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City Room 3 [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Avian orthopaedics
Birds, both wild and pet, are frequently presented to veterinary practice for repair. This presentation discusses how fractures in birds heal and how, with this knowledge, a clinician can assess a fracture, determine the best means of repairing it, and then utilise a range of techniques to obtain a good result. These techniques include external coaptation, intramedullary pinning, external skeletal fixation, and a combination of these methods. The decision as to which method to choose is based on the bird's purpose (e.g. rehabilitating a wild bird vs repairing a pet cockatoo, the location of the fracture, the bird's general health, and the skill of the clinician. By the end of this presentation a clinician will understand the concepts of fracture repair in birds and the ranges of means available for doing so

Speakers
avatar for Bob Doneley

Bob Doneley

UPAV Committee, School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland
Bob Doneley graduated from the University of Queensland in 1982. After working as an associate veterinarian/locum in practices in Queensland and the UK, he opened his own practice in 1988. He sold this practice in 2010 to take up the role of Head of the Small Animal Hospital at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Avian soft tissue surgery
Avian soft tissue surgery is an important skill for any avian practitioner. While standard surgical techniques – attention to haemostasis, gentle tissue handling, good suture selection – apply, birds have a slightly different skin structure that requires some specific changes. Certain groups of birds, such as parrots, have particular foibles that need to be considered post-surgically as well. Knowledge of the appropriate anatomy is imperative.
Common soft tissue surgery procedures include:
• laceration repairs
• crop burn fistulae repair
• ingluviotomy for foreign bodies or access to more distal gastrointestinal sites
• pododermatitis debridement and repair
• superficial lump removals
• digit amputations
• and cloacal prolapse.
Entry procedures for exploratory coeliotomy will be discussed, but not more complex procedures. Analgesia, including local anaesthesia will be briefly covered

Speakers
DM

Deborah Monks

Brisbane Bird and Exotics Veterinary Service
Graduating in 1995, Deborah completed her Avian Membership in 1999, then commenced a dual recognised avian residency in 2002. She passed both her Fellowship and Diplomate examinations in Avian Medicine in 2006, becoming a recognised Avian Specialist. She has also gained her Certificate... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Thinking outside the pouch – Medicine of marsupials
Marsupials are commonly presented as sick, injured and orphaned wildlife. They are held in pretty much all zoos and wildlife parks in Australia for display and conservation breeding programs, are maintained by some research institutions, and in some jurisdictions are kept as pets. Veterinary care of marsupials has many similarities to domestic animals and exotic pets. However, there are notable differences in anatomy, physiology, diet, and biology that influence the common disease presentations, the approach to treatment, and requirements for hospitalisation and supportive care. This presentation will discuss the approach to the marsupial patient, the diagnosis and management of common diseases, preventative medicine, and general considerations of providing veterinary care to marsupials, with emphasis on macropods, possums, koalas and wombats. Specific topics will include restraint and anaesthesia, sample collection, drug therapy, capture myopathy and dental disease in macropods, gastrointestinal and skin disease in possums, infectious diseases and trauma of koalas, dental disease and sarcoptic mange in wombats, management of burned marsupials, and common problems of orphaned joeys

Speakers
avatar for Dr David McLelland

Dr David McLelland

Veterinarian, Zoos South Australia
David McLelland received his BVSc from Sydney University in 2001, and did a BSc(Vet) in 2000 investigating an encephalomyocarditis vaccine in animals at Taronga Zoo. After two years in practice in Darwin he moved to Canada to undertake a DVSc residency in Zoo Medicine and Pathology... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Unusual pet surgical selection
General practitioners are often unsure how to proceed when presented with a small mammal or reptile surgical case. A range of small mammal and reptile surgical cases will be presented to compare and contrast the surgical management of these species with more familiar species seen in practice. Be entertained and go home with practical surgical tips for unusual pets.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Carmel

Brendan Carmel

UPAV Rep, FASAVA Committee, Warranwood Veterinary Centre
Dr Carmel works in a small animal practice in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne where over 90% of the caseload are unusual pets. He is the co-founder and current president of the Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians special interest group of the AVA; the President of the Unusual... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Lumps and bumps in legged reptiles
An overview of the clinical signs, diagnosis, causes and treatment of the assorted types of mass lesions that can affect lizards, turtles and crocodiles. Real cases examples will be used to highlight and demonstrate what's involved in treating these amazing animals and the myriad of lumps and bumps that they can develop

Speakers
avatar for Shane Simpson

Shane Simpson

Director, Karingal Veterinary Hospital
Dr Shane Simpson is a partner at Karingal Veterinary Hospital located south-east of Melbourne. He has a special interest in reptile and amphibian medicine and surgery with the majority of his clinical work now involving these fascinating animals. He regularly presents on this subject... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

GnRH agonist use in unusual and avian pets
GnRH agonists suppress sex hormones and have traditionally been used to treat hormone-related diseases. Diseases such as ovarian cysts in guinea pigs and adrenal disease in ferrets have traditionally been treated surgically, but the advent of longer-acting GnRH agonists such as leuprolide injections and deslorelin implants have allowed them to be managed medically when appropriate. More recently, GnRH agonists have also been used to manage hormone-related behavioural problems such as aggression, hypersexuality and feather-plucking in species that are difficult to routinely desex, eg. birds and reptiles. The mechanism of action, duration of action and appropriateness of GnRH agonists for these different diseases and species will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Shangzhe Xie

Dr Shangzhe Xie

Exotic Pets Referral Veterinarian/Surgical Coordinating Veterinarian, Adelaide Veterinary Specialist and Referral Centre
Dr Shangzhe Xie has been working as a veterinarian within exotics referral practices since his graduation from Murdoch University in 2008. Shangzhe also completed a Masters of Veterinary Studies in Conservation Medicine degree from 2009-2010. After completing the Masters degree, Shangzhe... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Less frequent indicators of poor health and welfare in ruminants
While studying animal-based measures to be included in the welfare assessment protocols, researchers often identify potential welfare indicators that do not fulfil the standards. This could be due to low prevalence, ambiguous meaning, lack of inter-observer repeatability, or unknown or controversial validity. For example, stereotypies (repetitive, topographically invariant response sequences that appear to lack any ultimate or proximal function) are often detected in intensively kept ruminants but the welfare significance of these is not clear. The most frequent examples of oral stereotypic behaviour in ruminants are “tongue-playing” observed mostly in heifers and cows, and biting at fences, walls or troughs, which are common in sheep, goats and calves. Another example to be presented is cross and inter-sucking that is relatively common in some dairy farms and has profound implications in udder health. Other examples in small ruminants’ farms are certain agonistic behaviours, isolation from the herd, obliviousness etc… Additionally Qualitive Behaviour Assessment (QBA) will be discussed as a potential positive welfare indicator

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

What is the role of the farm animal clinician?
The change in roles for most farm animal clinicians from treating individual sick animals to working at a herd / flock preventive level has been obvious and widely recognised. Farm animal clinicians may also have roles as educators, facilitators, counsellors, advocates, researchers or even enforcers. These potential complex roles generate a) ethical questions: whose interests are clinicians working towards? b) practical questions : how do we better communicate to achieve these goals? and c) financial questions : How can veterinary practices derive income from these new roles ? Given the information explosion, it seems impossible for vets to retain the reputation as the single authoritative source of animal health and welfare knowledge, perhaps clients primarily need support in synthesising and reviewing existing knowledge. Recent work has also highlighted the potential for valuing innovation and research undertaken by groups of farmers. In this context vets could have a role in supporting the production of practice-based evidence rather than simply disseminating evidence-based medicine

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Ethical and economical reasons for pain management
Why is pain management important in farm animals? First there is an ethical and professional duty that has to be complied. Not only consumers but owners and farmers are increasingly conscious of animal sentience and the physical and mental consequences of pain and will look suspiciously towards vets that do not adopt minimal pain management procedures. But more importantly there is sufficient evidence that chronic pain is associated with sub-optimal performance, higher susceptibility to infectious disease, reduce product quality… It should be clear for vets and farmers that not recognizing signs in ruminants does not mean that there is no pain. We will review definitions and recall pain physiology – transmission, perception, modulation and thresholds – so that its effects on body functioning are sufficiently clear. We will present studies that have shown that effective pain management is strongly correlated with better performance (e.g. yield and fertility) by dairy and beef ruminants. Finally we will also discuss the constrains and limits – cost, residues, lack of knowledge – associated with the use of analgesia in production animals

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Influencing our clients: What is possible and ethical?
Given that many veterinarians wish to improve the welfare of animals in their care, motivating clients to change husbandry can be a daily challenge. Encouraging uptake of best practice can be important for the health of the animal (e.g. canine obesity), for the profitability of the farmer (e.g. dairy cattle lameness) or public health (e.g. reduction in antimicrobial use). In human medicine a well validated approach called motivational interviewing has been shown to have a positive impact on health related lifestyle changes, such as diet, smoking and alcohol. The technique has been developed to be applicable to a ten minute consultations so is potentially relevant in veterinary medicine. Preliminary data on its potential application to UK farm animal clinicians will be presented. Alongside the potential for encouraging the uptake of best practice this session will also explore the ethics of influencing clients. For example would clients be comfortable knowing that we are training veterinary students in influencing skills? Can and should we use these new techniques to “sell” more products and services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Lameness in small ruminants – economical and welfare impact
Lameness is admittedly one of the most important cause of poor welfare in ruminants. For adequate management of lameness in a herd several issues should be address. First of all a validated grading scale should be used. Traditionally numerical rating scales (NRS) have been used but are associated with a reduced sensitivity to capture variations in lower levels of lameness. On the contrary visual analogue scales (VAS) are more sensitive although perhaps more subjective. By using these scales on farm it is possible to efficiently monitor the prevalence and evolution of lameness in a flock and to calculate its welfare and economic impact. Although the physiopathology of small ruminants foot diseases are generally well know, there is still a lack of knowledge on the effect of lameness on other structures such as joints and on the degree of pain present. We have conducted several studies on claw overgrowth and deformation and on the role these conditions can have on the incidence of other diseases such as pregnancy toxaemia. Other studies have looked at ways to recognize and score pain in sheep affected by foot rot. For example, facial expression has proven to be a reliable and easy way to recognize animals in pain

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30 ACST

Cross-fostering in the critically endangered brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata)
Cross-fostering in macropods was first described 50 years ago and is now being used as a conservation tool for the critically endangered brush-tailed rock-wallaby. Advantage is taken of the BTRW’s diapause joey, resulting from a mating within 24 hours of birth and then activation of a 28 day pregnancy, when suckling ceases. Pouch young are removed at 14 – 28 days of age from the conscious donor while the surrogate yellow-footed rock-wallaby is being anaesthetised and her similar aged pouch young is being euthanased. The same teat must be used for the cross-foster and is guided into the donor pouch young mouth using fine forceps. The BTRW young stays in the pouch for about the same time as the surrogate’s natural young. There appear to be no adverse behavioural traits in the cross-fostered young and they have successfully bred with their own species. Two out of three cross fosters result in young at foot but not all failures can be attributed to the procedure itself. This procedure has doubled the population growth rate of the species and has allowed a captive population to become established

Speakers
DD

Dr David Schultz

David Schultz graduated from Sydney University at the end of 1966 and was the first full time veterinarian at the Adelaide Zoo. It was a conservation ethic that drew him to the zoo initially in 1984 and he has been associated with the organisation and all its foibles ever since


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:30 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Reintroduction of the western quoll (idnya) to South Australia
Rabbits remain one of Australia’s most significant pest animals, even at extremely low abundance. Returning a native rabbit predator to fox baited reserves was proposed to assist managing this unsustainable over-grazing by pest rabbits. In South Australia, the largest mammalian carnivore legally possible in the Flinders Ranges was the western quoll (Dasyurus geoffroii). This native predator was lost from the region in the 1880s. A bold conservation program is returning the western quoll to the unfenced Ikara Flinders Ranges National Park (SA). After 6 years of planning 42 quolls, almost all from south-west Western Australia, were released in 2014 and another 37 this year. This project has been a very successful collaborative effort between state governments and a non-government Foundation. FAME (Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species Inc) is sourcing the significant funding required, with the quolls, almost entirely sourced by WA Department of Parks and Wildlife, released onto a reserve that the SA Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources has been fox baiting for over 20 years. This reserve is now co-managed with its traditional Adnyamathanha owners, for which the western quoll (idnya) is very important. Into this partnership has been added the expertise of Zoos SA, undertaking autopsies of dead quolls to assist identification of the primary cause of mortality (feral cats), rearing orphaned babies and treating injuries. In this presentation I will outline the reintroduction process, from sourcing historical accounts to justify the proposal to having quolls born on the Ikara Flinders Ranges National Park for the first time in about 130 years. My Zoos SA colleague Ian Smith will in his talk then highlight the crucial role wildlife vets have played in the project, especially in the critical phase of establishing the new population. During this extremely vulnerable period when saving as many animals as possible to breed can make an exponential difference, the veterinary contribution of Zoos SA has been invaluable. This talk seeks to both highlight an amazing conservation project as well as the value, both ways, in collaborations between ecologists and wildlife vets

Speakers
DD

Dr David Peacock

David has worked for the State Government for over 20 years. Formerly a national park ranger, his life changed direction when he experienced first-hand the impact and benefits of the new rabbit biocontrol agent rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) on the Flinders Ranges National... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 17:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

The effect of shearing on sheep feeding and behaviour
Sheep for live export may be shorn in the immediate period before shipping, to limit wool cover and so improve heat loss. Shearing can contribute to increased stress, and there are concerns this may lead to inappetance. In this study, 600 sheep were fitted with Radio Frequency Identification tags detected by antennae, to determine time and frequency of feed and water trough attendance. The sheep were shorn on day 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, and compared to an unshorn group. Ethograms were generated through analysis of video footage of the sheep taken one hour after shearing. There was no difference in time spent at feed or water troughs between any treatment groups on any day, nor any behavioural states or events. This suggests that shearing may occur on any day during the pre-embarkation feedlot period, and that current management practices do not disrupt time spent feeding

Speakers
TC

Teresa Collins

Murdoch University
Teresa Collins is a veterinary and PhD graduate from Sydney University. After some years in practice, she moved west, where she lectures in Animal Welfare and Ethics at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Murdoch University. Teresa has completed membership and examined for the Animal... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Treating peri-urban small ruminants
Small ruminants are very popular pets and companion animals. Owners commonly seek high quality individual medicine and surgery for these pets just as they would for their other companion animals. These owners are found everywhere, though in my experience most often encountered on “hobby farms” in peri-urban areas. These owners may come from a livestock back ground, though more commonly they have little experience. They commonly are starving for an eager veterinarian to help them learn and provide them with advice. We will focus on high quality individual animal medicine and surgery for sheep, goats, and South American camelids. I hope to build the confidence of the veterinarians that may be hesitant to see the family pet alpaca, and also to exchange some tips with the seasoned show sheep veterinarians. Integrating individual animal small ruminant medicine can be very rewarding to your practice. We will cover a wide range of topics including sedation, urolithiasis, gastrointestinal parasites and dystocia including caesarean section success tips.

Speakers
DB

Dr Brandon Fraser

Dr. Brandon Fraser is a specialist veterinarian as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine- Large Animal. Currently he is a large animal clinician and the director of the Gatton Campus Farm Animal Ambulatory Service at the University of Queensland. He received... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Small lot holders,their biosecurity risk and strategies to reduce their risk
Rural Australia has experienced a demographic shift in the last forty years where there has been a move from a landscape dominated by large commercial family farms, to one we now see which includes large farms interspersed with rural residential properties and weekenders. The peri-urban or small lot holders (SLH), form part of our rural landscape and bring with them a diversity that enriches and strengthens rural communities. They have for many years been regarded as a high biosecurity risk. Their lack of farming background and subsequent level of knowledge, especially of biosecurity practices, puts them at risk for the introduction and spread of exotic disease and pests. Although they potentially lack experience in certain areas, many are also knowledge seekers and are motivated to “do the right thing” by their animals and neighbours. The main concerns from this sector include the lack of biosecurity knowledge and the amount of informal trading of sheep, cattle and pigs. Informal trading means traceability is compromised and will slow or hinder control in the event of an emergency animal disease (EAD) outbreak. Any focus in the area should aim to increase compliance and must include the pig trading small lot holder as this is a particularly high risk for the introduction and establishment of Foot and Mouth disease (FMD). The lack of investment in this small lot holder extension requires a coordinated response from all relevant stake holders, to ensure better use of existing scant resources. This paper will summarise some of the strategies formulated in a workshop held in 2015 in Melbourne.

Speakers
DP

Dr Patrick Kluver

Patrick has a wealth of experience in endemic and exotic disease control. This includes carrying out research into Johne’s disease for the Victorian Government, and working as a lecturer in sheep medicine and production at the University of Melbourne Veterinary School for five years... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 09:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30 ACST

Panel Discussion
Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:30 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Organic farming, better for you and the planet?
The technological mindset that would dump billions of pounds of deadly chemicals into the soil, and mix the genetic material of different species, and build factory farms where livestock are treated like industrial commodities … has a deeply arrogant view of the natural world. It regards Nature as something to be conquered and controlled for short term profit.1
"The greatest catastrophe that the human race could face this century is not global warming but a global conversion to ‘organic farming'-an estimated 2 billion people would perish.

Speakers
BW

Bruce Watt

central tablelands local land services
Bruce graduated from University of Sydney 1976, completing a combined Masters and Residency program in food animal medicine at Kansas State University in 1978 . In 1980, he began at the University of Melbourne, including working with Dr Fred Morley to establish a health and production... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:00 ACST

Organic farming in the Falkland Islands. What lessons have been learned?
Until recently 35% of the Falkland Islands land mass was certified organic under the Australian Certified Organics scheme. The choice to enter the scheme was largely pragmatic due to the low requirement for chemical inputs due to such things as the previous eradication of lice and keds on the islands. On the other hand whilst fertiliser would be highly beneficial the high cost of transportation to the islands makes it unfeasible on any substantial scale. In seven years many lessons have been learnt about how to produce organic wool. Many difficulties have been faced such as controlling internal parasites, while other issues arising on organic farms have driven them out of the scheme such as the lack of ability to control noxious weeds. The limitations of the organics scheme standards is discussed in light of the practicalities of farming in the Falkland Islands whilst acknowledging the benefits organics has added to farming practices. The inconsistencies in standards internationally are also discussed and the implications this has on how functional the schemes are within each country

Speakers
DS

Dr Susan Swaney

Technical services livestock, Virbac
Susan Swaney has worked for Virbac in the Livestock Department as a technical services manager since 2011. Prior to this she spent three years in the Falkland Islands working as a veterinary officer for the Falkland Island Department of Agriculture. From 1985-2007 she ran a practice... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:00 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

Influence of soil ecology on animal health and welfare
Soil ecology is a major determinant of animal health and welfare through its influence on the quality and quantity of nutrition available to grazing livestock. Our understanding of this and the role we have will be discussed using examples

Speakers
avatar for Colin Trengove

Colin Trengove

Lecturer Production Animal Health, University of Adelaide
Colin is a lecturer in ruminant health and production at the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Roseworthy campus, University of Adelaide. He is a graduate of Murdoch Uni in 1979; MVS from Melbourne Uni in 1991; and working on a PhD from Adelaide Uni in 2019. A career interest... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Acupuncture for common conditions in cattle and other ruminants
Acupuncture may be utilized in a variety of conditions and integrated into your ruminant practice. We will focus on common conditions, and common acupuncture points. Unfortunately one cannot learn this new skill set in one session. This session will demonstrate the value of integrating acupuncture into the care of your ruminant species. It is great if you are already utilizing acupuncture in your companion animal patients. This session will provide you opportunities to expand your acupuncture service into various ruminant species and scenarios. Various conditions will be discussed including, lameness, nerve injury, musculoskeletal injury, reproductive performance, and gastrointestinal conditions. For example, acupuncture can be utilized in dairy cattle with reproductive problems, show animals that are stiff and uncomfortable, rams that are lame, are neonates with diarrhoea. This session will present acupuncture as another tool in your arsenal against disease and pestilence. Acupuncture is not intended as a substitute for you current therapeutics. This session is intended to be more geared to the new ruminant acupuncturist. Suggested points and series of favourite points and generic guidelines will be given. I always feel recipes and guidelines are meant to be tailored to the individual

Speakers
DB

Dr Brandon Fraser

Dr. Brandon Fraser is a specialist veterinarian as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine- Large Animal. Currently he is a large animal clinician and the director of the Gatton Campus Farm Animal Ambulatory Service at the University of Queensland. He received... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Feeding cats: the role of raw diets in sickness & in health
This lecture will discuss a holistic approach to feeding cats which incorporates consideration of behaviour and welfare as well as nutritional and dental requirements. Although there is no clear scientific evidence base for feeding ‘natural’ food, common sense in considering the evolutionary predatory behaviour of cats, and the important domains of behaviour and mental state in animal welfare assessment, suggest that feeding cats some raw meat on the bone may have many benefits. There are potential concerns with this practice, however, and skill and experience is required to do this safely. There are also situations in certain disease states where feeding raw meat may be initially contraindicated, whilst there are other disease states where feeding as a form of environmental enrichment may provide additional benefits. This lecture aims to provide a sensible, safe and practical approach of incorporating raw food into cats diets for maximal benefit with the minimal risk, and by doing so enhancing the welfare of pet cats

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Harvey

Andrea Harvey

Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine
Dr Andrea Harvey graduated from University of Bristol, UK in 2000, and became an ECVIM diplomate and RCVS Specialist in Feline Medicine in 2005. After moving to Australia she decided to pursue her other passion of equine welfare, enrolling in a PhD studying the behavioural ecology... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Getting One Health to work: A public health perspective
Love it or hate it the One Health movement is gaining momentum and likely to be here to stay, for at least the remainder of my working life. There are a plethora of One Health courses and programs at universities around the world and the concept is even embedded as a core principle in future planning for veterinary education in the US. However, in the rush to embrace One Health have we lost some clarity about what it is we are pursuing and where it fits amongst other competing concepts? This presentation will provide a real-life example of how the principles of One Health have been applied to assist the development of a national strategy to control leptospirosis in Fiji. The successful process taken in Fiji has shaped our thinking on what One Health is and how to apply it in practice. It also clearly showed us the need to go beyond the traditional “Venn diagram” definition if we are going to get it beyond an academic exercise

Speakers
avatar for Simon Reid

Simon Reid

University of Queensland
Associate Professor Simon Reid is a keen advocate of One Health, which is an emerging international field of research and practice integrating human, animal and ecosystem health to address health hazards at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. His formal training was in Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 09:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

The nutritional management of feline diabetes — an evolutionary perspective
Increasingly, cats are being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (80% — 95% Type II Feline Diabetes Mellitus — FDM). This presentation explores the role food-type plays in the etiology of this increasingly common problem. The presentation begins with a brief overview of diabetes as a metabolic disease, with varying degrees of declining insulin secretion & sensitivity, leading to its classification as either type I or type II. Recognized risk factors for FDM include age, obesity, gender, inactivity, drugs, systemic disease and genetic predisposition, while diet type is generally a minor consideration. Numerous studies confirm type II DM as a degeneration process involving mitochondria. The relationship between mitochondrial (Mt) function (determining organelle in cellular metabolism), health, diet and FDM is explored. Metabolic and related problems arising from non-evolutionary diets, where the principal energy source is carbohydrate include hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia (initially), caloric excess, obesity, lipid accumulation, lipid toxicity, inflammatory cytokines and increased ROS and NO production. Each of these is linked to Mt pathology, including Mt biogenesis, Mt morphology, Mt membrane damage, Mt DNA damage and declining oxidative phosphorylation. Each of these pathological changes is further linked to insulin resistance, declining beta cell function and amyloidosis. This sequence of events (pathophysiology of FDM) provides strong evidence for, and explains why, clinical experience favours diets closer to the evolutionary norm to both prevent and treat (all forms of) FDM. This presentation argues against feeding cats with food, where the principal energy source is carbohydrate, and presents the case for evolution-based (genome appropriate) nutrition as the obvious preventative programme and management tool for — all forms — of FDM

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Billinghurst

Dr. Billinghurst is a graduate of Sydney University graduating B.Sc.Agr. in 1966 — majoring in agronomy and nutrition — and B.V.Sc. (Hons) in 1976. He has spent his entire veterinary career in small animal practice, where he has researched the role of nutrition as it relates to... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Understanding the vets role in providing services to organic farms
The Australian organic farming has increased at 15 % per year and is 1 of the top five Australian growth industries. To date most vets have poorly serviced this industry. Australia’s standards are some of the most stringent in the world. -What does it mean to be certified organic? -What is the difference between Biological, Biodynamic and Organic systems? -What are allowable/restricted/nonallowable veterinary products and procedures?-What are the consequences to individual animals/farms when non allowable products/procedures are used? -How can vets usefully service organic farms? -What are alternate modalities to treat organic herds? -Where to find specialist advice? All this and more will be revealed

Speakers
DC

Dr Cathie Harvey

Cathie graduated from Murdoch University in 1983. She worked in small animal practice and soon moved to Narrung to manage a dairy on her husband’s farm. Here was the beginning of 30 years working, managing and maintaining the health of a 300 head dairy farm. This experience gained... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:00 ACST

Integrative Veterinarians Australia (IVA) Annual meeting
Thursday May 26, 2016 13:00 - 14:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

Why vets should be aware of Ebolaviruses
Over the past 18 months we have experience the largest recorded Ebola virus outbreak. The source of this virus in humans for this outbreak is thought to be bats, however domestic and wild animals have been associated with previous outbreaks of filoviruses. Pigs have been associated with Reston virus in the Philippines and hypothesised by several groups to be a potential source of Ebola virus in African outbreaks. Interestingly, although these viruses do not cause disease in pigs, infected animals shed virus from the respiratory tract and efficiently transmit the virus to other animals and potentially humans. Due to this it is important that veterinarians as well as doctors are aware of Ebolaviruses.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Glenn Marsh

Dr Glenn Marsh

Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO
Dr Glenn Marsh is a senior research scientist at AAHL and Team leader for the Dangerous pathogens team. His major research interests are focused on the pathogenesis of emerging infectious disease threats including henipaviruses, ebolaviruses, coronaviruses and influenza virus. His... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

A practical introduction to equine phytotherapy (herbal medicine)
Equine veterinarians will be familiar with the wide spread use of herbs in horses. This can range from horses grazing plants with medicinal properties in the paddock and the folk use of herbs to herbal mixtures being prescribed by lay herbalists and veterinarians. Herbal medicine has emerged from the co-evolution of plants and animals. Phytotherapy integrates traditional plant lore with scientific knowledge of phytochemistry and clinical medicine. Equine veterinarians have a responsibility to have an understanding of the scope of herbal medicine, traditional concepts, herbal pharmacology, herbal pharmacy, safety and regulatory issues and evidence base in order to have informed discussions with clients and colleagues. Herbal medicine offers a broader range of options for the veterinarian when addressing the maintenance of health, physiological dysfunction and chronic disease. Practicing the art and science of herbal medicine can be pleasurable and professionally satisfying.  Herbal medicine is potentially a useful addition to the range of therapeutic options available to the veterinarian who treats horses

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Digging deeper - equine phytotherapy
Herbal medicine is deeply rooted in the relationships between the natural world, plants, humans and other animals. Herbal medicine has emerged from this co-evolution. Ancient traditions and cultures share similar concepts of health, vitality and disease. Metaphors from nature are used to describe these states of health and disease. The traditions of herbal medicine are empirical however there is a pharmacological basis for the traditional descriptions of plant medicines and actions. Modern herbal medicine (phytotherapy) integrates traditional knowledge, clinical skills and scientific understanding of medicinal plants. The systematic approach of phytotherapy includes the use of plant medicines for physiological enhancement and compensation. Scientific research is building the evidence base for phytotherapy, which includes studies in phytochemistry, veterinary ethnobotany, zoopharmacognosy and clinical trials. The materia medica of some herbs commonly used in horses are presented to demonstrate how the integration of scientific and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants provides a more rounded picture of the indications and safe use of medicinal plants

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre