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Hall L [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Phase I Rehab principles - Joint motion and early weightbearing
This presentation will cover early rehabilitation techniques for the acute postoperative or injured patient. Emphasis will be on joint and early weight-bearing exercises, including passive range of motion, stretching, and exercises to encourage early weight-bearing and limb use.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Phase II Rehab principles - Cardiovascular conditioning, proprioception, and limb use exercises
Intermediate rehabilitation exercises will be discussed in this lecture. Early cardiovascular conditioning and limb use exercises will be emphasized is part of a plan to encourage early return to function. In addition, proprioceptive exercises will be covered for both neurologic and orthopedic patients, including joint proprioceptive activities.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:45 ACST

Governor and Presidents Welcome followed by Plenary - The 'toll' of knowing you are sick: Implications for acute pain management and consequences for chronic agony
The "toll"of knowing you are sick:implications for acute pain management and consequences for chronic agony

Speakers
avatar for Mark Hutchinson

Mark Hutchinson

Professor Hutchinson is an ARC Australian Research Fellow and is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP). He is also a Professor within the School of Medicine at the University of Adelaide. Professor Hutchinson returned to the University of Adelaide... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 10:45 - 12:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Phase III Rehab principles - Exercises to obtain peak recovery and performance
As patients become more willing to use the limb and enter the late phase of rehabilitation, exercises to regain peak performance and activity are necessary. This presentation will focus on bringing the patient back to winning form.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Clinical diagnosis of cruciate disease: What are we missing?
Cruciate disease has been described as the “Achilles heel” of dogs. The lameness and osteoarthritis that result are the most common orthopaedic presentation in small animal practice. Cruciate disease is also the most commonly operated orthopaedic problem in dogs. Despite this many cases of cruciate disease are not diagnosed or managed effectively despite repeat presentations of the animal by the owner. Why is this? Traditionally we have been taught that diagnosing cruciate disease requires demonstration of stifle joint instability. Through a better understanding of disease progression we now know that cruciate instability is the end-stage of a slowly progressive disease. We also know that by waiting until the joint is unstable before operating we increase the risk of secondary meniscal injury and more severe osteoarthritis by 160 fold. This session will use video case studies to focus in a very practical way on the key points that simplify early clinical diagnosis of cruciate disease. The importance of radiographs in the diagnosis and treatment decision-making in cruciate disease will be highlighted through case studies.

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →



Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Radiology of benign versus aggressive bone and joint disease
While extremes of benign and aggressive disease of musculoskeletal structures are reasonably apparent to most clinicians, the spectrum of radiographic features can be quite broad and significant overlap is frequently present, making interpretation difficult. Temporal features of the disease process can have a significant influence upon the physical properties of the affected anatomical structures and hence the radiographic signs that the clinician may identify on first examination. Further confusion can arise when more acute disease is superimposed upon pre-existing conditions, such as osteoarthrosis or anomalous variants in development. Radiographic interpretation is not a histological diagnosis, but careful examination for key features combined with the clinical context (history, signalment and other pertinent information) can provide the veterinarian with greater conviction regarding the underlying aetiology of lesions, and hence a prioritised approach to further diagnostic and/or therapeutic interventions. Using case examples and correlative alternative imaging modalities, the features of osteomyelitis, septic and immune-mediated arthritis, osteoarthrosis, and neoplasia of bones and joints will be reviewed, along with the indications for further diagnostic tests

Speakers
DR

Dr Robert Nicoll

Prior to specialising in diagnostic imaging, Robert worked in mixed veterinary practice for several years in Bathurst, NSW. After undertaking his residency training at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, he returned to Australia and with Graeme Allan, Robert formed Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Technical and clinical reasons for radiographs to hide lesions
Radiographic interpretation combines an understanding of normal radiographic anatomy with the pathophysiology of disease and how this will influence image formation. For this reason, disorders and diseases of animals fall into one of two categories – those that are radiographically detectable and those that are not. In order to be detected, the clinician must be able to appreciate a change in radiographic features from that which would normally be expected. Technical issues can affect image quality such that abnormalities can be impossible to detect, missed or overlooked. Those diseases that do not alter physiology and anatomy sufficiently to alter the radiographic image cannot be detected. Other complications in radiographic interpretation occur when different diseases create the same change in radiographic features as one another, despite their differing aetiology (and hence differing prognosis and therapeutic options). For all these reasons it is imperative for the radiographic evaluation to be complete and of a sufficiently high standard to be deemed a diagnostic series. A key to interpretation is to have a generic approach in the identification of abnormalities as specific radiographic signs so that multiple aetiologies of lesions can be considered. The clinician reviewing the examination can be aided by an understanding of how certain disorders would be expected to manifest but should aim to be open minded during interpretation so that multiple lesions or differential diagnoses are not overlooked. Case studies will be used to illustrate common radiographic technical and interpretation pitfalls and how to avoid them

Speakers
DR

Dr Robert Nicoll

Prior to specialising in diagnostic imaging, Robert worked in mixed veterinary practice for several years in Bathurst, NSW. After undertaking his residency training at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, he returned to Australia and with Graeme Allan, Robert formed Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Common fractures of the hindlimb
This session will use case studies to focus on the tips, tricks and decision-making to achieve consistent success in resolving hindlimb fractures in dogs and cats that present commonly in small animal practice. Distal femoral physeal fractures occur commonly in immature dogs and cats. This is the most common type of Salter-Harris fracture that presents in small animal practice. How to simplify fracture reduction and pin placement will be covered. Acetabular fractures are a common occurrence following major pelvic trauma and require the attending veterinarian to decide between fracture repair, conservative management and excision arthroplasty or other salvage procedure. Simple guidelines for deciding on how to manage these fractures will be covered. The tibia is one of the most commonly fractured bones in dogs and is the only long bone where every one of the fracture repair options can be used. Options for treatment, particularly of comminuted fractures, will be covered through case studies

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →



Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Open fractures don't need ESFs or amputation!
Open fractures are complex slow healing fractures that have a greater risk of becoming a nonunion than a closed fracture. Many open fractures end with an amputation that in most cases was avoidable with correct management. Open fractures have been traditionally associated with external skeletal fixators (ESFs) - and complications!! Today with a better understanding of fracture biology and fracture repair methods it is apparent that in many cases the wrong decision for fracture repair is the use of an ESF. Using bone plates to repair open fractures used to be considered to be the second choice to ESFs whereas today plate repair is the most common used by most specialists. This session will use case studies to focus on the decision-making in open fracture treatment that will maximize success and minimize complications

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:45 ACST

Address by 2016 Gilruth Prize recipient – Professor Mary Barton AO followed by Plenary: Personal resilience in a time of crisis: insights from an Egyptian prison - Peter Greste
Speakers
avatar for Peter Greste

Peter Greste

Peter Greste is an Australian-born journalist with 25 years experience as a foreign correspondent. He covered the civil war in Yugoslavia and elections in South Africa as a freelance reporter, before joining the BBC as its Afghanistan correspondent in 1995.In December 2013 he was... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 10:45 - 12:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Common fractures of the forelimb
Case based lecture outlining management of the common fractures of the forelimb seen in small animal practice. Complications and successful strategies

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Surgical management of ACL disease
Cruciate disease is the most common orthopaedic condition seen in veterinary practice. Following on from the Clinical Diagnosis lecture, the pros and cons of the major surgical procedures for dogs will be discussed. Tips and tricks for successful outcomes will be outlined

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Decision making in hip dysplasia
Pointers and pearls for diagnosis including gait findings, Ortolani sign, radiographic and CT imaging will be included. Surgical options including results and complications of JPS, TPO/DPO, FHNEA and THR will be outlined

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Pain management for intra-operative and immediately post-operative orthopaedic patients
Pain management begins with a thorough evaluation of the patient's pain level and pain management history.   Control of pain is essential prior to induction, allowing a smoother induction process and minimizing patient stress.  In some cases, the analgesics used as part of the premedication are sufficient analgesia for the intra-operative period.   Opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local anaesthetics, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and anti-epileptics drug are options for premedication that aid in intra-operative analgesia.  For cases in which additional analgesic is required, the use of ketamine, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, opioids, and local anaesthetics as bolus, intramuscular, epidural or as constant rate infusion should be considered.  Immediately post-operative care includes the above mentioned drugs but can also include cold or heat therapy, depending on the injury, topical local anaesthetics, and laser therapy.  Monitoring the immediate post-operative period is essential to avoid hypothermia or the stoic sedate patient.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Rehab widgets and gadgets - modalities used in rehabilitation
Many rehabilitation modalities are available. Which ones work, and which ones don’t for what conditions? This lecture will review therapeutic laser, therapeutic ultrasound, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, extracorporeal shockwave treatment, and pulsed electromagnetic fields.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Rehabilitation of stifle joint conditions
Stifle conditions are among the most common orthopedic issues facing veterinarians. In particular, rupture of the cranial crucial ligament  is one of the most prevalent conditions treated by orthopedic surgeons. Equally important to the surgical technique to stabilize the stifle is the postoperative rehabilitation. This lecture will review the principles of rehabilitation for cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Principles of physiotherapy for orthopaedic conditions
NOTE: This session will now be presented by Helen Nicholson
Physiotherapy has been a vital part of patient care in human medicine for decades and research has shown that physiotherapy improves functional outcomes, reduces the need for analgesia and reduces the length of hospital stay.
Despite similar outcomes in dogs, physiotherapy is still not a standard part of pre- and post-operative care for many animals. This lecture addresses how to identify and assess problems which are suitable for physiotherapy and how to develop a rehabilitation plan.

Speakers
DN

Dr Naomi Boyd

Naomi Boyd graduated as a physiotherapist from the University of Sydney in 2004 and as a veterinarian from the same university in 2011. As a human physiotherapist, she has worked in musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy with high level sports teams and international athletes. Naomi... Read More →
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

An alternative approach to pain management for orthopaedic patients
Human patients are immediately started in a physiotherapy and rehabilitative program after an orthopaedic injury. Massage, acupuncture, stretching and cold and heat therapies are included in the treatment plans for these patients. Although it is not always wise or practical to use human medicine as a gold standard for care, in orthopaedic injury cases, we need to look to the human model. Alternative care can result in faster and stronger recovery in our veterinary patients.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Plenary - Challenges and opportunities for the veterinary profession from Demographic changes
Challenges and opportunities for the veterinary profession from Demographic changes

Speakers
avatar for Bernard Salt

Bernard Salt

Bernard Salt is widely regarded as one of Australia's leading social commentators by business, the media and the broader community. He is a high-profile Melbourne-based Partner with the global advisory firm KPMG where he founded the specialist advisory business, KPMG Demographics... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Aggressive behaviour in cats
Aggressive behaviour towards humans or other cats is a relatively common complaint in feline behavioural medicine, being second only to inappropriate elimination. Cats that live indoors and those that have been obtained from a pet shop seem to be more likely to develop aggressive behaviour. The most common forms of aggressive behaviour towards other cats are fear aggression, territorial aggression and intra-sexual aggression. Fear and territorial aggression can be distinguished based on the cat’s body posture (defensive in fear aggression and offensive in territorial aggression) and the time course of the problem, which tends to be more gradual in the case of territorial aggression and more sudden in fear aggression. Intra-sexual aggression is shown between adult, entire males. Many cases of aggression towards humans are either fear aggression, petting-related aggression or redirected aggression. Redirected aggression occurs when cats are unable to direct their aggression towards the eliciting stimulus, which very often is the presence of another cat or a noise. Cats with redirected aggression may display very sudden, violent attacks. The causes, diagnosis and treatment of these forms of aggression will be explained in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

AGM and Awards ceremony
Registration opens at 3pm outside Hall L next to the Exhibition entrance.
 

Wednesday May 25, 2016 16:00 - 18:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Neurological physiotherapy - A motor relearning perspective
Physiotherapy is a vital part of the rehabilitation of humans with neurological conditions, often commencing in ICU and continuing for many months after discharge from hospital. Human physiotherapy techniques are based on research into sensorimotor systems, motor relearning, neuroplasticity and functional outcomes. Many of the foundational studies in the human evidence base used experimental animal models, leading some to ask if the techniques would translate to the rehabilitation of pet dogs and cats. This lecture will introduce key concepts and outline the sequence of motor relearning from passive range of motion and sensory awareness, through bed mobility, transitions, static balance and dynamic balance, to gait re-education and advanced rehabilitation. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the practical application of the specific techniques described with the aim that attendees will feel confident to apply safe, effective rehabilitation techniques to their caseload upon return to work.

Speakers
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Physiotherapy to augment airways and ICU conditions
Veterinarians rightly demand that physiotherapy techniques used to augment their gold standard treatment of small animals with life-threatening conditions is evidence based, but when reviewing the literature thoroughly, it can be seen that many of the studies that laid the foundation for modern human ICU physiotherapy were performed on experimental dogs and cats. Of course, differences remain between experimentally induced and spontaneously occurring illness, but systematically reviewing the human evidence base allows practitioners to determine the likelihood of success of specific techniques in small animals. This lecture will compare the causes of admission to human and small animal intensive care units and review the evidence for physiotherapy for conditions common to both. Examples of cases amenable to adjunctive physiotherapy will be described, including tick poisoning, snake bite, brachycephalic airways disease, neurological crisis and orthopaedic trauma. These examples will give attendees the framework to apply techniques to safely improve the rehabilitation of acutely unwell small animals in their care.

Speakers
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Rehabilitation of fractures
Rehabilitation following fracture repair is important to return animals to full function. As important, is knowing when to restrict activity or increase activity based on the stage of fracture healing and the stability of the repair. Fractures in and around joints are especially important for rehabilitation to help prevent joint stiffness and decreased function. In addition, fractures that are managed with casts or splints will have some stiffness of joints and muscle atrophy. Recognizing these issues and addressing them with rehabilitation are important to return to function.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

Ben Cunneen Memorial Plenary - Disease surveillance- where we are and where we need to be - what role for a one health approach
Disease surveillance- where we are and where we need to be - what role for a one health approach

Speakers
avatar for Professor Martyn Jeggo

Professor Martyn Jeggo

Professor Jeggo qualified as veterinary surgeon in the UK in 1972 and after a short four-year spell in general practice has worked in research and research management of infectious diseases. This included spells in a number of developing countries, at the UK high containment laboratory... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

Nutraceutical therapies for osteoarthritis
“Nutraceuticals” (nutrients or food-based derivatives administered above the individual’s daily requirement for the purpose of disease treatment or prevention) and other naturally-derived “complementary animal health products” are widely administered to Australian pets with osteoarthritis. Some pet owners who wish to avoid the use or over-use of medications may elect to administer nutraceuticals or complementary products in preference to registered veterinary pharmaceutical products and in more severe cases of joint pain this practice might be considered an animal welfare issue for veterinarians. The array of products marketed for joint health in dogs and cats is vast and providing informed advice to clients can be daunting. However multiple clinical trials have been performed and published in the peer-reviewed veterinary literature evaluating nutraceutical and other dietary supplements for canine and feline osteoarthritis, although the quality of these studies and their conclusions can be variable. In this session the evidence for and against the commonly-used nutraceuticals and complementary products will be reviewed and guidelines for their ethical use discussed

Speakers
DD

Dr David Davies

David Davies graduated from Murdoch University with first class honours in 1992 then worked in general practice for several years. David returned to Murdoch in 2000 to complete his Residency in Small Animal Medicine, including stints at Massey University and the Royal Veterinary College... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Diagnostic evaluation and cytology of synovial fluid
A systematic diagnostic approach to a patient with lameness and accurate joint fluid analysis provides important tools for the classification of arthropathies in small animals. Synovial fluid analysis should provide a minimum database for the clinical work-up of joint disease and is a critical component in determining the cause of disease. Aspects of complete analysis should include: proper sample collection protocols, gross appearance, colour and viscosity of fluid, nucleated cell counts, protein concentration measurements and cytologic evaluation of cells. Standardized methods to these steps should provide an accurate classification and differentiation of common diseases. These diseases can then be classified according to inflammatory disease, degenerative disease, haemarthrosis or neoplasia. The inflammatory disease aspect can also be importantly sub-divided into infectious and non-infectious (immune-mediated) causes. There also some limitations and challenges of additional testing procedures such as fluid culture and anti-nuclear antibody testing, that must also be considered. This presentation summarizes joint fluid analysis and cytology within the clinical pathology

Speakers
DW

Dr William Gow

Veterinary Clinical Pathologist, IDEXX Laboratories
William was awarded his Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (BVMS) from Murdoch University in 2009. After graduation, William practiced for approximately two years as a veterinary surgeon in small animal general practice in Western Australia, as well... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Rehabilitation of neurologic conditions
Veterinarians are frequently faced with neurologic conditions such as intervertebral disc disease, fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy, and degenerative myelopathy. These common conditions are ideal for rehabilitation to help speed recovery and reduce the unwanted effects of tissue atrophy. Methods of encouraging limit and muscle use, gait training, and proprioception will be emphasized.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30 ACST

AVA Member Forum
AVA Member Forum - Facilitator James O'Loghlin

Thursday May 26, 2016 16:30 - 18:00 ACST
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre