of medication, apart from not improving the animal’s behavioural problem, can also lead to serious side effects including gastrointestinal problems, serotonin syndrome, seizures, coma and even death. Additionally, some psychotropic medications are contraindicated with concurrent use of some common drugs used for parasite control and pain relief. It is essential that veterinarians consider all of the drugs the animal is taking concurrently

Speakers
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Physiological stress coping in greyhound dogs with or without aggression
The way a dog copes with stress could influence it’s propensity to be aggressive. This study used an emerging technique in behavioural research – heart rate variability. Potential links between heart rate variability, reactivity and the way in which an animal copes with stress may exist. Greyhound dogs (n=34) from a canine blood bank service were recruited. Dogs were individually tested during their monthly blood donation, with individual salivary cortisol measurements taken 5 minutes prior to, and 20 minutes after the procedure. During the procedure, a Polar® heart rate monitor was used to measure heart rate variability. During the following 6 months, the dogs were tested for rehoming suitability including a test for inter-dog aggression. Dogs that failed the aggression test had a significantly greater difference between the pre and post-bleeding cortisol levels compared with dogs that passed (0.97ng/ml, 95% CI, 0.11 to 1.83, P = 0.029). Mean heart rate during the procedure was greater in dogs that failed the aggression test (13.6bpm, 95% CI, 2.3 to 24.8, P = 0.018), however heart rate variability (SDNN) was greater in dogs that passed (53.5, 95% CI, 24.7 to 82.2, P = 0.001). This study demonstrates a novel method of measuring stress coping style in dogs which opens new avenues for future research into canine aggression

Speakers
DD

Dr Dennis Wormald

Dennis Wormald started his research career in 2006, completing a behavioural neuroscience honours year at the Howard Florey Institute with Melbourne University. Dennis then completed the bachelor of Veterinary Science at Melbourne University in 2010. Following two years in private... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Separation anxiety in dogs: a review of current knowledge
Separation anxiety is one of the most common behavioural problems in dogs and has very important effects on their welfare. A brief summary of the epidemiology and clinical signs f separation anxiety will be given in the lecture. Although some dogs with separation anxiety show hyperattachment to their owners, many others don´t, suggesting that separation anxiety has many different causes. Conditioned fear has long been proposed as one cause of separation anxiety in dogs that do not have hyperattachment, whereas more recent research indicates that other dogs may develop separation anxiety as a result of “inadequate” attachment. The reasons leading to such “inadequate” attachment as well as its implications for the prevention of separation anxiety will be explained in the lecture. Another aspect of separation anxiety that has been recently revisited is the treatment protocol. In contrast to traditional recommendations, it has now been suggested that providing cues that allow the dog to distinguish between actual and “fake” departures may have a positive effect both on its welfare and on the resolution of the problem, as the dog’s perception of control and predictability is increased. The details and practicalities of the suggested treatment protocol will be discussed in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00

So it’s time to stop…what now? Approaches to weaning off anxiolytic medications
Many of the anxiolytics commonly used in veterinary practice – both short and long-acting – are not currently registered for use in dogs and cats in Australia. Furthermore the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of these medications are often based on human literature. Although the initial treatment of behaviour disorders is obviously important for veterinarians and pet owners, pet owners also need help through the weaning process. This presentation will discuss when in the treatment process to consider discontinuing anxiolytic medication and approaches to the weaning process. The presentation will also discuss management strategies and approaches to changing from one anxiolytic medication to another for cases where the first choice of anxiolytic has been ineffective or adverse effects have been seen

Speakers
DT

Dr Trepheena Hunter

Dr Trepheena Hunter (BAgSc (hons) MAgSc, BVSc (hons), MANZCVS) graduated from the University of Queensland in 2004. After working in mixed practice, she moved into small animal practice and developed a strong interest in veterinary behavioural medicine. Trepheena gained Membership... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Can you help me…please? Behavioural triage strategies in general practice
The majority of clients in general practice have questions about their pet’s behaviour. Knowing where to direct clients with behavioural concerns is essential in general practice both to provide the best care for the animal and to build trust in the relationship between vet and client. The challenge is achieving this is a 15 minute consultation. This presentation will discuss approaches to behavioural triage in general practice including history taking and differential diagnoses to determine appropriate outcome, including referral to general trainer, behavioural trainer, general practitioner or veterinary behaviourist

Speakers
DT

Dr Trepheena Hunter

Dr Trepheena Hunter (BAgSc (hons) MAgSc, BVSc (hons), MANZCVS) graduated from the University of Queensland in 2004. After working in mixed practice, she moved into small animal practice and developed a strong interest in veterinary behavioural medicine. Trepheena gained Membership... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

The use of trazodone in general practice
Veterinary visits can be extremely stressful for pets, and the peri-operative period of confinement may lead to a spike in anxiety. Providing for these patients with the use of short-term, effective anxiolytics is important from a welfare perspective. In doing so, this would help to ameliorate the situation and reduce the formation of negative associations and fearful reactions to the clinic setting. Staff safety will also improve. Trazodone, a serotonin 2A antagonist and reuptake inhibitor, is a great adjunctive anxiolytic for use in the clinic setting. It is also useful as an “event” medication alongside long-term medications (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Trazodone has a favourable, broad margin of safety. Its use generally is without significant side effects and it can be safely co-administered with many common veterinary medications. This presentation will review the literature on the use of trazodone, particularly in the general practice setting. We will also cover in which situations it would be effective, and in which situations its use should be avoided.

Speakers
DC

Dr Chalette Brown

Chalette is originally from South Africa, but has lived in Australia for more than a decade. She graduated from the first cohort of DVM students of the University of Adelaide (Roseworthy Campus) in 2013. Chalette now works in General Practice and also for Adelaide Veterinary Behaviour... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Assessing welfare in zoo animals
Animal welfare has become a priority for modern zoos. Animal welfare assessment protocols must be based on the principle that welfare includes the physical and the emotional health of the animals. Welfare indicators can be conveniently divided into “resource-based” and “animal-based” indicators, the latter including changes in behaviour, appearance, health and physiological parameters. Behavioural changes are particularly useful to assess welfare and they include both “abnormal” behaviours (i.e. behaviours that are never or rarely seen in the wild and that are indicative of poor welfare) and changes in the frequency, duration or intensity of normal behaviours. Stereotypies and apathy are examples of “abnormal” behaviours, whereas changes in play, aggression and maternal behaviour are examples of the second category of behavioural indicators. Body condition, physiological measures (including measures of the HPA axis activity), prevalence and incidence of disease, and life span are also useful to assess welfare. All these indicators, however, have methodological limitations and animal welfare can only be properly assessed using a combination of several indicators. Examples of welfare indicators that can be used in zoo animals, mainly in mammals and birds, will be given in the lecture. Additionally, some recent developments in the field of zoo animal welfare assessment will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Role of veterinarians in cruelty cases
Veterinary surgeons in the UK are often asked to provide reports to courts describing factual observations and their expert opinion on the presence or absence of unnecessary suffering. Although experts are obliged to act on behalf of the court, the quality of expert witness reports has been recently criticised. This presentation will summarise a recent review of 42 expert witness reports that describes the approaches taken to the assessment of unnecessary suffering. Whilst most reports suitably described factual observations, there was significant variation in the opinions on suffering and the actions of the owner. Severity and duration of potential suffering was inconsistently included as was comments on the impact on either mental or physical state. The necessity of suffering was also often not included in the opinion. External references supporting the opinion of the expert was only provided in a minority of reports. There was evidence of disputes between experts concerning the definition of suffering, the significance of clinical findings and the relevance of different assessment methods. It is suggested that expert witness reports should include a systematic consideration of the animal’s mental and physical states, severity of harm, duration of harm and a commentary on the necessity of suffering as defined by legislation

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00

Is behaviour a work place and safety issue?
A systematic review of the literature and data is used to determine the importance of animal behaviour in the workplace. This presentation looks at the risks of working within the veterinary workplace and the role behaviour plays in them. It reveals an understanding of veterinary behaviour is crucial when managing workplace health and safety issues. It goes onto show an understanding of veterinary behaviour is necessary for all members of the veterinary team. This allows them to manage the animals in their care safely, to practise veterinary science to the best of their abilities and to a culture that improves the safety and wellbeing of themselves and their patients. Adopting low stress handling techniques improves the quality of data collected during clinical examination. It also improves the standard of veterinary diagnosis and care, the profitability of the practice and job satisfaction of staff, but most importantly it raises the welfare standards and quality of life of animals in veterinary care

Speakers
AO

Andrew O'Shea

Camden Valley Animal Hospitals
Andrew has practised veterinary science in the Macarthur region of NSW since graduating in 1987. Since gaining membership of the Veterinary Behaviour chapter of the Australian and New Zealand college of Veterinary Scientists in 2008 he has provided a comprehensive veterinary behaviour... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

The neurophysiology of fears and anxiety. Why anxious dogs can’t learn!
Fears Phobias and Anxiety are closely linked. Veterinarians require an understanding of these responses to be able to help their patients. Fear is a neurological, physiological, emotional, hormonal and behavioural response to a threat and a comprehensive description of the fear response is developed in this presentation. How short term memory and long term memory are developed and laid down is described, along with how memory is recalled. The impact of the fear response and cortisol on these processes is looked in detail. All of this is brought together to develop an understanding of the relationship between fears phobias and anxieties. This allows the participants to understand what fearful and anxious animals are likely to learn and why they cannot learn simple tasks

Speakers
AO

Andrew O'Shea

Camden Valley Animal Hospitals
Andrew has practised veterinary science in the Macarthur region of NSW since graduating in 1987. Since gaining membership of the Veterinary Behaviour chapter of the Australian and New Zealand college of Veterinary Scientists in 2008 he has provided a comprehensive veterinary behaviour... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

How to implement a fear free practice!
Stress & fear levels can be reduced in our patients by catering to the animal's natural behaviour. Simple modifications in your practice can greatly diminish anxiety. An outline of facility modification, chemical help, handling techniques & client expectations will be explained at a practical level. Drawing on personal experience gained in over 25 years of general practice, Moss will highlight the techniques he uses to implement fear free practice. It is also a good marketing strategy to set yourself apart from other vets & you will have new, very loyal clients coming in the door! Staff prefer handling chilled out cats & calm dogs as well. It is not expensive to implement but does require some habit changes by all the staff

Speakers
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →
avatar for Moss Siddle

Moss Siddle

Principal Veterinary Surgeon, Dandenong Ranges Veterinary Centre
Dr Moss Siddle BVSc has been a private veterinary practitioner for over 20 years. He established Dandenong Ranges Veterinary Centre in 1999. The practice has won an AVA / Pfizer “Practice of Excellence in Customer Service Award” and operates under the “Fear Free” philosophy... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Behavioural changes caused by stress in companion animals Part 1
Stress causes a variety of behavioural changes in dogs and cats, and many of such changes may have a negative effect on the human-animal bond or on the health of the animal. Stress often results in a decrease in feed intake and this is particularly common in cats, particularly when stress and diet change happen at the same time. Stress-induced anorexia in cats may lead to disease and it may appear together with a reduction in general activity. Occasionally, however, stress has the opposite effect and it has been suggested that stress may be one of the factors contributing to obesity in companion animals. Aggressive behaviour has many different causes and there is evidence that stress may increase aggression. This effect may be partly mediated by a decrease in serotonin activity in chronically stressed animals. Another behavioural problem that is sometimes caused by stress is urine marking in cats. Changes in the environment and inter-cat conflict are the most common stressors that may cause urine marking. However, urine marking is affected not only by stress but also by sexual hormones and therefore not all cases of urine marking are related to stress. Stress may also contribute to interstitial cystitis, which is another cause of inappropriate elimination in cats

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Behavioural changes caused by stress in companion animals Part 2
Repetitive behaviours are often related to stress and are potential indicators of poor welfare. Repetitive behaviours include pacing, over-grooming, self-mutilation and fly-biting, among many others. Repetitive behaviours may be caused by a variety of medical conditions and therefore a complete medical check-out must be the first step in the diagnosis. Very often, however, repetitive behaviours are shown by apparently healthy animals and appear to be caused by a sub-optimal environment. Chronic stress, inability to perform highly motivated behaviours and repeated conflict situations can result in animals developing repetitive behaviours. Some individual animals seem to be more predisposed to develop repetitive behaviours when the environment is inadequate and such predisposition results from a combination of genetic factors and early experience. Once initiated, repetitive behaviours may be perpetuated through several mechanisms, including learning. Treatment of repetitive behaviours should include changes in the environment, advising the owner not to reinforce the behaviour and, in some cases, pharmacological treatment. Pharmacological treatment is based on the fact that in some cases repetitive behaviours are associated to changes in serotonin and / or dopamine activity in the brain

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre