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City Room 4 [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

A Step-by-step guide to dental radiography
Dental radiographs can be taken by general practitioners through adapting their existing knowledge and practice. The equipment and techniques for producing a full mouth series of images will be covered. Whilst a dedicated dental X-ray machine and film is preferable and easier, some tips will be given on using standard X-ray equipment

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

veterinarian, AVA Regions
Dr Tara Cashman graduated from the University of Sydney in 1995, returning 2 years later to complete her Diploma in Veterinary Clinical Studies in Mixed Practice. Tara became interested in dentistry after working for a number of years in small animal/equine practice as she realised... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Why work blind? Learn to interpret your dental radiographs
Dental radiography is an extension of the complete oral examination and should be considered an essential part of small animal dentistry. Normal radiographic anatomy of the dog and cat will be covered, followed by anatomical variations and common dental pathologies. Learn to use radiology to make your life easier and more efficient

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

veterinarian, AVA Regions
Dr Tara Cashman graduated from the University of Sydney in 1995, returning 2 years later to complete her Diploma in Veterinary Clinical Studies in Mixed Practice. Tara became interested in dentistry after working for a number of years in small animal/equine practice as she realised... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Dental radiography - why good medicine makes good business sense
There are no more excuses for not having dental radiography in your practice. If you are not taking dental radiographs you are missing disease and not treating your patients adequately. In addition to diagnosis, dental radiography also helps with clinical decision making and assists with extraction planning. These both help to make dental procedures go more smoothly and end up reducing stress in your vets. Dental radiography becomes the cornerstone to improve awareness and confidence in your staff that you are providing value to your clients and patients and helps to grow your dental program. You can also consider adding more services to your practice that can help your practice grow. Seeing the miraculous results in your patients because you treated all the disease that was present is reward enough to convince you that dental radiography is essential and equipment will quickly pay for itself if used properly

Speakers
AH

Amanda Hulands-Nave

Director, Bellarine Veterinary Practice
Amanda Hulands-Nave BVSc(Hons) MVSt MACVSc (SA Med) MANZCVS (SA Dent) Amanda graduated from the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999 and from Murdoch University with a Masters of Veterinary Studies in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery in 2005. Amanda... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Extractions - keeping out of trouble!
Dental extractions are a daunting prospect for many. They are the number one reason Veterinarians ignore dental complaints in their patients. If you are worried by the possibility of extractions, your patients will suffer. Extractions are a legitimate and often required treatment for our Veterinary patients. From “simple” non-surgical approaches to the much more involved surgical removal of large teeth, your dental treatments should not be a concerning part of your day. Learn the skills that will enable you to take control of these situations and make dental extractions easy

Speakers
AF

Aaron Forsayeth

Advanced Animal Dentistry
Aaron started his veterinary career in mixed practice at the Roma Veterinary Clinic in 1997. Here he was exposed to a wide range of things, not least of which dental procedures. Having received minimal formal training in any dentistry whilst at university, these initial experiences... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

The history of Torrens island quarantine 1850s to the present
From the earliest days Torrens Island was recognised as an ideal location for human and animal quarantine. Obviously close to the sea, isolated but a part of Adelaide, and in later years near to an international airport. The early history involved imports of dogs, cattle and pigs. During the 1920s the station also undertook the breeding of rabbits for hospitals. However it was only in the 1980s that more complex quarantines occurred. The scrapie accreditation program involved a 6-year program. Imported Angora goats and sheep were bred on the island to produce progeny that could then be released. At its peak 1300 hundred goats and sheep were run under intensive field conditions. Disease was a major problem. Major problems occurred with Cosccidia, Corynebacterium infection, sugar gum poisoning, fatty liver and spider syndrome. In 1986 Adelaide hosted the Sixth World Three Day Eventing championships. Streamlining Quarantine arrangements for this event was a forerunner for the Sydney Olympics. Until recently Torrens was the site for the first legal imports of fertile eggs. Its beginnings caused considerable controversy within the commercial industry. The presentation will also briefly touch on human quarantine events including its use as an internment camp during World War 1.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Chris Bunn

Dr Chris Bunn

Dr Chris Bunn graduated from Melbourne in 1967. His working life involved both State and Federal government positions. In 1985 he became the last veterinary officer to be employed at Torrens Island, to manage the Scrapie accreditation program for the next six years. The station also... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 16:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30 ACST

Gender and university differences in career sector and business intent of Australian veterinary students
We report on career sector and business intentions of veterinary students of five Australian veterinary programs between the years 2011 to 2014. The presentation will also describe differences to these intentions for gender and university. Data will be presented for student interest in pursuing government work, biosecurity or diagnostic laboratories, biomedical research and academia, not working as a veterinarian, intensive animal production, practice with large animals, companion animal practice and business ownership.

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Senior Lecturer in Business & Practice Management, The University of Adelaide
I started in emergency practice and continued for 24 years as a rural practice owner. My teaching and research interests are business and entrepreneurial capabilities for veterinary science students and also PNG women in agriculture.


Monday May 23, 2016 16:30 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

History SIG Annual Meeting
Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Flipped classroom use in veterinary education
This presentation is based on a multi-national study (Australia, USA, UK) investigating educators’ use and perceptions of the flipped classroom method to teach veterinary students. This teaching approach involves students working independently prior to class to grasp basic concepts using videos, texts and online resources, then participating in active, applied learning and problem solving exercises in class (King 1993, Lage, Platt and Treglia 2000; McDonald and Smith 2013). Use of this method is likely to be increasingly expected by both education providers and students as healthcare education methods shift towards greater use of online technologies and student-centred learning approaches (Prober and Khan 2013). This investigation provides insight into current techniques for flipped classroom teaching in veterinary education, together with educators’ perceptions of the opportunities, benefits and barriers to its implementation. The results generate baseline data for future comparison as the use of this method evolves in veterinary education, and are of immediate practical use to educators and institutions seeking to implement innovative teaching approaches in their curricula.

Speakers
SM

Susan Matthew

Associate Professor Susan Matthew is the Associate Chair of Veterinary Medical Education at Washington State University in the USA. Susan has a PhD in veterinary education and works collaboratively to lead international research and development of veterinary curricula, professional... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 08:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30 ACST

Mental practice: A tool for veterinary students to prepare for surgery
Surgical training is changing. In both human and veterinary spheres, surgery has traditionally been taught by the apprenticeship model, whereby students learn through repeated supervised practice. Advances in surgical technology, funding limitations and societal litigiousness, among other pressures, have made this ‘see one, do one, teach one’ approach difficult to implement. These pressures have led to the development of new tools to train the novice surgeon. One such emerging tool is mental practice. Mental practice is the use of visualisation to symbolically rehearse a physical task without external stimuli or executing the task itself. Mental practice enables surgery students to practice skills in a manner that requires minimal funding and physical resources. The application of mental practice in the field of human surgical training is growing and there is a potential for similar application in veterinary surgical training. Two studies were conducted comparing mental practice with textbook reading prior to performing surgery in veterinary students. The results of these studies identify that mental practice may be a useful technique for increasing confidence and promoting positive outcomes for surgical training in veterinary schools

Speakers
DC

Dr Charlotte Johnston

Charlotte Johnston graduated a Bachelor of Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Veterinary Science (Hons) at Charles Sturt University in 2015 and is currently based in Southern NSW as part of the Greencross Vets New Graduate program. Kellie Thomas is in her final year of a Bachelor of Bachelor... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:30 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Importance of professional capabilities to veterinary medicine students
Preparation of veterinary undergraduates for professional life is important for both the undergraduate and for the profession. Professional capabilities (those other than scientific understanding and clinical acumen) are acknowledged as important requirements to perform as a veterinarian. Educators are mandated by both universities and accrediting bodies to incorporate learning, teaching and assessment of such attributes in professional programs such as veterinary programs. However engagement in development of such attributes or attitudes by students during their university program is influenced by their motivation and their belief that they are important.   We report on findings from a study of veterinary students from five Australian veterinary programs over the years 2011 and 2014. Relationships of gender and other factors including age and year level (early, mid and late program) to veterinary student ranked importance of a range of professional capabilities will be described. The findings may be useful to veterinary educators for reflective practice on curriculum design and admissions policy 

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Senior Lecturer in Business & Practice Management, The University of Adelaide
I started in emergency practice and continued for 24 years as a rural practice owner. My teaching and research interests are business and entrepreneurial capabilities for veterinary science students and also PNG women in agriculture.


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 09:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30 ACST

2016 Excellence in Teaching award - winner to be announced. Topic: Final year veterinary para-clinical training through composite blended learning
Using composite blended learning to motivate and inspire final year veterinary students to adopt population based para-clinical training in their professional


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:30 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

VERA Poster Session: Fast paced 5 minute presentations on educational topics, including an update on the collaborative VetSetGO OLT projectPoster Session
Speakers
DJ

Dr Jen Hyams

Courses Director - Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University
Jen is a Senior Lecturer at Charles Sturt University and has recently moved from leading the Problem Based Learning program in veterinary science at CSU to a Course Director position within the Faculty of Science. Jen ihas responsibility for veterinary science and veterinary technology... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Use of reflective practice in veterinary undergraduate education
The ability to reflect on experience in order to maximise learning, and also identify areas of learning need are often cited as core professional values for veterinary surgeons, doctors and allied health professionals. The challenge of integrating reflective practice in to a crowded veterinary science curriculum is not insignificant. This presentation will focus on two instances of guided reflection for veterinary science students. The first is the use of Driscoll’s (1994) model of reflection (“what, so what, now what?”) applied to a learning situation for first year students. The second is a more demanding task for final year veterinary students, who are asked to provide a reflection on a clinical situation to which their peers can then respond via a discussion forum. This model is also expanded in to a mini clinical audit that students undertake. Fostering of reflective practice within workplace learning is thus made explicit. Driscoll, J. (1994). Reflective practice for practise. Senior Nurse, 14(1), 47

Speakers
DS

Dr Sarah Pollard-Williams

Sarah graduated from the UK, and spent several years working in companion animal practice, during which time she completed a Certificate in Veterinary Ophthalmology. After moving to Australia, Sarah spent 12 years working in regional Victoria. In 2011 she commenced at Charles Sturt... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Developing professional practice attributes using an innovative online learning resource
This presentation explains the scholarly development and evaluation of a novel online learning resource designed to develop students’ professional practice attributes. The resource is an integrated network of professional practice audiovisual-based learning objects (PABLO) that can be used as interchangeable blocks to challenge and progress students’ thinking and skills. The initial six PABLO cases focus on the core professional practice attributes of ethics, professionalism, communication, resilience and career management (Heath & Mills 2000; Leighton 2004). Analysis of published work, student surveys and interviews were used to identify challenging scenarios and develop real-life dialogue as the foundation for PABLO. These were brought to life using video vignettes integrated with engagement questions to challenge and progress students’ thinking and skills. The effectiveness of the resource was evaluated using student surveys, focus groups and usage patterns. Future plans include expansion of the PABLO scenarios and incorporation of face-to-face learning activities to create a blended approach that enhances student engagement and learning outcomes (Ellis & Goodyear 2010).

Speakers
SM

Susan Matthew

Associate Professor Susan Matthew is the Associate Chair of Veterinary Medical Education at Washington State University in the USA. Susan has a PhD in veterinary education and works collaboratively to lead international research and development of veterinary curricula, professional... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 15:00 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Veterinary education in wildlife and conservation medicine in Australasia
Veterinarians in practice and veterinary students are increasingly aware of the need to manage wildlife health at the individual level and at the population level for conservation outcomes, as well as emerging zoonotic diseases and biosecurity. Are we meeting these needs in the curricula of veterinary schools in Australia? For example, The AVA 2014 work survey shows 20.2% of all veterinarians work in some capacity with wildlife, birds and reptiles (c.f. dairy 2.6%, beef 4.8%, equine 6.5%). Given this comparatively extensive exposure to wildlife in practice, the ethical requirement to provide effective first aid for all species and considering future work opportunities are we providing veterinary students and veterinarians with a balanced training in wildlife health and conservation medicine? This presentation will discuss the present state of wildlife health and conservation medicine veterinary education in Australia, at both undergraduate and post graduate level, and what we may need to consider to give our graduates more work opportunities in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Wayne Boardman

Dr Wayne Boardman

Wayne Boardman, a Senior Lecturer in Wildlife and Conservation Medicine and Veterinary biosecurity at the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences on the Roseworthy Campus of the University of Adelaide, is a wildlife veterinarian and dedicated conservationist who has worked in the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 16:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30 ACST

Veterinary infection control: a mismatch between university and clinical placements
Extramural placements (EMPs) in private practice are an integral part of veterinary undergraduate training. Their purpose is to prepare students for professional life by enhancing their clinical and non-clinical skills. Previous research has shown that veterinary infection control (IC) needs to improve in Australia. The aim of this study was to survey final veterinary students from two Australian Universities in order to determine the role of EMPs in the development of IC skills. Students were asked questions about their zoonotic risk perceptions, their IC knowledge and their IC experiences during their EMPs. Most assessed zoonotic risks adequately and had a good knowledge of IC principles. However, some reported following substandard IC measures during their EMPs, despite identifying this as a problem. This was done to conform to the professional identity portrayed by their EMP mentors. To sustainably improve veterinary IC in Australia the quality of IC training during EMPs needs to be addressed

Speakers
MD

Ms Diana Mendez

Diana Mendez is a French veterinarian who has lived in Australia since 1996. She holds a Master of Public Health from James Cook University where she has worked as a researcher for 17 years on a variety of projects in the fields of wildlife diseases, zoonoses, infection control and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:30 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Framing supervisor views of veterinary student performance in the workplace
The competency of veterinary students in their final year is often assessed by rating their performance during training in the workplace, however little is known about what informs supervisor’s ratings. In this study, semi-structured interviews were analysed to characterise supervisor’s depictions of students they rated as excellent, marginal and weak. Twelve themes emerged from the data, with nine reflecting the following aspects of the student performance: engagement, trustworthiness, knowledge, application of knowledge, technical skills and animal handling, communication, social interactions, personal functioning and caring for animals. Three other themes went beyond descriptions of the student’s performance to involve the student’s destiny, impact on the supervisor, and the difficulty in judging their competency. For the most part, the themes discussed by supervisors aligned well with the themes in the marking scheme used for workplace assessments, but they differed in emphasis from the graduate outcomes for the programme

Speakers
DL

Dr Liz Norman

Liz came from a practice background to university clinical practice and is now the Assistant Dean for Assessment and Learning in the Institute of Veterinary, Animal, and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University and Director of the distance Master of Veterinary Medicine programme... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 17:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30 ACST

Developments in veterinary school accreditation locally and internationally
Changes have been occurring in the accreditation of veterinary schools since AVBC was established in 2000. In Australasia a new set of 12 accreditation standards apply from February 2015. These will be outlined. Internationally, members of the International Accreditors Working Group including Australia and New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the USA plus Canada now have adopted and adapted an accreditation matrix check list developed by the AVMA Council on Education to improve each of their accreditation processes. The manifold advantages arising from these developments for the profession, public and the veterinary schools will be outlined.
The Australasian Veterinary Boards’ Council has also supported moves to assure that standards applied in this region meet best practice. To this end, the AVBC accreditation process was invited to submit to the United States Department of Education for its Accreditation. It was accredited by the USDE as an approved veterinary programme accreditor along with the AVMA and the RCVS Education Committee. This is evidence that the AVBC accreditation policies, procedures and processes meet the highest international standards.
AVBC have also set a goal of interacting with veterinary schools and organisations in the Asian region to work together to develop veterinary accreditation standards in the region. Interest in veterinary accreditation in the region has been stimulated by the development of OIE minimum competencies for veterinary graduates and also the support by OIE for twinning programs to enhance the level of veterinary education

Speakers
NW

Norman Williamson

Australasian Veterinary Boards Council
Professor Norm Williamson graduated from Melbourne University in 1968 and did an MVSc in cattle reproductive health management and an MANZCVS in the medicine and preventive medicine of dairy cattle. He spent the 1980's as Professor of Theriogenology and Herd Health at the University... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:30 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Developments in animal ethics and initiatives to reduce animal use
It is not difficult to see that humans (and our veterinary patients) have benefitted from animal research conducted in the last few hundred years. However, alongside this progress, there has been increasing community concern internationally on the use of animals. On the whole, there is community support for animal use in research and teaching. However, this support comes with a condition to conduct it in an ethical manner, which in turn has created increasing demand for transparency in animal use.  Within the context of research and teaching, one of the main philosophical issues of animal ethics relates to balancing the relative interests of humans and non-human animals. The laws governing animal research and teaching attempt to achieve this balance. In Australia, this consists of state laws (such as the New South Wales Animal Research Act and Regulation) and a national Code (the Australian Code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes). This Code was established in 1969 on the initiative of the scientific community – the users of these animals. The Code requires all institutions involved in the use of animals for research or teaching to have an Animal Ethics Committee (AEC), whose responsibility it is to ensure that animal use is justified and that the principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) are adhered to.  This talk discusses the complexities of animal ethics at a large tertiary education and research institution, the strategies employed by the institution to manage and address associated challenges, and the role of the institution's Animal Welfare Veterinarian within this complex environment.

Speakers
DJ

Dr Jinny Oh

Dr Oh is a veterinarian who started in small animal general practice and completed a post-graduate internship at the University of Sydney. She is currently completing a Master of Business Administration degree at the Macquarie Graduate School of Management. She has spent the last... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

The financial impact of hydatid disease in Australian beef cattle
Hydatid disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus was introduced into Australia with domestic livestock and dogs during European settlement. Due to complete ignorance of the life cycle the parasite spread widely, soon becoming a major public health issue, leading to hospitalisation and deaths of many colonists. Echinococcus granulosus quickly established in wildlife cycling between dingoes and macropodid marsupials, particularly wallabies. More recently, through the development of dry dog food and the development of the highly efficacious cestocidal drug, praziquantel, E. granulosus has become less common in sheep and domestic dogs. Infection in definitive and intermediate wildlife hosts is high, particularly in the higher rainfall areas of eastern Australia. Hydatid disease remains common in cattle, particularly those grazed on pastures in alpine areas where wild dogs (dingoes and/or their hybrids with domestic dogs) co-inhabit. This study examined the financial impact of hydatid disease in a cohort of over 700,000 cattle slaughtered in a NSW abattoir between July 2013 and June 2015

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Feral cats: the greatest threat to Australia’s native mammals
Feral cats kill millions of native animals every night. Finding an effective strategy to neutralise the impact of cats is likely to be the single most important step in halting the decline of Australia’s threatened mammals. In the search for an effective feral cat control strategy, Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) has been undertaking Australia’s largest feral cat research program, delivering ground-breaking science which has led to major new discoveries about cats including new insights into their deadly interaction with wildfire and feral herbivores. Focused initially on AWC’s properties in the Kimberley, AWC’s research program involves the most detailed study ever undertaken of the density, impacts, ranging and hunting behaviour of feral cats. However, until an effective, landscape scale control strategy is developed – which may take decades – the only effective way to protect and restore populations of Australia’s most vulnerable mammals is to establish a national network of large feral predator-free areas. AWC is leading the way with plans for a 65,000 hectare feral predator-free area in central Australia – the planet’s largest (by area) removal of feral cats.

Speakers
avatar for John Kanowski

John Kanowski

National Science and Conservation Manager, Australian Wildlife Conservancy
Dr John Kanowski is a conservation and restoration ecologist with extensive experience in Australian ecosystems. John's PhD was in the ecology of rainforest possums and tree-kangaroos; subsequently, John worked as part of a research team investigating approaches to restoring biodiversity... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

Kangaroos and cataracts. Nutrition, health and welfare of hand reared orphan kangaroos.
This presentation will examine the role of nutrition in the development of cataracts in orphan hand reared kangaroos as well as general health and welfare. I will be presenting my latest research findings which have built upon my original research published in Nature. Although it has been generally accepted, as a result of my original research, that kangaroo joeys are lactose intolerant and develop diarrhoea when fed cow’s milk, my research findings that kangaroos are also unable to metabolise galactose and can therefore develop cataracts has not gained universal acceptance. This has been one of the reasons for the continuing debate about the most appropriate milk substitute for orphan kangaroos. Cataracts continue to be seen sporadically in hand reared kangaroos, anecdotally, especially in those fed milk substitutes high in galactose. This presentation, based on my latest research will clarify the situation. The presentation will also examine the welfare and ethical aspects of hand rearing orphan kangaroos

Speakers
TS

Tanya Stephens

Haberfield Veterinary Hospital
Tanya Stephens is a small animal practitioner who established her own practice and very much enjoys practice. She is also a wildlife researcher with original research on galactosaemia in kangaroos. Tanya’s interests lie in animal welfare, research, evidence based practice, professional... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30 ACST

Australian Veterinarians in Public Health (AVPH) Annual meeting
Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Food security, emerging infectious disease and our increasingly small planet
Delivering sufficient, safe, ethical and nutritious food in a sustainable manner to meet the requirements of future generations is one of the world’s greatest challenges. Over the past 10,000 years, the growing human and companion animal population has been sustained through the domestication of plant and animal species for use as food sources and the industrialisation of agricultural systems, without taking natural capital into account. A review of this strategy suggests that our modern systems are not necessarily optimal and, in some instances, are undermining the long-term food security and health of people and the planet. Intensification of livestock production systems has steadily increased since the mid-1880s and now dominates our global livestock food systems. It has contributed to the emergence, spread and maintenance of new disease agents through shifting ecological immunology, and increased interaction and movement of both people and their livestock. Simultaneously the diets of people and animals have changed leading to the double burden of under and over nutrition in people and companion animals.

Speakers
avatar for Robyn Alders

Robyn Alders

Principal Research Fellow, University of Sydney
Robyn Alders is an Associate Professor and Principal Research Fellow with the Faculty of Veterinary Science within the University of Sydney. For over 20 years, she has worked closely with smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa and SE Asia as a veterinarian, researcher and colleague... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Equine dentistry - what could possibly go wrong?
People will do more to avoid pain than gain pleasure. So if we can describe all the painful things that can go wrong in equine dentistry, we can plan to avoid them, and thus maximise the chance of getting a pleasurable experience for the horse, owner and veterinarian! The list is literally exhaustive, but can be split into the following headings: a) Getting the horse to stay still – clinical examination, sedation, nerve blocks. b) Examining and showing the problems to the owner – being able to examine properly and communicate with the owner is essential to gain the client’s confidence. c) Making the diagnosis accurately – there can be a lot of pathology hiding in the many nooks and crannies in the equine mouth, so a systematic method of listing the diagnoses and prioritising them can help to avoid negative outcomes. d) Treating the problems effectively and efficiently – whether you are extracting a cap, a wolf tooth, filing teeth, removing a tumour, medicating the sedated patient or opening a sinus, there are plenty of opportunities for iatrogenic damage, so plan well and aim to minimise this.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Liyou

Oliver Liyou

Director/Veterinarian, EVDS
Dr Oliver Liyou , through his equine practice, has hosted over 600 vets through his conducting over 40 equine dentistry post grad short courses since 2002. Through this, he has assisted many practices to develop and improve the equine dental side of their practices. He has also developed... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Lumps, bumps and weeping sores on horse's heads
Lumps, bumps and weeping sores on heads are very commonly encountered in equine populations, so learning how to investigate these is important for equine and mixed practice veterinarians. Having a list of differential diagnoses in your head before attending the patient, establishing a good history, performing a thorough distant and close physical examination, followed by a thorough internal and external oral examination are all essential. Additional diagnostic tools such as fine needle aspirate, biopsy, therapeutic trials, endoscopy, ultrasound, radiography, MRI, CT, Scintigraphy and Thermography are all possibly required to reach the definitive diagnosis and then offer the treatment options.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Liyou

Oliver Liyou

Director/Veterinarian, EVDS
Dr Oliver Liyou , through his equine practice, has hosted over 600 vets through his conducting over 40 equine dentistry post grad short courses since 2002. Through this, he has assisted many practices to develop and improve the equine dental side of their practices. He has also developed... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Dental homecare - What's new?
Dental home care is critically important for maintaining dental health in our pets as well as for ourselves. As vets we are able to actively remove all tartar and plaque during a dental procedure but without effective follow up homecare it will all rapidly recur and drive the progression and/or development of periodontal disease. Unfortunately effective dental home care has historically had very poor owner compliance because it is harder to convince a dog or cat that brushing is a good idea compared with people, although my three year old is also yet to be convinced. There are several new products that have the potential to greatly improve compliance by making homecare easier and less time consuming. After a brief summary of the historically available options for dental homecare we will discuss what has become available over the last few years. How do these products work, what is the evidence that they do what they claim to do and how should they be incorporated into what we recommend for dental home care to pet owners

Speakers
SC

Simon Craig

Simon graduated from Massey University in 1999 and then spent the last 15 years in general practise in Melbourne, England, Sydney and now Adelaide. He gained membership of the ANZCVS in Small Animal medicine in 2007 and then Small Animal Dentistry in 2008. He sees primary and referral... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

Setting up for rabbit dentals
Find out how to use what for what condition in the rabbit mouth. This talk will cover setting up the table, use of the hand tools and attachments for the dental machine for mouth examination, rabbit incisor extractions, coronal height reduction and molar extractions. Lighting, positioning and supportive care during the procedure will also be addressed

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Unusual dental conditions in rabbits
Although incisor malocclusion and dental abscess are regularly seen dental conditions in pet rabbits, other conditions may occur associated with the teeth. This talk will describe the diagnosis and treatment of some less common presentations that occur. These include jaw tumours and fractures, severed tongues and cheek abscessation

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Wild dental care: keeping zoo and exotic species smiling
While animals are kept in zoos or on display, their dental care becomes a vital part of their husbandry procedures. There are many challenges when dealing with unusual species which are vastly different from our domestic pets. The anatomy is often unknown or at least poorly described and publications are often by non-veterinarians. Sometimes two different publications will have two different descriptions of the dental and oral anatomy. A skull from the species to be treated should always be available if possible. Most frequently the veterinary dentist becomes involved when a keeper notices that something is wrong with the animal. Hopefully the zoo or park veterinarians are notified and a useful description of the condition can be available so an idea of what will be required and appropriate instrumentation selected. This is not always the case and dental treatment in the exotics can be very challenging

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre