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Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Tongue worm (Linguatula serrata) a rarely seen veterinary curiosity
Linguatula serrata is a parasite found in several parts of the world, commonly in the Middle East. It is parasite of dogs and foxes (definitive hosts), residing in nasal cavities, with a range of herbivorous species acting as intermediate hosts. The intermediate nymphal stage resides in the mesenteric lymph nodes. The adult parasite is large with females reaching up to 14 cm and males 1-2 cm. It is also a zoonosis and humans may act as definitive or intermediate host. This parasite has rarely been found in Australia (10 reports in 200 years) and is commonly thought to be nothing more than a veterinary curiosity. Recent studies in wildlife (wild dogs (dingoes and dingo/domestic dog hybrids and foxes and in livestock (cattle) have revealed this parasite is far from rare. Wildlife survey data will be presented together with data on the morphology of the adult and nymphal stages. Transmission in wildlife and the risks to infection in domestic dogs will be discussed

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

Advancing the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia
This paper will discuss initiatives by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA), the objective of which is to take a lighter touch regulatory approach to product registration. The initiatives will reduce the burden on industry in complying with regulatory requirements and be proportionate to the risks being managed while continuing to deliver regulatory decisions that are timely and science-based.
The revised regulatory approach to registration consists of the following four elements:
1) The introduction of a profiling tool that will determine the appropriate level of regulatory intervention for applications. Online self-assessment may be adequate for applications requiring less regulation whereas an expert assessment tailored to each product may be required for applications posing a higher risk to humans and/or target animals.
2) The assessment of applications for product registration will take into account relevant international data, assessments, standards, and decisions, in accordance with the guiding principles of the Government Competitiveness Agenda.
3) The development of chemical monographs, risk manuals, and standards for certain product types that pose a negligible or low risk. A standard, for example, may define the chemical composition of a formulation, the target animal species for the formulated product, product claims, and labelling under which the APVMA would be satisfied to register a product. The registration of those applications that comply with the relevant standard will be fast-tracked.
4) The trialing of contestability of efficacy assessments that transfer efficacy assessments from the APVMA to private sector providers. If the current pilot study demonstrates advantages to the APVMA and the applicant, further consultation will be conducted as to the contestability of future efficacy assessments.
When fully implemented, these initiatives will help to advance the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Philip Reeves

Dr Philip Reeves

Chief Regulatory Scientist, Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority
Dr Phil Reeves is the APVMA Chief Scientist. He is responsible for ensuring the APVMA’s regulatory science frameworks and standards continue to meet appropriate national and international standards. Through engagement with national and international scientific and regulatory networks... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Evaluation of practices used to reduce the incidence of bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlots
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD)is a complex multifactorial disease that occurs commonly in feedlot cattle but is also increasingly being identified as a significant cause of losses in the rearing of dairy calves and in intensive beef grazing systems. Many BRD preventative practices have become commonplace in the absence of adequate supporting data. We will identify those practices for which there is substantial support to assist you in the design of BRD preventative programmes for your clients

Speakers
avatar for Paul Cusack

Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a fellow of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Professor with the Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Theileria molecular diagnostics, chemotherapy, epidemiology and immunology
After what had been considered the benign presence of the organism in Queensland cattle for more than a century, Bovine anaemia caused by the Theileria orientalis group became an emerging disease of cattle in north-east NSW, with a sharp increase in the number of clinical outbreaks from 2007 onwards. A group of stakeholders met in September 2009 to agree on a national case definition for the condition and extension of available knowledge, to prioritise research directions and projects, and to develop a national education and communication plan. The agreed broad areas of research were: the aetiology and transmission of the disease; the prevalence of the disease, the organism and its vector(s); diagnostics, therapy and economic impact. In the ensuing 6 years, Meat and Livestock Australia funded a suite of research projects into the condition. Molecular diagnostics enabled the discovery that more than one type of T orientalis were present and that the Ikeda type was consistently implicated in cases of clinical disease and was probably a relatively new arrival to the country. Buparvaquone was chosen as a candidate chemotherapeutic and residue assay and depletion data generated. Further research confirmed that Haemaphysalis longicornis was a biological vector of the infection in Australia, but that mechanical transmission by various means could not be ruled out

Speakers
JS

Johann Schroder

Johann Schröder After qualifying as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in South Africa and a short stint in mixed private practice, Dr Schröder joined the multi-national pharmaceutical industry and specialised in veterinary parasitology, in which he holds a Master’s degree. His industry... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 17:30 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30 ACST

Economic impact of endemic livestock diseases
Producer-funded animal health R&D in Australia is prioritised in part based on the estimated cost of the most important diseases. A survey of cattle and sheep diseases conducted in 2006 had served as a valuable tool for this purpose, but needed updating. A follow-up survey in 2014 estimated the cost of a number of endemic diseases considered to be economically damaging to the red meat industry (cattle, sheep and goats). The survey included producers, processors, government and industry representatives, as well as perusal of available literature. Assumptions of disease distribution, prevalence, production losses and costs of prevention and treatment were analysed in a spreadsheet-based model which estimated individual animal, herd/flock and national costs of each important disease. The 17 diseases of cattle, 23 of sheep and 8 of goats were further assessed in terms of knowledge gaps regarding their aetiology, prevention and treatment, and the threat each one posed in terms of geographic distribution and prevalence

Speakers
JS

Johann Schroder

Johann Schröder After qualifying as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in South Africa and a short stint in mixed private practice, Dr Schröder joined the multi-national pharmaceutical industry and specialised in veterinary parasitology, in which he holds a Master’s degree. His industry... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:30 - 18:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Rumen dynamics and ruminant physiology
We will build a schematic diagram of the rumen, and the production and utilisation of its fermentative end products. Our discussion will work through the clinical significance of ruminant physiology and biochemistry in the utilisation of the fermentative end products and the utilisation of nutrients that survive passage through the rumen. Biochemistry will be given meaning in a clinical context

Speakers
avatar for Paul Cusack

Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a fellow of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Professor with the Veterinary... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Antimicrobial resistance – Can we reverse the trend?
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is receiving global interest as an imminent threat, in which common infections could harm or kill again. AMR is also an emerging issue for Australia’s food and agriculture export industries as a potential, new technical barrier to trade. Fighting AMR is one of the strategic pillars for the Australian Veterinary Association and a joint focus of the Australian Government Departments of Agriculture and Water Resources, and Health. So significant is this issue that there have been calls to make AMR a national health or security priority in Australia, as has been done in other countries. The presentation aims to create awareness amongst Australian veterinarians and give a sense of the pace and energy of current international and national drivers, trends and mitigating actions towards AMR in animal and public health sectors. The presentation will also provide an opportunity for individual veterinarians to reflect whether their use of antibiotics could be modified, reviewed or updated in order to reduce the prospect for AMR in Australian animals and the broader community

Speakers
DL

Dr Leigh Nind

As a Principal Veterinary Officer within Epidemiology and One Health section of the Animal Health Policy Branch (Biosecurity Animal Division) of the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR), Leigh conducts activities to enhance the national approach... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Developments in animal ethics and initiatives to reduce animal use
It is not difficult to see that humans (and our veterinary patients) have benefitted from animal research conducted in the last few hundred years. However, alongside this progress, there has been increasing community concern internationally on the use of animals. On the whole, there is community support for animal use in research and teaching. However, this support comes with a condition to conduct it in an ethical manner, which in turn has created increasing demand for transparency in animal use.  Within the context of research and teaching, one of the main philosophical issues of animal ethics relates to balancing the relative interests of humans and non-human animals. The laws governing animal research and teaching attempt to achieve this balance. In Australia, this consists of state laws (such as the New South Wales Animal Research Act and Regulation) and a national Code (the Australian Code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes). This Code was established in 1969 on the initiative of the scientific community – the users of these animals. The Code requires all institutions involved in the use of animals for research or teaching to have an Animal Ethics Committee (AEC), whose responsibility it is to ensure that animal use is justified and that the principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) are adhered to.  This talk discusses the complexities of animal ethics at a large tertiary education and research institution, the strategies employed by the institution to manage and address associated challenges, and the role of the institution's Animal Welfare Veterinarian within this complex environment.

Speakers
DJ

Dr Jinny Oh

Dr Oh is a veterinarian who started in small animal general practice and completed a post-graduate internship at the University of Sydney. She is currently completing a Master of Business Administration degree at the Macquarie Graduate School of Management. She has spent the last... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

The financial impact of hydatid disease in Australian beef cattle
Hydatid disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus was introduced into Australia with domestic livestock and dogs during European settlement. Due to complete ignorance of the life cycle the parasite spread widely, soon becoming a major public health issue, leading to hospitalisation and deaths of many colonists. Echinococcus granulosus quickly established in wildlife cycling between dingoes and macropodid marsupials, particularly wallabies. More recently, through the development of dry dog food and the development of the highly efficacious cestocidal drug, praziquantel, E. granulosus has become less common in sheep and domestic dogs. Infection in definitive and intermediate wildlife hosts is high, particularly in the higher rainfall areas of eastern Australia. Hydatid disease remains common in cattle, particularly those grazed on pastures in alpine areas where wild dogs (dingoes and/or their hybrids with domestic dogs) co-inhabit. This study examined the financial impact of hydatid disease in a cohort of over 700,000 cattle slaughtered in a NSW abattoir between July 2013 and June 2015

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Building One Health partnerships
One Health recognizes that the health of humans, animals and ecosystems are interconnected. Collaboration or working together to achieve shared goals is essential to the concept of One Health. While there was a time when cross-sectoral collaboration was promoted primarily to address zoonoses (specifically highly pathogenic avian influenza), this presentation outlines how international regulations promoting agreed mechanisms for cross-sectoral collaboration now lend support to wider, practical applications of One Health.
FAO/OIE/WHO Guidelines outline a process to establish effective collaboration mechanisms based on recognised key supporting and operational elements which include; high-level commitment, common priorities, early involvement of all relevant partners, well defined roles, coordinated activity planning, routine communication, data sharing and joint training and exercises. This development of collaboration between government ministries is explored using country-specific examples. While appropriate mechanisms depend on country/cultural context, they are essential to sustainability of collaborative linkages beyond individual relationships
The importance of identifying shared goals and mutual benefits as well as addressing data confidentiality concerns are highlighted. You will be interested in this presentation if you are keen to share experiences and wish to see One Health embedded in your organisation’s culture

Speakers
DF

Dr Francette Geraghty-Dusan

Francette is an agricultural graduate and a veterinary epidemiologist. She feels privileged to have had an interesting and varied career spanning rural mixed-animal practice, urban small animal clinics, welfare work, work with the World Health Organisation in China, Laos and Fiji... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 08:30 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30 ACST

Clinical One Health: A formal role for veterinarians in medicine?

Thursday May 26, 2016 08:30 - 09:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Getting One Health to work: A public health perspective
Love it or hate it the One Health movement is gaining momentum and likely to be here to stay, for at least the remainder of my working life. There are a plethora of One Health courses and programs at universities around the world and the concept is even embedded as a core principle in future planning for veterinary education in the US. However, in the rush to embrace One Health have we lost some clarity about what it is we are pursuing and where it fits amongst other competing concepts? This presentation will provide a real-life example of how the principles of One Health have been applied to assist the development of a national strategy to control leptospirosis in Fiji. The successful process taken in Fiji has shaped our thinking on what One Health is and how to apply it in practice. It also clearly showed us the need to go beyond the traditional “Venn diagram” definition if we are going to get it beyond an academic exercise

Speakers
avatar for Simon Reid

Simon Reid

University of Queensland
Associate Professor Simon Reid is a keen advocate of One Health, which is an emerging international field of research and practice integrating human, animal and ecosystem health to address health hazards at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. His formal training was in Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 09:30 ACST
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30 ACST

One Health - A medical perspective
In Queensland, the formation of the Queensland One Health Group (QOHG), including veterinarians, environmental officers, industry representatives and medical staff, has enhanced communication between disciplines and improved understanding between the specialties with the aim of early recognition of threats to health. Although One Health is not a new concept, it is not often considered in medical practice. Six interlinked cases of canine and human Brucella suis infection highlight the use of One Health principles in medical practice. Other examples of One Health in practice include the impact of the 2011 Queensland floods on health, recognition of the importance of vector distributions in Queensland and consideration of the environment in the transmission of multi-resistant organisms

Speakers
DK

Dr Kathryn Wilks

Dr Kathryn Wilks started her career as a Veterinary Science graduate with an interest in the concept of “One Health”. This interest led to her undertaking a project in the Kimberley region investigating the dynamics of dogs in Aboriginal communities and the effect of a canine... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:30 - 10:00 ACST
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre