Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Welfare [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Quality of life assessment in companion animals
Quality of life is a frequently used phrase in small animal practice. What does it actually mean? How can it be systematically assessed? Why would you want to assess quality of life? In this session, we will explore the theory and practice of quality of life assessment in order to understand the potential benefits and limitations of its systematic assessment. Unusually for many disciplines in veterinary science animal welfare has involved the use of many frameworks including five freedoms, three welfare definitions (mental, physical & natural), three R’s and five domains. These have been useful to guide assessment of animal welfare (science), moral obligations towards animals (ethics) and societal expectations (policy). It is argued here that quality of life assessment can help us understand these three critical issues for companion animals. This is particularly true with respect to the emerging field of palliative and hospice style care for companion animals. What is the welfare impact of extensive medical interventions at the end-of-life? How far should we go and to whose benefit? Should we regulate such services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Animal welfare governance: Changing roles of government and industry
Animal welfare policy in the UK has changed dramatically since the 1965 Brambell report. Despite this increased effort are the current governance arrangements fit for purpose? Do the changes seen in the UK and Europe have any wider relevance? Reflecting a wider global phenomena there has been a clear shift away from government to industry based policy in farm animal welfare. In some respects this has been beneficial for animal welfare because of the speed and capability for innovation in the market-place. However, for some issues government still has a role, including prosecution for cruelty, prohibition of certain systems and labelling products. The government funding of animal welfare science is also critically important. In the UK fundamental welfare science continues whereas policy-related research have been reduced dramatically. Has the EU stepped into the gap? Sometimes yes and sometimes no. By reviewing some exemplars of policy co-ordination, such as the Dairy Welfare Strategy, this presentation will attempt to understand how veterinarians can contribute to effective animal welfare governance

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Use of animal based measures for assessing farm-animal welfare
The first reports published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) tried to identify environment and management indicators of poor welfare, because this approach corresponded to a quick and easy assessment. Consequently most European legislation on farm animal welfare was supported on these resource-based indicators. However, good management and access to an adequate environment do not necessarily result in a high standard of welfare. More recently the advantages of measuring welfare through animal-based indicators – the way in which the animal itself responds and copes with its surroundings – have become evident. In this paper we will review the process of testing animal-based indicators for validity (Does it measure what we think it measures? Does it relate to the animals experience?), reliability (Would it be recorded in the same way by more than one assessor? Would the same assessor record it in the same way on more than one occasion?) and feasibility (Can it be measured on farm in a reasonable manner?)

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Welfare quality and AWIN welfare assessment protocols for ruminants
Welfare assessment requires a multidimensional approach corresponding to a multi-criteria evaluation. To develop a practical tool that delivers an overall view of welfare, different specific indicators need to be integrated into an assessment protocol. In 2009 the Welfare Quality project re-elaborated the concept of the traditional “Five Freedoms” and defined four main areas of concern (“Welfare Principles”) – Good feeding; Good housing; Good health; Appropriate behaviour expression – which were then split into twelve criteria each of which corresponded to a key welfare dimension. Criteria should be independent of each other and form an exhaustive, but minimal list. Two large European projects have recently studied and integrated welfare indicators to produce assessment protocols for most production animal species. The Welfare Quality (2009) project addressed both dairy and beef cattle and the AWIN project produced protocols for sheep and goats (2015). In this paper we will present the different protocols and discuss the applicability and constrains encountered when applying them

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats in South Australia- science, policy and public opinion.
Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats will soon be regulated in South Australia. The aim of this talk will be to provide some background into the policy leading to the legislative change. In dogs, the aim is to reduce the number of dog attacks in the community, while in cats better population management may lead to reduced numbers of cats taken to shelters. The changes in South Australia are an interesting case study of the intersection of scientific evidence, policy and public opinion. Public opinion had a large part to play, with a Citizen Jury making the final recommendation to the Minister. However, the decision is not without controversy, and some of the more hotly debated implications will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Susan Hazel

Susan Hazel

Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide
Susan Hazel is a veterinary graduate from the University of Sydney. She is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide and teaches in animal behaviour, welfare and ethics. Susan is a Member of 2 South Australian Animal Ethics Committees... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Animal welfare and profitable farming
Increasingly, consumers expect animal welfare to be part of the core of farm animal production and will avoid products which they view as not fulfilling minimum conditions. Examples of this pressure and of consumers withdrawing their support for certain types of production are available worldwide. So, farming counter to public concern is nowadays unsustainable. However, assessing and ratifying welfare has shown to be not only essential in these certification schemes for consumers and in legislation enforcement, but also a useful tool in clinical, management and economical decision making. Measurement is a fundamental component of management and supervision. It is obvious that animals with poor welfare have suboptimal performances or demand artificial ways of maintaining health and production (e.g. antimicrobials). By assessing welfare through a well built and comprehensive protocol, it is possible to early identify sub-clinical disease, health risk factors and reasons for low yield, reduced growth or high mortality. It is also an excellent way to discern and monitor disease prevalence, such as lameness. In this paper we will present examples of good welfare as a way to guarantee animal health and farm profit

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Ag-gag laws for Australia? Implications for livestock industries and the public's right to know
Ag-gag legislation can be broadly described as any law or legal instrument, which in form or operation, has the effect of impeding public and political communication about agricultural practices, particularly relating to the treatment of animals. Such laws have been vigorously pursued in the United States as a means of addressing the increased use of private surveillance devices to expose cases of farm animal cruelty. Some legislators in Australia are now pursuing a similar legislative agenda. This presentation will review the nature of ag-gag laws, the debate in the US, and the proposals for Australia. The potential long-term implications for livestock industries will be considered and alternative strategies to achieve the same ends will be proposed.

Speakers
JG

Jed Goodfellow

Dr Jed Goodfellow is the Senior Policy Officer at RSPCA Australia and a Lecturer in Animal Law at Macquarie University. He recently completed his PhD thesis examining the animal welfare regulatory framework within the Australian agricultural sector. Prior to undertaking his postgraduate... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Genotypic and phenotypic resistance and resilience of sheep to gastro-intestinal parasitism
Selection for genetic resistance and resilience to gastro-intestinal worms is established practice in the Australian sheep industry. Genetic resistance is mediated by host immune response which has been shown to be a significant contributor to reduced growth rate in scourworm infections in sheep. Several questions of practical importance arise:  Can  selection for resistance inadvertently reduce productivity of meat sheep ?: Are there differences in the cost of the immune response between lambs that differ in their potential to limit worm infection (resistance)?: If so, is the cost influenced by co-selection for increased growth rate in the presence of infection (resilience)?  There are two mechanisms to address these questions, namely review of industry genetic and productivity data, and structured experimentation in known genetic lines of sheep. This presentation draws the available information together, defines undisputable knowledge, attempts to identify questionable assumptions, and assembles thoughts on what we need to know to underpin ongoing efficient selection for resistance and resilience to worm infections in sheep.

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Carmichael

Dr Ian Carmichael graduated in Veterinary Science from Melbourne University in 1967 and was awarded a DVSc from the University of Pretoria, South Africa in 1990. He worked in Africa and Asia for two decades as a specialist research scientist in government and corporate educational... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Less frequent indicators of poor health and welfare in ruminants
While studying animal-based measures to be included in the welfare assessment protocols, researchers often identify potential welfare indicators that do not fulfil the standards. This could be due to low prevalence, ambiguous meaning, lack of inter-observer repeatability, or unknown or controversial validity. For example, stereotypies (repetitive, topographically invariant response sequences that appear to lack any ultimate or proximal function) are often detected in intensively kept ruminants but the welfare significance of these is not clear. The most frequent examples of oral stereotypic behaviour in ruminants are “tongue-playing” observed mostly in heifers and cows, and biting at fences, walls or troughs, which are common in sheep, goats and calves. Another example to be presented is cross and inter-sucking that is relatively common in some dairy farms and has profound implications in udder health. Other examples in small ruminants’ farms are certain agonistic behaviours, isolation from the herd, obliviousness etc… Additionally Qualitive Behaviour Assessment (QBA) will be discussed as a potential positive welfare indicator

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

What is the role of the farm animal clinician?
The change in roles for most farm animal clinicians from treating individual sick animals to working at a herd / flock preventive level has been obvious and widely recognised. Farm animal clinicians may also have roles as educators, facilitators, counsellors, advocates, researchers or even enforcers. These potential complex roles generate a) ethical questions: whose interests are clinicians working towards? b) practical questions : how do we better communicate to achieve these goals? and c) financial questions : How can veterinary practices derive income from these new roles ? Given the information explosion, it seems impossible for vets to retain the reputation as the single authoritative source of animal health and welfare knowledge, perhaps clients primarily need support in synthesising and reviewing existing knowledge. Recent work has also highlighted the potential for valuing innovation and research undertaken by groups of farmers. In this context vets could have a role in supporting the production of practice-based evidence rather than simply disseminating evidence-based medicine

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Ethical and economical reasons for pain management
Why is pain management important in farm animals? First there is an ethical and professional duty that has to be complied. Not only consumers but owners and farmers are increasingly conscious of animal sentience and the physical and mental consequences of pain and will look suspiciously towards vets that do not adopt minimal pain management procedures. But more importantly there is sufficient evidence that chronic pain is associated with sub-optimal performance, higher susceptibility to infectious disease, reduce product quality… It should be clear for vets and farmers that not recognizing signs in ruminants does not mean that there is no pain. We will review definitions and recall pain physiology – transmission, perception, modulation and thresholds – so that its effects on body functioning are sufficiently clear. We will present studies that have shown that effective pain management is strongly correlated with better performance (e.g. yield and fertility) by dairy and beef ruminants. Finally we will also discuss the constrains and limits – cost, residues, lack of knowledge – associated with the use of analgesia in production animals

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Do animals know what’s good for them? - Aligning animal preferences and their biological needs in welfare studies
As animal welfare has become an increasingly important issue, there has been a focus on what constitutes animal welfare and how we can measure it. One approach has been to try to measure how the animal itself perceives its situation. Another approach has been to measure the biological function of the animal, through changes in physiology or health. Animal preferences may provide some insight into how an animal perceives its situation through indicating which of two or more choices it desires. However, the question is often asked – ‘Is this particular preferred choice good for them?’ This paper examines what we know about the links between animal preferences and their biological needs

Speakers
avatar for Professor Andrew Fisher

Professor Andrew Fisher

Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria
Andrew Fisher worked in practice in Colac in Victoria and in northern England. After a PhD in beef cattle health in Dublin, he worked for five years with AgResearch in New Zealand, conducting research aimed at improving dairy cow management. In 2002, Andrew joined the CSIRO, and researched... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Influencing our clients: What is possible and ethical?
Given that many veterinarians wish to improve the welfare of animals in their care, motivating clients to change husbandry can be a daily challenge. Encouraging uptake of best practice can be important for the health of the animal (e.g. canine obesity), for the profitability of the farmer (e.g. dairy cattle lameness) or public health (e.g. reduction in antimicrobial use). In human medicine a well validated approach called motivational interviewing has been shown to have a positive impact on health related lifestyle changes, such as diet, smoking and alcohol. The technique has been developed to be applicable to a ten minute consultations so is potentially relevant in veterinary medicine. Preliminary data on its potential application to UK farm animal clinicians will be presented. Alongside the potential for encouraging the uptake of best practice this session will also explore the ethics of influencing clients. For example would clients be comfortable knowing that we are training veterinary students in influencing skills? Can and should we use these new techniques to “sell” more products and services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

One health, culling [wildlife] and the common good
One Health recognizes that the health of humans and non-human animals are interlinked through our shared environment. One Health differs from traditional approaches to zoonotic risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread valorisation and adoption of One Health, culling domestic animals and wildlife remains a key component of institutional responses to animal-borne infectious disease. Using the threats posed by Hendra virus [HeV], bovine tuberculosis [bTB] and highly pathogenic avian influenza [HPAI] viruses as case examples, I explore how culling and other standard control measures for animal-borne infectious disease might be justified as part of One Health approaches. The purpose is to further nascent discussions about the ethical dimensions of One Health and begin to describe the principles around which a public health agenda that truly seeks to co-promote human and nonhuman health could potentially begin to be implemented

Speakers
DC

Dr Chris Degeling

Dr Chris Degeling is a health social scientist, philosopher, and veterinarian who works in the social studies and ethics of public health. At the completion of his PhD (2009) he undertook a further 18 months training in qualitative research methods and population health intervention... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Lameness in small ruminants – economical and welfare impact
Lameness is admittedly one of the most important cause of poor welfare in ruminants. For adequate management of lameness in a herd several issues should be address. First of all a validated grading scale should be used. Traditionally numerical rating scales (NRS) have been used but are associated with a reduced sensitivity to capture variations in lower levels of lameness. On the contrary visual analogue scales (VAS) are more sensitive although perhaps more subjective. By using these scales on farm it is possible to efficiently monitor the prevalence and evolution of lameness in a flock and to calculate its welfare and economic impact. Although the physiopathology of small ruminants foot diseases are generally well know, there is still a lack of knowledge on the effect of lameness on other structures such as joints and on the degree of pain present. We have conducted several studies on claw overgrowth and deformation and on the role these conditions can have on the incidence of other diseases such as pregnancy toxaemia. Other studies have looked at ways to recognize and score pain in sheep affected by foot rot. For example, facial expression has proven to be a reliable and easy way to recognize animals in pain

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

The effect of shearing on sheep feeding and behaviour
Sheep for live export may be shorn in the immediate period before shipping, to limit wool cover and so improve heat loss. Shearing can contribute to increased stress, and there are concerns this may lead to inappetance. In this study, 600 sheep were fitted with Radio Frequency Identification tags detected by antennae, to determine time and frequency of feed and water trough attendance. The sheep were shorn on day 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, and compared to an unshorn group. Ethograms were generated through analysis of video footage of the sheep taken one hour after shearing. There was no difference in time spent at feed or water troughs between any treatment groups on any day, nor any behavioural states or events. This suggests that shearing may occur on any day during the pre-embarkation feedlot period, and that current management practices do not disrupt time spent feeding

Speakers
TC

Teresa Collins

Murdoch University
Teresa Collins is a veterinary and PhD graduate from Sydney University. After some years in practice, she moved west, where she lectures in Animal Welfare and Ethics at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Murdoch University. Teresa has completed membership and examined for the Animal... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Family violence and the family pet: The role of the vet in early intervention
The presentation will outline the facts in relation to Family Violence and will outline statistics relevant to pets involved in Family Violence. The speakers will explain the Family Violence provisions history in the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) historically and currently. The speakers will outline the Family Law Act in general, and will specifically explain the provisions relating to animals. The presentation will outline the Royal Commission into Family Violence and explain the submissions made by the RSPCA. The presentation will then explain the services offered to victims of Family Violence and the gap in services in regard to animals. The speakers will discuss what services are available to animals and future plans funded by the Victorian government to establish women’s refuges that accept pets. The speakers will discuss Family Violence training which has been undertaken by many city Councils across Victoria and will explore how veterinary practices can establish protocols to identify symptoms of abuse in pets and respond accordingly.

Speakers
MA

Ms Amelia Beveridge

Amelia has had experience in all areas of Family Law including parenting matters, property matters and international matters. Amelia has also had experience with assisting the firm’s Independent Children’s Lawyers in complex parenting matters. Amelia has a keen interest in animal... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Making connections between human and animal directed violence, aggression and cruelty
Presented by Heather Fraser
This session focuses on “The Link” between animal and human directed cruelty, abuse and aggression, and also explores the possibility of humans and animals working together to mediate against the effects of such violence. After outlining research into “The Link”, I present my own (collaborative) work which considers some of the promising responses to acknowledgment of human-animal violence links, particularly regarding the feasibility of cross-sector - i.e. animal and human welfare sectors - reporting of abuse, already implemented in north America and the UK. I then discuss the potential of animal assisted therapies in mediating the negative effects of domestic violence and sexual abuse for humans. After noting some of the ethical and practical considerations of incorporating animals into therapeutic activities for humans, I present my own (collaborative) research into whether, and how, animal assisted therapy programs might be used with young people to change attitudes to animals and thereby potentially contribute to breaking the cycle of violence to both humans and other animals

Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Role of veterinarians in cruelty cases
Veterinary surgeons in the UK are often asked to provide reports to courts describing factual observations and their expert opinion on the presence or absence of unnecessary suffering. Although experts are obliged to act on behalf of the court, the quality of expert witness reports has been recently criticised. This presentation will summarise a recent review of 42 expert witness reports that describes the approaches taken to the assessment of unnecessary suffering. Whilst most reports suitably described factual observations, there was significant variation in the opinions on suffering and the actions of the owner. Severity and duration of potential suffering was inconsistently included as was comments on the impact on either mental or physical state. The necessity of suffering was also often not included in the opinion. External references supporting the opinion of the expert was only provided in a minority of reports. There was evidence of disputes between experts concerning the definition of suffering, the significance of clinical findings and the relevance of different assessment methods. It is suggested that expert witness reports should include a systematic consideration of the animal’s mental and physical states, severity of harm, duration of harm and a commentary on the necessity of suffering as defined by legislation

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

10:30 ACST

Implementing best practice solutions for complex farm animal welfare challenges
Some animal welfare problems, such as lameness in dairy cattle, tail biting in pigs and injurious pecking in hens, exist of farms due to a complex mix of management and husbandry factors. These issues present a) technical challenges in the form of how to best solve the difficulty and b) motivational challenges in making this happen. Initial research projects working on these challenges focussed on the technical aspects and produced husbandry advisory tools that aimed to quantify the relative risk and therefore priority for each potential intervention. Whilst technically valid, these approaches that relied upon a top-down knowledge transfer approach, had minimal impact on existing practice. Subsequent projects (including the Healthy Feet Project) explored techniques such as facilitation and social marketing to stimulate change. In addition to smarter communication techniques some issues can be resolved by introducing market-place (or even legislation) requirements. Examples of the later include risk factors for injurious pecking that have been introduced into certification scheme requirements

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

How can certification schemes promote 'good life' and improve health?
Certification schemes that aim to provide an assurance on animal welfare have been developed in many countries. As part of a large collaborative project AssureWel, Bristol has been looking at methods to increase the potential welfare impact of schemes. As part of that work we have developed a set of four best practice principles that should help schemes deliver promotion of positive welfare (good life) and limit harms (minimise poor health outcomes). Firstly the scheme can operate a management system that co-ordinates scheme activities which actively promote improvement in animal welfare within participating farms. This management system should include the following generic steps: plan (establish the objectives including desired outcomes, scheme requirements and monitoring processes), do (implement scheme inspection systems and support structures), check (measure and monitor the process and results) and improve (take action to improve performance). Secondly the scheme should develop progressive resources and outcomes requirements that comply with relevant legislation, encourage the provision of opportunities valued by the animals, promote farm level continuous improvement in important welfare outcomes and require innovation not to compromise welfare goals. Thirdly the scheme should target its assessment and support resources on important welfare concerns. Activities should include assessment of relevant welfare requirements and outcomes, promoting interest amongst farmers in their management, ensuring technical advice is available and insisting on remedial action for those farmers with consistent poor outcomes. Finally by taking an evidence-based, participatory and transparent approach the scheme should also embrace external scrutiny and involvement. These principles certification schemes should help schemes adopt a systematic scheme level continuous improvement approach, as already used in quality and environmental certification schemes, to promote improvement at a farm level. These principles could also inform the development of an international agreed standard that could facilitate trade in higher animal welfare products

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

Urolithiasis in Ruminants – Prevention and Management
An understanding of the aetiology of urolithiasis has virtually eliminated the condition in large commercial beef feedlots. However, the condition still occurs in opportunity feedlots and in lamb feedlots. The reasons for this can lie in prior supplementation history and the mineral concentrations of stock water in extensive grazing systems prior to introduction to concentrate feeding, inappropriate diet formulations, the feeding of concentrates separate to roughage, and possibly in extended feeding periods associated with inadequate dietary nutrient density and poor feeding practices

Speakers
avatar for Paul Cusack

Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a fellow of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Professor with the Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre