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Equine [clear filter]
Monday, May 23
 

08:15 ACST

Field techniques in equine anaesthesia
This discussion will cover the drugs, tools and techniques available to perform anaesthesia on equine adults and foals. In addition, this discussion will cover hot to manage the challenges associated with performing anaesthesia in field conditions, including monitoring techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15 ACST

New ideas and techniques in equine anaesthesia
There are very few new ideas in regards to equine anaesthesia. Although simple, traditional anaesthetic techniques are relatively safe, there is always room to improve our practices. This discussion will cover the newest drugs and equipment on the market for equine anaesthesia and why some of these products might improve your practice.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Penetrating injuries of the equine foot
Penetrating injuries of the Equine foot are relatively common and unique in their ability to be life threatening through synovial sepsis, typically of the navicular bursa.  This session will describe the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of such injuries in order to help practitioners improve their decision-making in such cases.  Simple penetrations include ‘nail bind’ and relatively superficial penetrations that invariably result in sub solar abscessation (foot abscess).  About 95 % of equine foot abscesses behave relatively predicatably in their clinical course, but there are about 5% of cases, which behave unpredictably and these can confuse even the most experienced practitioner!  This session will focus on the diagnosis and management of the more serious and deeper penetrations, i.e. those involving the distal interphalangeal joint, the navicular bursa, the digital flexor tendon sheath and also (rarely) the proximal interphalangeal joint.  We will focus on what to do and when to refer the case, along with discussion of what treatment is likely to occur in the referral hospital setting, including surgery and ancillary antibiotic delivery techniques.  The presentation will be illustrated with real clinical cases. Finally the session will reflect on the outcomes of such cases, both for survival and for future athletic performance.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Management of head and trunk wounds in horses
The aim of this presentation is to present a wide range of Equine wounds of the head and trunk, in order to describe some different wound management techniques and some of the intricacies of working in these areas in the large animal.  Whilst less common than limb lacerations and wounds, injuries of the head and trunk in horses pose a significant part of the Equine clinician’s caseload.  The types of head injuries that will be discussed range from fractures of the maxilla and mandible, along with those involving the tooth roots, paranasal sinuses, the poll and the calvarium. The management of such cases obviously needs to be multidisciplined, due to the varied anatomical structures that are involved with the wounds, along with the high energy associated with many of these traumas.  Trunk wounds described in this talk will range from small (but often deep) penetrations that can involve both the thoracic and abdominal cavities.  There will also be graphic examples of extensive lacerations involving almost the entire body and unhappily, mutilations associated with sadism.  Burn injuries associated with barn and bushfires will not be discussed, as they are beyond the scope of this presentation.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Western vs. Eastern concepts in equine pain management
We have not yet found a drug or technique that is 100% effective for treating and preventing pain in horses. Western medicine is incredibly important and useful when dealing with pain in horses. Unfortunately, the positive effect of every drug comes with the negative side effects. In some patients, the side effects cannot be tolerated. Eastern medicine techniques are an alternative option for those patients. Acupuncture, massage and herbal medicine can be offered in combination or alone depending on the patient and disease process. In addition to explaining the techniques and options available, current associated research and literature will be included in the discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Incorporating traditional eastern medicine into sport horse practice
Equine sports medicine has evolved in response to the needs of our equine athletes. The competition calendar is now year round for many equine athletes and the veterinarian is expected to maintain peak athletic performance in these animals while minimizing or avoiding pharmaceuticals. Eastern medicine techniques combine easily with an athlete’s maintenance program.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

08:00 ACST

Emergency management and transportation of the equine fracture patient
Equine fractures occur commonly enough in practice that there is an absolute requirement for the clinician to be aware of the appropriate first aid, splinting and transportation techniques available.  Furthermore they are often stressful situations for all, including the patient, owner/trainer and the practitioner!  Veterinarians are often being rushed into decision making in such circumstances, be it in the field or on the racecourse, which adds to the pressure of the situation.  In this presentation we firstly discuss how to make the diagnosis in the field and then specifically look at bandaging and splinting techniques of the various anatomical regions of the horses limbs.  Forelimb fractures are generally divided into four anatomical zones and hind limbs are divided into three zones, each of which has specific bandage/splint combination requirements that one must be aware of.  We will also look at some of the commercially available splints along with those made from commonly available resources and prepared in the field.  This is an important presentation, not only because of its welfare issue, but also because appropriate splinting and transportation of the fracture patient can prevent further trauma, improving the chance of a successful repair at a referral facility.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Bandages and casts in equine practice
Bandages and casts are an integral part of Equine orthopaedic practice, and the techniques that are employed range from simple to complex.  Bandaging is a good ‘day one’ skill to master, as it often serves as a ‘beach head’ when embarking in your early years of practice.

This presentation focuses on a wide range of bandaging techniques used in horses, both of the appendicular(limbs) and axial(body) skeleton.  Techniques and materials are explained with reference to commonly and less commonly available materials in Australia.  In this talk we’ll confront some of the more difficult areas of the body to cover with practical ‘how to’ type instructions.

The casting component of the presentation will detail the classification of equine casts used, the indications for such casts and also the step-by-step application of casts.  Complications associated with cast application in the horse are not uncommon.  Whilst the most complication is the pressure rub, some of these can be so severe that the complication itself outweighs the purpose for which the cast is applied!  The presentation is highly illustrated and tips and tricks of improving the quality of your casts will be explained.  If you have little experience in bandage or cast application in horses or simply want to improve your results, this presentation should be of value.

 

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30 ACST

Lower limb local anaesthesia in the horse: Techniques and interpretation
The 2 goals of this lecture is to spend time on how to perform a variety of lower limb diagnostic nerve and joint blocks including reviewing the relevant anatomy for each block. Then secondly will be interpretation of these blocks. A number of things can influence the outcome of a distal limb nerve or joint block including time after injection , volume of anaesthetic and location of needle placement and discussion will centre around how these can all result in what sometimes is an incorrect diagnosis. Examples of how things can be simple and complicated at the same time will be demonstrated using a variety of case examples. Blocks that will be discussed at length include the palmar digital block, abaxial block, low 4 point block, high 1 point in front and back legs, high 4 point, coffin joint block, pastern joint, fetlock joint, as well as carpal and tarsal joints

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Fulton

Ian is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists and specialist equine surgeon based at the Ballarat Veterinary Practice where he has been a partner for 23 years. Graduating from Melbourne University in 1983, Ian began practice in Kyabram, Victoria... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Equine joint therapy: How to decide what to use.
Veterinarians are confronted with a multitude of products that are rapidly being developed for the treatment and often prevention of degenerative joint disease in horses. To say this is a challenging situation, especially for the new graduates, is an understatement. While there are some treatments that have been around for a long time with well established efficacy, more recently a variety of products are on the market to challenge these. While some are still used via the intra-articular route, many are available as oral products or intra-muscular or intra-venous drugs. The decision as to what to use, how effective each drug is and also what evidence is available to support the claims of each product will be discussed.
While the proprietary products have established information many of the more recent drugs do not and in fact many are not registered for use in horses so choosing a safe and effective product is becoming a bigger challenge for the veterinarian

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Fulton

Ian is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists and specialist equine surgeon based at the Ballarat Veterinary Practice where he has been a partner for 23 years. Graduating from Melbourne University in 1983, Ian began practice in Kyabram, Victoria... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00 ACST

Interpreting the equine ECG
Electrocardiography (ECG) is used to examine the electrical activity of the heart. Portable ECG devices are now readily available for veterinary practitioners to use in the field. The acquisition of good quality traces is important to enable a correct diagnosis, especially during exercise when artifacts are common. Arrhythmias are a frequent finding in horses and may be physiological or pathological in nature. Vagally-induced, physiological arrhythmias may occur at rest and immediately after exercise. It is important to differentiate these from abnormal cardiac rhythms that may be of clinical significance because they can cause poor performance or predispose to collapse and / or sudden death. This presentation will explain how to successfully record and interpret ECGs in the horse, both at rest and during exercise

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00 ACST

Causes of poor performance in the equine athlete and the investigative approach to such cases
Horses are frequently presented for the investigation of poor athletic performance. However, this may present a diagnostic challenge to the veterinarian since many abnormalities are not immediately obvious on a resting examination. Indeed, there are many problems that the horse can cope with at low levels of competition but become manifest when athletic demands are increased. Clinical exercise testing is therefore frequently required in order to make a definitive diagnosis in horses presenting with exercise intolerance or poor athletic performance. It should be noted that poor performance is frequently multifactorial and hence a thorough investigation of each body system is warranted. This presentation will discuss the possible causes of poor performance and describe the diagnostic investigations that may be performed

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

08:00 ACST

Sedation and anaesthesia for foals and pregnant mares
Anaesthesia of the pregnant mare or neonate can be difficult for a new or experienced anesthetist due to the seasonal nature of breeding and foaling.   As soon as you feel comfortable using sedation or anaesthetics in this population, the season ends and you get about six months to forget everything you have learned.  A review of the basics  for this population every winter/early spring is useful to stay prepared.   A neonate is very sensitive to any painful stimulus, necessitating good handling techniques.  Neonates are sensitive to the vasodilatory properties of anaesthetics.  In addition, they are also prone to hypoglycemia and hypothermia.  Some anaesthetics require significant hepatic metabolism, prolonging the effects of the drug in a population of animals with immature hepatic function.  Anaesthesia of the pregnant mare should be focused on maintaining oxygenation and perfusion (as with any anaesthetic patient) but with extra care in the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative periods.   Mares have decreased bone density post foaling and require strength and assistance from anaesthesia.  Monitor blood electrolyte levels (supplementing calcium if needed) and assist recovery with ropes to avoid fracture.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Equine neuropathic pain and treatment options
Neuropathic pain can occur when a nerve is directly injured or when the nervous system is altered in chronic pain states. In these situations, the nerve is the source of pain and the nervous system propagates the condition. These are the typical cases that put owners and veterinarians in the uncomfortable position of making end of life decisions. The ability to recognize these conditions early and treat appropriately is crucial. Neuropathic syndromes and treatment options will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Surgical management of dynamic upper airway obstructions
Dynamic respiratory endoscopy (DRE) has been a major step forward in the diagnosis of airway problems in horses. DRE has revealed upper airway issues in horses to often be multi faceted and not as simple as we once thought. With this improved ability to understand the problem it has allowed for more targeted treatments to be undertaken. Post-operative use of DRE has lead to the critical evaluation of the efficacy of many treatments that in the past was impossible. With this critical evaluation many treatments have been modified and improved leading to improved or at a minimum more realistic outcomes. During this presentation multiple DRE examinations will be reviewed. Discussion of the benefits of standing versus dynamic examinations and what has been learnt from the comparison of the two will be discussed. Various upper airway dynamic exams will be used to illustrate the pros and cons of various treatment options. This will include laryngeal hemiplegia, DDSP, vocal cord collapse, pharyngeal wall collapse and others as time permits.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30 ACST

Fractures, what is now fixable and what still isn't
Fracture management in horses is still difficult. The initial management and evaluation of horses with a suspected fracture has been and still is extremely important. New and old stabilization options that are available, which influence case outcome will be briefly discussed. Fracture in horses from a mechanics point of view it is far more complicated than any other common species including humans in which repairs are performed. Due to these factors equine surgeons need to pay substantially more attention to biomechanical forces and how they are resisted during repair. Recent developments such as locking compression plate (LCP) technology have been a significant improvement in the equine surgeons armamentarium. These implants and improved patient management have allowed for significantly more fracture repairs to be attempted and more importantly to be successful. Adjunct options such as minimally invasive placement of repairs and improved treatment of infections, mostly by local delivery of antibiotics, have been large steps forward. A variety of fracture cases with discussion of different treatment options will be presented and discussed as time permits.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30 ACST

Causes of abnormal respiratory sounds in the exercising horse and their clinical significance
During normal breathing, very little audible sound is generated by the horse, especially during inspiration. However, obstructive conditions of the upper respiratory tract may result in abnormal sounds being produced as a result of air turbulence and vibration of the different collapsing structures within the airway. It has been proposed that the nature of the sound together with other information such as the time in the respiratory cycle that it occurs and whether the noise is intermittent or continuous may be helpful in diagnosing the cause of the condition. Indeed it is evident that, in practice, a diagnosis is often made on the grounds of the clinical history and the respiratory sounds produced. However, evaluation of respiratory sounds by ear may be difficult because of observer location (resulting in poor transfer of sound to the ear or superimposition of extraneous noise), limitations of hearing acuity and limitations imposed in differentiating between the sounds associated with different conditions. This presentation will cover the different sounds produced by the exercising horse and discuss their clinical significance

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Thursday, May 26
 

08:00 ACST

Diagnosis and treatment of the coughing horse
The cough reflex occurs as a result of stimulation of irritant receptors within the airways, in response to noxious or mechanical stimuli. The resulting forced exhalation will aid in the removal of mucus or any foreign body within the respiratory tract in an attempt to protect the lower airways from damage. Coughing is a non-specific indicator of respiratory disease and may occur as a result of a number of infectious and non-infectious causes affecting both the upper and lower airways. This presentation will focus on the most common non-infectious respiratory disorders affecting the horse, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and summer pasture associated recurrent airway obstruction (SPARAO). The relevance of these disorders in relation to Australian conditions will be discussed and details regarding diagnostic techniques (including sampling of respiratory fluids), pathophysiology and treatment (both environmental and pharmacologic) will be covered. In addition to lower airway disease, coughing may also be an indicator of some upper airway abnormalities, especially in non-racehorses. These conditions (including epiglottic abnormalities and dorsal displacement of the soft palate - DDSP) will also be discussed

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00 ACST

Large skin defects - surgical options
Horses regularly injure themselves and cause large skin defects that need to be managed by equine veterinarians. These wounds can take a long time, often months in some cases to heal. Equine veterinarians often do not fully pursue available surgical options to close these defects because of cost. When the cost of bandaging and associated treatment is taken into account then many options become attractive. An option that is uncommonly used are grafting techniques which can be surprisingly easy and cheap to perform and regularly result in significant improvements in the rate of closure. The principles of initial wound management and of plastic and reconstructive surgery will be reviewed with a focus on what works and what doesn’t to allow for improved management of large skin defects. A variety of cases will be presented and discussed to cover a range of size defects and anatomical locations. Tips and tricks that are useful to improve success will be highlighted throughout the cases.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30 ACST

Extracting horse teeth - tips, tricks and techniques
Being presented with a horse that requires a molar extraction is daunting. Careful planning as well as being aware of one’s abilities is essential. The range of instrumentation that will be needed is large and decisions have to be made as the whether the procedure can be performed in the standing, sedated horse or will the procedure require a general anaesthetic. Many things can and do go wrong and pre-planning for these is part of the process. What is required pre-operatively? What is the best sedation regime and which nerve blocks will aid in the process? Where can the procedure be done especially if it needs to progress to general anaesthesia. What will be the aftercare? How many x-rays should be taken? All of these considerations must be addressed

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00 ACST

Management of guttural pouch disorders
Guttural pouch (GP) disease in horses is an uncommon yet challenging clinical problem. Anatomy of this complicated structure will be reviewed along with a variety of diagnostic options. GP disease in Australia is mostly associated with foals in the form of tympany. The management of these cases from minor to severe and the range of conservative and surgical options presented. Techniques such as laser fenestration to gain access from the pharynx and GP septum fenestration will be demonstrated and discussed for difficult case management. The most common GP disease in adults in Australia is empyema and the associated chondroids. The management of these cases including conservative management options that are regularly successful will be presented. Uncommon in Australia but often misdiagnosed GP disease such as mycosis will be discussed with case presentation and management discussed. Rare neoplastic disease will be briefly discussed. The focus of this presentation will be diagnosis and an awareness of options that are available and the associated success rates.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00 ACST

When things go wrong under anaesthesia
After anesthetizing thousands of horses in one of the busiest equine surgical facilities in the world, I thought I had seen and dealt with everything. Unfortunately, horses continue to surprise me with new and strange things in induction, during general anesthesia and in recovery. In this discussion, I will share my experiences and insight into how to avoid mishaps and how to deal with them if they do occur.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00 ACST
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre
 
Friday, May 27
 

09:00 ACST

Equine Veterinarians Australia (EVA) 'Pre-Purchase Examination Workshop'
Whether you conduct an equine pre-purchase examination once a week, or once a month, this workshop is a must for you. You will learn all the tips and techniques for examination, and completion of the official, Guild approved form. This will help you avoid litigation from a disgruntled client.


The following topics will be covered in detail on the day:

The all new EVA - 5 Stage Pre-Purchase Examination video
Pre-Purchase Exam for the Sporthorse, Racehorse and Juvenile
Communication with the Purchaser and Vendor
Reporting abnormal Pre-Purchase findings
Pre-Purchase radiology, endoscopy and drug screening
How to avoid litigation
Interactive panel discussion

Registration for this event will include lunch, morning and afternoon tea, with attendees receiving a comprehensive pack of professionally printed workshop notes

AVA member: $395
SIG member :$295
AVA student or new graduate member: $195
Non-member: $80

Sponsors
avatar for Guild Insurance

Guild Insurance

Both Guild Insurance and GuildSuper have partnered with the AVA since 1996, providing veterinarians with quality protection in practice. Guild Insurance offer tailored insurance for both veterinarians and their practices. Through chairing a Risk Committee with the AVA and developing... Read More →



Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 16:00 ACST
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre