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Sunday, May 22
 

15:00

AVA Welcome Church Service
CB Howard Hall at Trinity City
Holy Trinity Historic Church http://trinitycity.org.au
87 North Terrace – across the road from the Convention Centre

All welcome to start the week with connection and reflection

No cost – attendance is free
Tea/coffee will be provided

Sunday May 22, 2016 15:00 - 17:00
Social Events

16:30

AVA Graduate Mentoring Program Meet and Greet Drinks and canapes
An opportunity for all our AVA mentors and mentees to catch up face to face in a relaxed, friendly environment.

$25.00 for AVA mentors and mentees

Sunday May 22, 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Social Events

18:00

Welcome reception and exhibition opening
Proudly sponsored by Love that Pet

Sunday May 22, 2016 18:00 - 20:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

20:00

Meet and Greet Dinner
(across the road from Intercontinental Hotel)

First time at an AVA Conference? Meet other delegates and make new friends at the start of the week. Includes a 2 course dinner and drinks. Meet at the Adelaide Convention Centre registration desk after the welcome reception or make your own way there..

Cost: $70 per person

Sunday May 22, 2016 20:00 - 22:00
Social Events
 
Monday, May 23
 

06:45

08:15

Field techniques in equine anaesthesia
This discussion will cover the drugs, tools and techniques available to perform anaesthesia on equine adults and foals. In addition, this discussion will cover hot to manage the challenges associated with performing anaesthesia in field conditions, including monitoring techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Avian orthopaedics
Birds, both wild and pet, are frequently presented to veterinary practice for repair. This presentation discusses how fractures in birds heal and how, with this knowledge, a clinician can assess a fracture, determine the best means of repairing it, and then utilise a range of techniques to obtain a good result. These techniques include external coaptation, intramedullary pinning, external skeletal fixation, and a combination of these methods. The decision as to which method to choose is based on the bird's purpose (e.g. rehabilitating a wild bird vs repairing a pet cockatoo, the location of the fracture, the bird's general health, and the skill of the clinician. By the end of this presentation a clinician will understand the concepts of fracture repair in birds and the ranges of means available for doing so

Speakers
avatar for Bob Doneley

Bob Doneley

UPAV Committee, School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland
Bob Doneley graduated from the University of Queensland in 1982. After working as an associate veterinarian/locum in practices in Queensland and the UK, he opened his own practice in 1988. He sold this practice in 2010 to take up the role of Head of the Small Animal Hospital at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

A Step-by-step guide to dental radiography
Dental radiographs can be taken by general practitioners through adapting their existing knowledge and practice. The equipment and techniques for producing a full mouth series of images will be covered. Whilst a dedicated dental X-ray machine and film is preferable and easier, some tips will be given on using standard X-ray equipment

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

veterinarian, Eurocoast Veterinary Centre
Dr Tara Cashman graduated from the University of Sydney in 1995, returning 2 years later to complete her Diploma in Veterinary Clinical Studies in Mixed Practice. Tara became interested in dentistry after working for a number of years in small animal/equine practice as she realised... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Phase I Rehab principles - Joint motion and early weightbearing
This presentation will cover early rehabilitation techniques for the acute postoperative or injured patient. Emphasis will be on joint and early weight-bearing exercises, including passive range of motion, stretching, and exercises to encourage early weight-bearing and limb use.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Four essential qualities of trusted leaders
Practice leaders have so much to do, so it’s easy to lose focus and spend time on the wrong activities. Effective leaders focus on those qualities and roles that build trust within the team and lead to improved employee performance. Attendees will leave knowing the 4 C’s that are qualities of trusted leaders-clarity, competency, caring and consistency. You will learn specific action steps to take in each category that will enhance productivity in your veterinary practice and create a positive work environment where everyone wants to come to work

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Quality of life assessment in companion animals
Quality of life is a frequently used phrase in small animal practice. What does it actually mean? How can it be systematically assessed? Why would you want to assess quality of life? In this session, we will explore the theory and practice of quality of life assessment in order to understand the potential benefits and limitations of its systematic assessment. Unusually for many disciplines in veterinary science animal welfare has involved the use of many frameworks including five freedoms, three welfare definitions (mental, physical & natural), three R’s and five domains. These have been useful to guide assessment of animal welfare (science), moral obligations towards animals (ethics) and societal expectations (policy). It is argued here that quality of life assessment can help us understand these three critical issues for companion animals. This is particularly true with respect to the emerging field of palliative and hospice style care for companion animals. What is the welfare impact of extensive medical interventions at the end-of-life? How far should we go and to whose benefit? Should we regulate such services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Tongue worm (Linguatula serrata) a rarely seen veterinary curiosity
Linguatula serrata is a parasite found in several parts of the world, commonly in the Middle East. It is parasite of dogs and foxes (definitive hosts), residing in nasal cavities, with a range of herbivorous species acting as intermediate hosts. The intermediate nymphal stage resides in the mesenteric lymph nodes. The adult parasite is large with females reaching up to 14 cm and males 1-2 cm. It is also a zoonosis and humans may act as definitive or intermediate host. This parasite has rarely been found in Australia (10 reports in 200 years) and is commonly thought to be nothing more than a veterinary curiosity. Recent studies in wildlife (wild dogs (dingoes and dingo/domestic dog hybrids and foxes and in livestock (cattle) have revealed this parasite is far from rare. Wildlife survey data will be presented together with data on the morphology of the adult and nymphal stages. Transmission in wildlife and the risks to infection in domestic dogs will be discussed

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:15

Head Cattle Vet 530,000 Bos indicus x, Northern Australia and 300,000 Angus, Russia
I worked for Stanbroke Pastoral Company from 1997 until 2003, when it was sold. During that time the herd expanded from 300,000 head to 530,000 head and my job title changed from VETERINARIAN to GENERAL MANAGER, LIVESTOCK HEALTH AND PRODUCTION, RESEARCH and RANGELANDS. The herd was predominantly Bos indicus x and the properties were mostly in northern Australia. By contrast, when working for Bryansk Meat Company in the south west of Russia, I started as ASSOCIATE VETERINARIAN and graduated to HEAD VETERINARIAN in the 6 months I was there, from September 2014 to May 2015. During that short period the herd expanded from 200,000 to 300,000 Angus cattle and from 28 to 33 farms. My presentation will cover productivity, disease, animal welfare and staff communication challenges for an Australian female veterinarian working in the dry tropics of the northern Australian cattle industry with 600 predominately male co-workers and in the temperate environment of Russia with 6000 predominantly male co-workers that did not speak English

Speakers
DS

Dr Sandi Jephcott

Beef cattle focus - Head Vet for biggest cattle company in the world, Stabbroke Pastoral Company, for 6 years; detoured into owning a mixed practice in Qld for 6 years then back on track - Head Vet for Bryansk Meat Company in Russia. Have been President of Australian Cattle Vets


Monday May 23, 2016 08:15 - 09:15
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

New ideas and techniques in equine anaesthesia
There are very few new ideas in regards to equine anaesthesia. Although simple, traditional anaesthetic techniques are relatively safe, there is always room to improve our practices. This discussion will cover the newest drugs and equipment on the market for equine anaesthesia and why some of these products might improve your practice.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Avian soft tissue surgery
Avian soft tissue surgery is an important skill for any avian practitioner. While standard surgical techniques – attention to haemostasis, gentle tissue handling, good suture selection – apply, birds have a slightly different skin structure that requires some specific changes. Certain groups of birds, such as parrots, have particular foibles that need to be considered post-surgically as well. Knowledge of the appropriate anatomy is imperative.
Common soft tissue surgery procedures include:
• laceration repairs
• crop burn fistulae repair
• ingluviotomy for foreign bodies or access to more distal gastrointestinal sites
• pododermatitis debridement and repair
• superficial lump removals
• digit amputations
• and cloacal prolapse.
Entry procedures for exploratory coeliotomy will be discussed, but not more complex procedures. Analgesia, including local anaesthesia will be briefly covered

Speakers
DM

Deborah Monks

Brisbane Bird and Exotics Veterinary Service
Graduating in 1995, Deborah completed her Avian Membership in 1999, then commenced a dual recognised avian residency in 2002. She passed both her Fellowship and Diplomate examinations in Avian Medicine in 2006, becoming a recognised Avian Specialist. She has also gained her Certificate... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Why work blind? Learn to interpret your dental radiographs
Dental radiography is an extension of the complete oral examination and should be considered an essential part of small animal dentistry. Normal radiographic anatomy of the dog and cat will be covered, followed by anatomical variations and common dental pathologies. Learn to use radiology to make your life easier and more efficient

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

veterinarian, Eurocoast Veterinary Centre
Dr Tara Cashman graduated from the University of Sydney in 1995, returning 2 years later to complete her Diploma in Veterinary Clinical Studies in Mixed Practice. Tara became interested in dentistry after working for a number of years in small animal/equine practice as she realised... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Phase II Rehab principles - Cardiovascular conditioning, proprioception, and limb use exercises
Intermediate rehabilitation exercises will be discussed in this lecture. Early cardiovascular conditioning and limb use exercises will be emphasized is part of a plan to encourage early return to function. In addition, proprioceptive exercises will be covered for both neurologic and orthopedic patients, including joint proprioceptive activities.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Using online tools to combat the growing competition in the pet care market
e are about to embark on the largest growth period the pet industry has seen - as we fall within the "life sciences" expected to be the largest global growth industry of the next 50 years. The growth in the pet industry is being driven by the increasing demands on pet care by owners - which will impact on vets directly. Because of this demand - and opportunity, competition is increasing. Here we’ll look at how vets can use online tools to keep one step ahead of the pack.

Looking at the competition, it’s the non-vets who will probably have the greatest impact. The rise of disruptive business models such as Uber is driven both by an excitement in the technology, “Hey, we can do this differently” but also an understanding that consumers are changing and the old models are not working.

Understanding customer (pet owner, farmer) behaviour is the key to better results - and online tools are key.

Speakers
avatar for Pet Pack

Pet Pack

Pet Pack
Dr James Ramsden graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1991. He’s worked around the world from Melbourne to Lexington, Kentucky. His interest lies in creating better communication to help people look after their animals better. He’s worked in traditional mass media and... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Animal welfare governance: Changing roles of government and industry
Animal welfare policy in the UK has changed dramatically since the 1965 Brambell report. Despite this increased effort are the current governance arrangements fit for purpose? Do the changes seen in the UK and Europe have any wider relevance? Reflecting a wider global phenomena there has been a clear shift away from government to industry based policy in farm animal welfare. In some respects this has been beneficial for animal welfare because of the speed and capability for innovation in the market-place. However, for some issues government still has a role, including prosecution for cruelty, prohibition of certain systems and labelling products. The government funding of animal welfare science is also critically important. In the UK fundamental welfare science continues whereas policy-related research have been reduced dramatically. Has the EU stepped into the gap? Sometimes yes and sometimes no. By reviewing some exemplars of policy co-ordination, such as the Dairy Welfare Strategy, this presentation will attempt to understand how veterinarians can contribute to effective animal welfare governance

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Advancing the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia
This paper will discuss initiatives by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA), the objective of which is to take a lighter touch regulatory approach to product registration. The initiatives will reduce the burden on industry in complying with regulatory requirements and be proportionate to the risks being managed while continuing to deliver regulatory decisions that are timely and science-based.
The revised regulatory approach to registration consists of the following four elements:
1) The introduction of a profiling tool that will determine the appropriate level of regulatory intervention for applications. Online self-assessment may be adequate for applications requiring less regulation whereas an expert assessment tailored to each product may be required for applications posing a higher risk to humans and/or target animals.
2) The assessment of applications for product registration will take into account relevant international data, assessments, standards, and decisions, in accordance with the guiding principles of the Government Competitiveness Agenda.
3) The development of chemical monographs, risk manuals, and standards for certain product types that pose a negligible or low risk. A standard, for example, may define the chemical composition of a formulation, the target animal species for the formulated product, product claims, and labelling under which the APVMA would be satisfied to register a product. The registration of those applications that comply with the relevant standard will be fast-tracked.
4) The trialing of contestability of efficacy assessments that transfer efficacy assessments from the APVMA to private sector providers. If the current pilot study demonstrates advantages to the APVMA and the applicant, further consultation will be conducted as to the contestability of future efficacy assessments.
When fully implemented, these initiatives will help to advance the regulation of veterinary medicines in Australia.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Philip Reeves

Dr Philip Reeves

Chief Regulatory Scientist, Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority
Dr Phil Reeves is the APVMA Chief Scientist. He is responsible for ensuring the APVMA’s regulatory science frameworks and standards continue to meet appropriate national and international standards. Through engagement with national and international scientific and regulatory networks... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:15

Preserving our animal health status: perspectives on animal health surveillance
Assurance in Australia’s animal health status underpins the ‘clean, green’ image of Australia’s animal industries and our competitive advantage in international markets. It also supports domestic consumer confidence in Australian livestock products. This presentation will outline the importance of animal health surveillance in supporting trade, mitigating the risk of serious disease outbreaks and (in the case of zoonotic diseases) safeguarding the health of people. It will explain the imperatives for surveillance in the face of a growing risk of disease emergence and the tendency for trading partners to demand more robust evidence in support of claims for disease freedom. It will also explore the challenges in getting the right sort of surveillance information to the right people at the right time. We face technical, social, economic and political issues that influence the people, policies, programs and information technology that constitute our surveillance system. Many would agree that surveillance is a shared responsibility of governments, livestock industries veterinarians and the wider community; yet we have long struggled to establish a coordinated national approach to surveillance. Against this backdrop of needs and challenges, the presentation will highlight opportunities afforded by modern technologies, the results of social research, shifting paradigms and the implementation of a National Animal Health Surveillance and Diagnostics Business Plan. The presenter will try to provoke discussion on how we might enhance partnerships, find mutual benefits and embrace new technologies to strengthen surveillance and protect the livestock production systems on which so many Australian’s depend

Speakers
DJ

Dr Jonathan Happold

Jonathan Happold was born in Nigeria and spent formative parts of his childhood in the wildlife parks of East Africa. He graduated as a veterinarian from the University of Sydney in 1998 and spent the next seven years in private practice in Australia and England. In 2005–2006 Jonathan... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 09:15 - 10:15
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:00

Accompanying guests' welcome morning tea
We invite accompanying guests to the welcome morning tea. Make friends and meet new people.

Complimentary

Monday May 23, 2016 10:00 - 11:00
Social Events

10:15

Morning tea
Monday May 23, 2016 10:15 - 10:45
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

10:45

Governor and Presidents Welcome followed by Plenary - The 'toll' of knowing you are sick: Implications for acute pain management and consequences for chronic agony
The "toll"of knowing you are sick:implications for acute pain management and consequences for chronic agony

Speakers
avatar for Professor Mark Hutchinson

Professor Mark Hutchinson

Professor Hutchinson is an ARC Australian Research Fellow and is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP). He is also a Professor within the School of Medicine at the University of Adelaide. Professor Hutchinson returned to the University of Adelaide... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 10:45 - 12:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

12:00

Lunch
Monday May 23, 2016 12:00 - 13:30
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Penetrating injuries of the equine foot
Penetrating injuries of the Equine foot are relatively common and unique in their ability to be life threatening through synovial sepsis, typically of the navicular bursa.  This session will describe the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of such injuries in order to help practitioners improve their decision-making in such cases.  Simple penetrations include ‘nail bind’ and relatively superficial penetrations that invariably result in sub solar abscessation (foot abscess).  About 95 % of equine foot abscesses behave relatively predicatably in their clinical course, but there are about 5% of cases, which behave unpredictably and these can confuse even the most experienced practitioner!  This session will focus on the diagnosis and management of the more serious and deeper penetrations, i.e. those involving the distal interphalangeal joint, the navicular bursa, the digital flexor tendon sheath and also (rarely) the proximal interphalangeal joint.  We will focus on what to do and when to refer the case, along with discussion of what treatment is likely to occur in the referral hospital setting, including surgery and ancillary antibiotic delivery techniques.  The presentation will be illustrated with real clinical cases. Finally the session will reflect on the outcomes of such cases, both for survival and for future athletic performance.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Thinking outside the pouch – Medicine of marsupials
Marsupials are commonly presented as sick, injured and orphaned wildlife. They are held in pretty much all zoos and wildlife parks in Australia for display and conservation breeding programs, are maintained by some research institutions, and in some jurisdictions are kept as pets. Veterinary care of marsupials has many similarities to domestic animals and exotic pets. However, there are notable differences in anatomy, physiology, diet, and biology that influence the common disease presentations, the approach to treatment, and requirements for hospitalisation and supportive care. This presentation will discuss the approach to the marsupial patient, the diagnosis and management of common diseases, preventative medicine, and general considerations of providing veterinary care to marsupials, with emphasis on macropods, possums, koalas and wombats. Specific topics will include restraint and anaesthesia, sample collection, drug therapy, capture myopathy and dental disease in macropods, gastrointestinal and skin disease in possums, infectious diseases and trauma of koalas, dental disease and sarcoptic mange in wombats, management of burned marsupials, and common problems of orphaned joeys

Speakers
avatar for Dr David McLelland

Dr David McLelland

Veterinarian, Zoos South Australia
David McLelland received his BVSc from Sydney University in 2001, and did a BSc(Vet) in 2000 investigating an encephalomyocarditis vaccine in animals at Taronga Zoo. After two years in practice in Darwin he moved to Canada to undertake a DVSc residency in Zoo Medicine and Pathology... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Dental radiography - why good medicine makes good business sense
There are no more excuses for not having dental radiography in your practice. If you are not taking dental radiographs you are missing disease and not treating your patients adequately. In addition to diagnosis, dental radiography also helps with clinical decision making and assists with extraction planning. These both help to make dental procedures go more smoothly and end up reducing stress in your vets. Dental radiography becomes the cornerstone to improve awareness and confidence in your staff that you are providing value to your clients and patients and helps to grow your dental program. You can also consider adding more services to your practice that can help your practice grow. Seeing the miraculous results in your patients because you treated all the disease that was present is reward enough to convince you that dental radiography is essential and equipment will quickly pay for itself if used properly

Speakers
AH

Amanda Hulands-Nave

Director, Bellarine Veterinary Practice
Amanda Hulands-Nave BVSc(Hons) MVSt MACVSc (SA Med) MANZCVS (SA Dent) Amanda graduated from the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999 and from Murdoch University with a Masters of Veterinary Studies in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery in 2005. Amanda... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Phase III Rehab principles - Exercises to obtain peak recovery and performance
As patients become more willing to use the limb and enter the late phase of rehabilitation, exercises to regain peak performance and activity are necessary. This presentation will focus on bringing the patient back to winning form.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Expected work conditions - You want me to do what?
A mismatch of expectations to the reality of professional life can be a cause of stress. Current entrants into the veterinary profession do so in a climate of rising student debt, lengthened veterinary programs, possible oversupply of graduates for some sectors and feminisation of the veterinary profession. Veterinary students’ expectations of work after graduation are important for a number of reasons including the weighing of work-life balance against remuneration level, work satisfaction and making career path or exit choices.   We report on work expectations of veterinary students of five Australian veterinary programs between the years 2011 to 2014. The relationship of gender and other influences on expectations for work after graduation will be described. Data will be presented as to where the veterinary students expect to work, the hours and ‘on call’ requirements expected, length of time expected in their first position and why they would move, and their knowledge of veterinary remuneration levels

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Senior Lecturer in Business & Practice Management, The University of Adelaide
I started in emergency practice and continued for 24 years as a rural practice owner. My teaching and research interests are business and entrepreneurial capabilities for veterinary science students and also PNG women in agriculture.


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Preventative behavioural medicine in dogs and cats PART 1
Strategies to prevent behavioural problems in dogs and cats can be conveniently divided into two categories: those that refer to early development of the puppy or kitten, and those that can be implemented at any age. Early development of dogs and cats includes four phases: pre-natal, neonatal, transition, socialisation and juvenile. Research done in a variety of species has shown that animals born to mothers that have suffered stress during pregnancy are likely to be more easily stressed as adults. Therefore, providing a non-stressful environment for the dam is important. Adequate tactile stimulation during the neonatal period results in animals being more able to adjust the intensity of their stress response to the relevance of the stressor. The importance of the socialization period cannot be overemphasized and dogs and cats should be exposed during this period to conspecifics, adult humans, infants and any stimuli that they are likely to encounter later on in life. Weaning age has a long-lasting effect on behaviour and research has shown that early weaning may result in lower tolerance to frustration. Environmental influences early in life interact with the genetic make-up of the individual and this will also be dealt with in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Use of animal based measures for assessing farm-animal welfare
The first reports published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) tried to identify environment and management indicators of poor welfare, because this approach corresponded to a quick and easy assessment. Consequently most European legislation on farm animal welfare was supported on these resource-based indicators. However, good management and access to an adequate environment do not necessarily result in a high standard of welfare. More recently the advantages of measuring welfare through animal-based indicators – the way in which the animal itself responds and copes with its surroundings – have become evident. In this paper we will review the process of testing animal-based indicators for validity (Does it measure what we think it measures? Does it relate to the animals experience?), reliability (Would it be recorded in the same way by more than one assessor? Would the same assessor record it in the same way on more than one occasion?) and feasibility (Can it be measured on farm in a reasonable manner?)

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

The acute phase reaction and trace mineral nutrition of beef calves
In beef cattle, there are a number of common management practices that result in stress, such as weaning, castration, vaccination, transportation, and commingling.  Despite the source of stress, these activities lead to the activation of the inflammatory reaction, which is initiated by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (namely interleukin -1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor – alpha).  These proteins are the initial instigators of the acute phase reaction, which orchestrates the subsequent production of acute phase proteins and ultimately metabolism alterations impacting feed intake, nutrient utilization, and growth.  Major acute phase proteins in the bovine include haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin, both of which are commonly measured indicators of inflammation. Recent research has revealed links between trace mineral status and impacts on the acute phase protein response of beef calves. These effects appear to have short-term impacts on beef calf productivity, suggesting a direct correlation between trace mineral nutrition and the nutrient-costs related to optimal immune responsiveness.  This presentation focuses on the role of trace mineral nutrition on the acute phase protein reaction and subsequent impacts on performance among newly weaned beef calves.

Speakers
DJ

Dr John Arthington

Professor John Arthington is a graduate of the Animal Sciences Departments of Purdue and Kansas State Universities and has been a member of the University of Florida, Animal Sciences faculty since 1998.  Currently, he serves as Professor and Director of the University of Florida... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

BVDV serological patterns in endemic herds during and after vaccination
Much has been published surrounding the impact of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea virus (BVDV) on reproduction and fertility, but there is a paucity of information, under Australian conditions, which describes the effect of exposure to BVDV on production. The impact of BVDV on liveweight gains in weaner calves, and whether vaccination with Pestigard™ (Zoetis Australia) would mitigate against any impact, was assessed in two BVDV endemically infected herds during 2015. This paper describes the serological patterns for BVDV antibody observed in the two herds before, during, and after vaccination, over the nine month duration of the trial. Observations are reported relating to the stability of antibody status within both the vaccinated and control groups, particularly surrounding contact with persistently-infected animals. Implications for herd immunity, and protection status are discussed in view of the reported variations, and some explanations are offered as to how these anomalies may occur. Planning effective control strategies against BVDV, including the use of vaccination, is reviewed in light of the data from these two investigations

Speakers
MA

Mr Alistair Smith

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678
Alistair qualified from the Royal Dick School of Veterinary Studies in Edinburgh (too many years ago to worry about!), and gained a Diploma in Bovine Reproduction from Liverpool University in 1994; he is also a Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Recognised Specialist in Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Management of head and trunk wounds in horses
The aim of this presentation is to present a wide range of Equine wounds of the head and trunk, in order to describe some different wound management techniques and some of the intricacies of working in these areas in the large animal.  Whilst less common than limb lacerations and wounds, injuries of the head and trunk in horses pose a significant part of the Equine clinician’s caseload.  The types of head injuries that will be discussed range from fractures of the maxilla and mandible, along with those involving the tooth roots, paranasal sinuses, the poll and the calvarium. The management of such cases obviously needs to be multidisciplined, due to the varied anatomical structures that are involved with the wounds, along with the high energy associated with many of these traumas.  Trunk wounds described in this talk will range from small (but often deep) penetrations that can involve both the thoracic and abdominal cavities.  There will also be graphic examples of extensive lacerations involving almost the entire body and unhappily, mutilations associated with sadism.  Burn injuries associated with barn and bushfires will not be discussed, as they are beyond the scope of this presentation.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Unusual pet surgical selection
General practitioners are often unsure how to proceed when presented with a small mammal or reptile surgical case. A range of small mammal and reptile surgical cases will be presented to compare and contrast the surgical management of these species with more familiar species seen in practice. Be entertained and go home with practical surgical tips for unusual pets.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Carmel

Brendan Carmel

UPAV Rep, FASAVA Committee, Warranwood Veterinary Centre
Dr Carmel works in a small animal practice in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne where over 90% of the caseload are unusual pets. He is the co-founder and current president of the Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians special interest group of the AVA; the President of the Unusual... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Extractions - keeping out of trouble!
Dental extractions are a daunting prospect for many. They are the number one reason Veterinarians ignore dental complaints in their patients. If you are worried by the possibility of extractions, your patients will suffer. Extractions are a legitimate and often required treatment for our Veterinary patients. From “simple” non-surgical approaches to the much more involved surgical removal of large teeth, your dental treatments should not be a concerning part of your day. Learn the skills that will enable you to take control of these situations and make dental extractions easy

Speakers
AF

Aaron Forsayeth

Advanced Animal Dentistry
Aaron started his veterinary career in mixed practice at the Roma Veterinary Clinic in 1997. Here he was exposed to a wide range of things, not least of which dental procedures. Having received minimal formal training in any dentistry whilst at university, these initial experiences... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Clinical diagnosis of cruciate disease: What are we missing?
Cruciate disease has been described as the “Achilles heel” of dogs. The lameness and osteoarthritis that result are the most common orthopaedic presentation in small animal practice. Cruciate disease is also the most commonly operated orthopaedic problem in dogs. Despite this many cases of cruciate disease are not diagnosed or managed effectively despite repeat presentations of the animal by the owner. Why is this? Traditionally we have been taught that diagnosing cruciate disease requires demonstration of stifle joint instability. Through a better understanding of disease progression we now know that cruciate instability is the end-stage of a slowly progressive disease. We also know that by waiting until the joint is unstable before operating we increase the risk of secondary meniscal injury and more severe osteoarthritis by 160 fold. This session will use video case studies to focus in a very practical way on the key points that simplify early clinical diagnosis of cruciate disease. The importance of radiographs in the diagnosis and treatment decision-making in cruciate disease will be highlighted through case studies.

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →



Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

EMS Workshop and Panel: Costs and benefits of student placement
Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Preventative behavioural medicine in dogs and cats PART 2
As many behavioural problems are caused by stress, management strategies aimed at reducing stress have a positive effect on the behaviour of dogs and cats. The stress response is triggered when animals are unable to predict and control their environment. Setting consistent rules, so that the expectations of the animals are met, increases the predictability of their environment. Several studies have shown that environmental enrichment reduces stress. In practice, environmental enrichment should allow animals to express their natural behaviour and provide them with a safe area. Affiliative relationships with other animals and with humans also reduce the stress response. Some behavioural problems are caused by pain and therefore early identification and treatment of pain will also contribute to preventing behavioural problems. It has been suggested that neutering reduces the likelihood of some behavioural problems, in particular those that are sexually dimorphic, such as inter-male aggression, urine marking and roaming. However, some recent evidence seem to indicate that neutering may increase the risk of other behaviour problems, such as noise fear. The effects of neutering on behaviour will be discussed in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Welfare quality and AWIN welfare assessment protocols for ruminants
Welfare assessment requires a multidimensional approach corresponding to a multi-criteria evaluation. To develop a practical tool that delivers an overall view of welfare, different specific indicators need to be integrated into an assessment protocol. In 2009 the Welfare Quality project re-elaborated the concept of the traditional “Five Freedoms” and defined four main areas of concern (“Welfare Principles”) – Good feeding; Good housing; Good health; Appropriate behaviour expression – which were then split into twelve criteria each of which corresponded to a key welfare dimension. Criteria should be independent of each other and form an exhaustive, but minimal list. Two large European projects have recently studied and integrated welfare indicators to produce assessment protocols for most production animal species. The Welfare Quality (2009) project addressed both dairy and beef cattle and the AWIN project produced protocols for sheep and goats (2015). In this paper we will present the different protocols and discuss the applicability and constrains encountered when applying them

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Effect of pestivirus on the performance of weaner cattle
Much has been published surrounding the impact of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea virus (BVDV) on reproduction and fertility, but there is a paucity of information, under Australian conditions, which describes the effect of exposure to BVDV on production. The impact of BVDV on liveweight gains in weaner calves, and whether vaccination with Pestigard™ (Zoetis Australia) would mitigate against any impact, was assessed in two BVDV endemically infected herds during 2015. This paper assesses the effect of exposure to pestivirus in either vaccinated or unvaccinated weaner cattle over a nine month period. In one herd, 400 weaners (200 heifers and 200 steers) were weighed on 7 different occasions, while in the 2nd herd 120 heifers were weighed at the beginning and the end of the trial. Comparisons are made between vaccinated and control animals, and by serological status, to more accurately assess any impacts of exposure to pestivirus. Exposure to pestivirus generally had little impact on the growth rate of weaner cattle, contrary to many previous assertions. The implications of the findings are discussed in relation to on-farm control.

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Allworth

Bruce Allworth

Allworth Sheep and Cattle Production
Worked at Massey University and Melbourne University (Mackinnon Project). Operated Allworth Sheep and Cattle Consultancy Services for 25 years. Completed a pHD in footrot eradication, and coordinated the National Johnes Disease Program from 1997-2003. Operates sheep and cattle property... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 15:00 - 15:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:30

Afternoon tea
Monday May 23, 2016 15:30 - 16:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

The history of Torrens island quarantine 1850s to the present
From the earliest days Torrens Island was recognised as an ideal location for human and animal quarantine. Obviously close to the sea, isolated but a part of Adelaide, and in later years near to an international airport. The early history involved imports of dogs, cattle and pigs. During the 1920s the station also undertook the breeding of rabbits for hospitals. However it was only in the 1980s that more complex quarantines occurred. The scrapie accreditation program involved a 6-year program. Imported Angora goats and sheep were bred on the island to produce progeny that could then be released. At its peak 1300 hundred goats and sheep were run under intensive field conditions. Disease was a major problem. Major problems occurred with Cosccidia, Corynebacterium infection, sugar gum poisoning, fatty liver and spider syndrome. In 1986 Adelaide hosted the Sixth World Three Day Eventing championships. Streamlining Quarantine arrangements for this event was a forerunner for the Sydney Olympics. Until recently Torrens was the site for the first legal imports of fertile eggs. Its beginnings caused considerable controversy within the commercial industry. The presentation will also briefly touch on human quarantine events including its use as an internment camp during World War 1.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Chris Bunn

Dr Chris Bunn

Dr Chris Bunn graduated from Melbourne in 1967. His working life involved both State and Federal government positions. In 1985 he became the last veterinary officer to be employed at Torrens Island, to manage the Scrapie accreditation program for the next six years. The station also... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 16:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Western vs. Eastern concepts in equine pain management
We have not yet found a drug or technique that is 100% effective for treating and preventing pain in horses. Western medicine is incredibly important and useful when dealing with pain in horses. Unfortunately, the positive effect of every drug comes with the negative side effects. In some patients, the side effects cannot be tolerated. Eastern medicine techniques are an alternative option for those patients. Acupuncture, massage and herbal medicine can be offered in combination or alone depending on the patient and disease process. In addition to explaining the techniques and options available, current associated research and literature will be included in the discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Lumps and bumps in legged reptiles
An overview of the clinical signs, diagnosis, causes and treatment of the assorted types of mass lesions that can affect lizards, turtles and crocodiles. Real cases examples will be used to highlight and demonstrate what's involved in treating these amazing animals and the myriad of lumps and bumps that they can develop

Speakers
avatar for Shane Simpson

Shane Simpson

Director, Karingal Veterinary Hospital
Dr Shane Simpson is a partner at Karingal Veterinary Hospital located south-east of Melbourne. He has a special interest in reptile and amphibian medicine and surgery with the majority of his clinical work now involving these fascinating animals. He regularly presents on this subject... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Radiology of benign versus aggressive bone and joint disease
While extremes of benign and aggressive disease of musculoskeletal structures are reasonably apparent to most clinicians, the spectrum of radiographic features can be quite broad and significant overlap is frequently present, making interpretation difficult. Temporal features of the disease process can have a significant influence upon the physical properties of the affected anatomical structures and hence the radiographic signs that the clinician may identify on first examination. Further confusion can arise when more acute disease is superimposed upon pre-existing conditions, such as osteoarthrosis or anomalous variants in development. Radiographic interpretation is not a histological diagnosis, but careful examination for key features combined with the clinical context (history, signalment and other pertinent information) can provide the veterinarian with greater conviction regarding the underlying aetiology of lesions, and hence a prioritised approach to further diagnostic and/or therapeutic interventions. Using case examples and correlative alternative imaging modalities, the features of osteomyelitis, septic and immune-mediated arthritis, osteoarthrosis, and neoplasia of bones and joints will be reviewed, along with the indications for further diagnostic tests

Speakers
DR

Dr Robert Nicoll

Prior to specialising in diagnostic imaging, Robert worked in mixed veterinary practice for several years in Bathurst, NSW. After undertaking his residency training at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, he returned to Australia and with Graeme Allan, Robert formed Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Communications to help your team achieve practice goals
Effective internal communication is essential for practices to operate smoothly and attain hospital goals. Attendees will learn how to use written tools to help set expectations for team performance, how to “manage up”, facilitate more effective team meetings and practical tips on developing a goal-oriented team

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats in South Australia- science, policy and public opinion.
Compulsory desexing of dogs and cats will soon be regulated in South Australia. The aim of this talk will be to provide some background into the policy leading to the legislative change. In dogs, the aim is to reduce the number of dog attacks in the community, while in cats better population management may lead to reduced numbers of cats taken to shelters. The changes in South Australia are an interesting case study of the intersection of scientific evidence, policy and public opinion. Public opinion had a large part to play, with a Citizen Jury making the final recommendation to the Minister. However, the decision is not without controversy, and some of the more hotly debated implications will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Susan Hazel

Susan Hazel

Senior Lecturer, University of Adelaide
Susan Hazel is a veterinary graduate from the University of Sydney. She is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide and teaches in animal behaviour, welfare and ethics. Susan is a Member of 2 South Australian Animal Ethics Committees... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Animal welfare and profitable farming
Increasingly, consumers expect animal welfare to be part of the core of farm animal production and will avoid products which they view as not fulfilling minimum conditions. Examples of this pressure and of consumers withdrawing their support for certain types of production are available worldwide. So, farming counter to public concern is nowadays unsustainable. However, assessing and ratifying welfare has shown to be not only essential in these certification schemes for consumers and in legislation enforcement, but also a useful tool in clinical, management and economical decision making. Measurement is a fundamental component of management and supervision. It is obvious that animals with poor welfare have suboptimal performances or demand artificial ways of maintaining health and production (e.g. antimicrobials). By assessing welfare through a well built and comprehensive protocol, it is possible to early identify sub-clinical disease, health risk factors and reasons for low yield, reduced growth or high mortality. It is also an excellent way to discern and monitor disease prevalence, such as lameness. In this paper we will present examples of good welfare as a way to guarantee animal health and farm profit

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Evaluation of practices used to reduce the incidence of bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlots
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD)is a complex multifactorial disease that occurs commonly in feedlot cattle but is also increasingly being identified as a significant cause of losses in the rearing of dairy calves and in intensive beef grazing systems. Many BRD preventative practices have become commonplace in the absence of adequate supporting data. We will identify those practices for which there is substantial support to assist you in the design of BRD preventative programmes for your clients

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30

Gender and university differences in career sector and business intent of Australian veterinary students
We report on career sector and business intentions of veterinary students of five Australian veterinary programs between the years 2011 to 2014. The presentation will also describe differences to these intentions for gender and university. Data will be presented for student interest in pursuing government work, biosecurity or diagnostic laboratories, biomedical research and academia, not working as a veterinarian, intensive animal production, practice with large animals, companion animal practice and business ownership.

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Senior Lecturer in Business & Practice Management, The University of Adelaide
I started in emergency practice and continued for 24 years as a rural practice owner. My teaching and research interests are business and entrepreneurial capabilities for veterinary science students and also PNG women in agriculture.


Monday May 23, 2016 16:30 - 17:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Theileria molecular diagnostics, chemotherapy, epidemiology and immunology
After what had been considered the benign presence of the organism in Queensland cattle for more than a century, Bovine anaemia caused by the Theileria orientalis group became an emerging disease of cattle in north-east NSW, with a sharp increase in the number of clinical outbreaks from 2007 onwards. A group of stakeholders met in September 2009 to agree on a national case definition for the condition and extension of available knowledge, to prioritise research directions and projects, and to develop a national education and communication plan. The agreed broad areas of research were: the aetiology and transmission of the disease; the prevalence of the disease, the organism and its vector(s); diagnostics, therapy and economic impact. In the ensuing 6 years, Meat and Livestock Australia funded a suite of research projects into the condition. Molecular diagnostics enabled the discovery that more than one type of T orientalis were present and that the Ikeda type was consistently implicated in cases of clinical disease and was probably a relatively new arrival to the country. Buparvaquone was chosen as a candidate chemotherapeutic and residue assay and depletion data generated. Further research confirmed that Haemaphysalis longicornis was a biological vector of the infection in Australia, but that mechanical transmission by various means could not be ruled out

Speakers
JS

Johann Schroder

Johann Schröder After qualifying as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in South Africa and a short stint in mixed private practice, Dr Schröder joined the multi-national pharmaceutical industry and specialised in veterinary parasitology, in which he holds a Master’s degree. His industry... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Incorporating traditional eastern medicine into sport horse practice
Equine sports medicine has evolved in response to the needs of our equine athletes. The competition calendar is now year round for many equine athletes and the veterinarian is expected to maintain peak athletic performance in these animals while minimizing or avoiding pharmaceuticals. Eastern medicine techniques combine easily with an athlete’s maintenance program.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

GnRH agonist use in unusual and avian pets
GnRH agonists suppress sex hormones and have traditionally been used to treat hormone-related diseases. Diseases such as ovarian cysts in guinea pigs and adrenal disease in ferrets have traditionally been treated surgically, but the advent of longer-acting GnRH agonists such as leuprolide injections and deslorelin implants have allowed them to be managed medically when appropriate. More recently, GnRH agonists have also been used to manage hormone-related behavioural problems such as aggression, hypersexuality and feather-plucking in species that are difficult to routinely desex, eg. birds and reptiles. The mechanism of action, duration of action and appropriateness of GnRH agonists for these different diseases and species will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Shangzhe Xie

Dr Shangzhe Xie

Exotic Pets Referral Veterinarian/Surgical Coordinating Veterinarian, Adelaide Veterinary Specialist and Referral Centre
Dr Shangzhe Xie has been working as a veterinarian within exotics referral practices since his graduation from Murdoch University in 2008. Shangzhe also completed a Masters of Veterinary Studies in Conservation Medicine degree from 2009-2010. After completing the Masters degree, Shangzhe... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

History SIG Annual Meeting
Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Technical and clinical reasons for radiographs to hide lesions
Radiographic interpretation combines an understanding of normal radiographic anatomy with the pathophysiology of disease and how this will influence image formation. For this reason, disorders and diseases of animals fall into one of two categories – those that are radiographically detectable and those that are not. In order to be detected, the clinician must be able to appreciate a change in radiographic features from that which would normally be expected. Technical issues can affect image quality such that abnormalities can be impossible to detect, missed or overlooked. Those diseases that do not alter physiology and anatomy sufficiently to alter the radiographic image cannot be detected. Other complications in radiographic interpretation occur when different diseases create the same change in radiographic features as one another, despite their differing aetiology (and hence differing prognosis and therapeutic options). For all these reasons it is imperative for the radiographic evaluation to be complete and of a sufficiently high standard to be deemed a diagnostic series. A key to interpretation is to have a generic approach in the identification of abnormalities as specific radiographic signs so that multiple aetiologies of lesions can be considered. The clinician reviewing the examination can be aided by an understanding of how certain disorders would be expected to manifest but should aim to be open minded during interpretation so that multiple lesions or differential diagnoses are not overlooked. Case studies will be used to illustrate common radiographic technical and interpretation pitfalls and how to avoid them

Speakers
DR

Dr Robert Nicoll

Prior to specialising in diagnostic imaging, Robert worked in mixed veterinary practice for several years in Bathurst, NSW. After undertaking his residency training at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, he returned to Australia and with Graeme Allan, Robert formed Veterinary... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Action steps to improve accountability
Does your practice have problems with inconsistent job performance for some employees? Come learn how to improve communications during orientation, introductory periods and employee discipline meetings. Attendees will leave knowing how to manage by core values and how to make accountability part of the practice culture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Ag-gag laws for Australia? Implications for livestock industries and the public's right to know
Ag-gag legislation can be broadly described as any law or legal instrument, which in form or operation, has the effect of impeding public and political communication about agricultural practices, particularly relating to the treatment of animals. Such laws have been vigorously pursued in the United States as a means of addressing the increased use of private surveillance devices to expose cases of farm animal cruelty. Some legislators in Australia are now pursuing a similar legislative agenda. This presentation will review the nature of ag-gag laws, the debate in the US, and the proposals for Australia. The potential long-term implications for livestock industries will be considered and alternative strategies to achieve the same ends will be proposed.

Speakers
JG

Jed Goodfellow

Dr Jed Goodfellow is the Senior Policy Officer at RSPCA Australia and a Lecturer in Animal Law at Macquarie University. He recently completed his PhD thesis examining the animal welfare regulatory framework within the Australian agricultural sector. Prior to undertaking his postgraduate... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Genotypic and phenotypic resistance and resilience of sheep to gastro-intestinal parasitism
Selection for genetic resistance and resilience to gastro-intestinal worms is established practice in the Australian sheep industry. Genetic resistance is mediated by host immune response which has been shown to be a significant contributor to reduced growth rate in scourworm infections in sheep. Several questions of practical importance arise:  Can  selection for resistance inadvertently reduce productivity of meat sheep ?: Are there differences in the cost of the immune response between lambs that differ in their potential to limit worm infection (resistance)?: If so, is the cost influenced by co-selection for increased growth rate in the presence of infection (resilience)?  There are two mechanisms to address these questions, namely review of industry genetic and productivity data, and structured experimentation in known genetic lines of sheep. This presentation draws the available information together, defines undisputable knowledge, attempts to identify questionable assumptions, and assembles thoughts on what we need to know to underpin ongoing efficient selection for resistance and resilience to worm infections in sheep.

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Carmichael

Dr Ian Carmichael graduated in Veterinary Science from Melbourne University in 1967 and was awarded a DVSc from the University of Pretoria, South Africa in 1990. He worked in Africa and Asia for two decades as a specialist research scientist in government and corporate educational... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30

Economic impact of endemic livestock diseases
Producer-funded animal health R&D in Australia is prioritised in part based on the estimated cost of the most important diseases. A survey of cattle and sheep diseases conducted in 2006 had served as a valuable tool for this purpose, but needed updating. A follow-up survey in 2014 estimated the cost of a number of endemic diseases considered to be economically damaging to the red meat industry (cattle, sheep and goats). The survey included producers, processors, government and industry representatives, as well as perusal of available literature. Assumptions of disease distribution, prevalence, production losses and costs of prevention and treatment were analysed in a spreadsheet-based model which estimated individual animal, herd/flock and national costs of each important disease. The 17 diseases of cattle, 23 of sheep and 8 of goats were further assessed in terms of knowledge gaps regarding their aetiology, prevention and treatment, and the threat each one posed in terms of geographic distribution and prevalence

Speakers
JS

Johann Schroder

Johann Schröder After qualifying as a veterinarian at Onderstepoort in South Africa and a short stint in mixed private practice, Dr Schröder joined the multi-national pharmaceutical industry and specialised in veterinary parasitology, in which he holds a Master’s degree. His industry... Read More →


Monday May 23, 2016 17:30 - 18:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

18:00

Happy Hour
Monday May 23, 2016 18:00 - 19:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

19:00

The University of Queensland Veterinary alumni cocktail reception
Stamford Plaza 150 North Terrace, Adelaide

Please join the Dean, Professor Glen Coleman, and colleagues on the occasion of the 80th anniversary of UQ Veterinary Science.

Cost: $15

Monday May 23, 2016 19:00 - 20:30
Social Events

19:00

The University of Melbourne Veterinary alumni cocktail reception
Blake’s Room, Intercontinental Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide

Hosted by the Faculty of Veterinary & Agricultural Sciences

Cost: $15

Monday May 23, 2016 19:00 - 21:00
Social Events

19:30

The University of Sydney Veterinary alumni cocktail reception
Ballroom 2 The Sebel Playford 120 North Terrace Adelaide

Hosted by the Dean, Professor Rosanne Taylor and the Veterinary Alumni Association.

Function will include a brief (10 minute) AGM of the USyd Veterinary Alumni

Cost: $10.00. Limited spaces

Monday May 23, 2016 19:30 - 21:00
Social Events

19:30

Equine Veterinarians Australia (EVA) ‘Equine and Dine
Union Hotel – “Upstairs at Bar Cuba”
70 Waymouth Street, Adelaide

Catch up with your colleagues and friends from all areas of the profession with an interest in equine. A relaxed evening of drinks and substantial finger food. Please note that this is not a sit-down dinner.

SIG Member and Member’s Guest: $49
AVA member: $69
AVA student or new graduate member: $35
Non-member: $138

Monday May 23, 2016 19:30 - 21:30
Social Events

19:30

Australian Cattle Veterinarians (ACV) 'Chewing the Cud'
Join others with a bovine interest to chew the cud & ruminate on the latest in rural practice on Monday evening following happy hour. Buffet and cash bar

SIG member/partner/guest: $45
AVA member $55
AVA student or new graduate member:$45
Non-member: $110

Monday May 23, 2016 19:30 - 22:30
Social Events
 
Tuesday, May 24
 

06:45

06:45

08:00

Flipped classroom use in veterinary education
This presentation is based on a multi-national study (Australia, USA, UK) investigating educators’ use and perceptions of the flipped classroom method to teach veterinary students. This teaching approach involves students working independently prior to class to grasp basic concepts using videos, texts and online resources, then participating in active, applied learning and problem solving exercises in class (King 1993, Lage, Platt and Treglia 2000; McDonald and Smith 2013). Use of this method is likely to be increasingly expected by both education providers and students as healthcare education methods shift towards greater use of online technologies and student-centred learning approaches (Prober and Khan 2013). This investigation provides insight into current techniques for flipped classroom teaching in veterinary education, together with educators’ perceptions of the opportunities, benefits and barriers to its implementation. The results generate baseline data for future comparison as the use of this method evolves in veterinary education, and are of immediate practical use to educators and institutions seeking to implement innovative teaching approaches in their curricula.

Speakers
SM

Susan Matthew

Associate Professor Susan Matthew is the Associate Chair of Veterinary Medical Education at Washington State University in the USA. Susan has a PhD in veterinary education and works collaboratively to lead international research and development of veterinary curricula, professional... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 08:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Emergency management and transportation of the equine fracture patient
Equine fractures occur commonly enough in practice that there is an absolute requirement for the clinician to be aware of the appropriate first aid, splinting and transportation techniques available.  Furthermore they are often stressful situations for all, including the patient, owner/trainer and the practitioner!  Veterinarians are often being rushed into decision making in such circumstances, be it in the field or on the racecourse, which adds to the pressure of the situation.  In this presentation we firstly discuss how to make the diagnosis in the field and then specifically look at bandaging and splinting techniques of the various anatomical regions of the horses limbs.  Forelimb fractures are generally divided into four anatomical zones and hind limbs are divided into three zones, each of which has specific bandage/splint combination requirements that one must be aware of.  We will also look at some of the commercially available splints along with those made from commonly available resources and prepared in the field.  This is an important presentation, not only because of its welfare issue, but also because appropriate splinting and transportation of the fracture patient can prevent further trauma, improving the chance of a successful repair at a referral facility.

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Less frequent indicators of poor health and welfare in ruminants
While studying animal-based measures to be included in the welfare assessment protocols, researchers often identify potential welfare indicators that do not fulfil the standards. This could be due to low prevalence, ambiguous meaning, lack of inter-observer repeatability, or unknown or controversial validity. For example, stereotypies (repetitive, topographically invariant response sequences that appear to lack any ultimate or proximal function) are often detected in intensively kept ruminants but the welfare significance of these is not clear. The most frequent examples of oral stereotypic behaviour in ruminants are “tongue-playing” observed mostly in heifers and cows, and biting at fences, walls or troughs, which are common in sheep, goats and calves. Another example to be presented is cross and inter-sucking that is relatively common in some dairy farms and has profound implications in udder health. Other examples in small ruminants’ farms are certain agonistic behaviours, isolation from the herd, obliviousness etc… Additionally Qualitive Behaviour Assessment (QBA) will be discussed as a potential positive welfare indicator

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Common fractures of the hindlimb
This session will use case studies to focus on the tips, tricks and decision-making to achieve consistent success in resolving hindlimb fractures in dogs and cats that present commonly in small animal practice. Distal femoral physeal fractures occur commonly in immature dogs and cats. This is the most common type of Salter-Harris fracture that presents in small animal practice. How to simplify fracture reduction and pin placement will be covered. Acetabular fractures are a common occurrence following major pelvic trauma and require the attending veterinarian to decide between fracture repair, conservative management and excision arthroplasty or other salvage procedure. Simple guidelines for deciding on how to manage these fractures will be covered. The tibia is one of the most commonly fractured bones in dogs and is the only long bone where every one of the fracture repair options can be used. Options for treatment, particularly of comminuted fractures, will be covered through case studies

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →



Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Three keys to greater employee motivation
Knowing how to motivate and train all your team members is a challenge. Focusing on the talents and strengths of your employees rather than their weaknesses will help you take your team to the next level of job performance. Attendees of this session will walk away knowing how to identify employee motivators, how to improve employee engagement and how to implement effective employee developmental plans

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Welfare of dairy cattle: from basic principles to practical applications
Dairy cattle welfare can be assessed using several protocols, one of them being the Welfare Quality® protocol, which includes four principles of good welfare: good feeding, good housing, good health and appropriate behaviour. Each principle is divided into several criteria and each criteria is assessed through several indicators, many of them animal-based. Some of the main problems related to feeding are poor body condition and inadequate access to water. Comfort at resting is one of the main housing issues, as dairy cows should lie down for a prolonged period of time every day. Painful conditions such as lameness and mastitis are important welfare problems under the principle of good health, whereas fear of humans due to poor stockmanship is one of the main issues under the principle of appropriate behaviour. Some of the indicators that are included in the Welfare Quality® protocol will be covered in the lecture. Additionally, some welfare issues and indicators that are not part of the Welfare Quality® protocol, such as heat stress will be covered. The relationship between welfare and performance will also be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Triage, treat and then what? Bushfire, wildlife and SAVEM.
Bushfires are increasing in Australia and worsening globally within temporal and geographic parameters: the corollary of climate change and increasing severe weather events. Bushfire is news when people, property, infrastructure and animals find themselves in its path. Superimpose on this a shrinking “off” season, the demands of year-round bushfire preparedness, and the migration of wildlife into idyllic human populated habitat. Combine that with 43 degrees and strong northerly winds: the quintessential Australian summer. South Australian Veterinary Emergency Management (SAVEM Inc) was formed in 2009 after the Victorian Black Saturday bushfires devastated that State in just such a scenario. Since then we have responded to bushfires every year, the largest being the Sampson Flat fire in January 2015, and the Pinery fire of November the same year. SAVEM works with all species of animals, and wildlife pose particular challenges. Veterinarians are in a privileged and unique professional position to join the ranks of Emergency responders – bringing clinical, problem solving and counseling skills. But a fireground is a very long way from “business as usual”, and without Emergency Management training a fireground can be a fatal place even after the fire is contained or controlled. This presentation by the SAVEM Coordinator will describe the principles and processes of effective practical Emergency Management as it pertains to operational case studies of recent South Australian fires. It will highlight confronting issues and difficult questions regarding management of wildlife involved in those fires; some lessons learned and why veterinary science has an important place at the table in effectively extending knowledge of natural hazard impacts and consequences

Speakers
avatar for Dr Rachel Westcott

Dr Rachel Westcott

Coordinator, SAVEM Inc.
Dr Rachel Westcott is a veterinarian in her own private practice in Adelaide’s south. She graduated from Murdoch University in 1999 with first class honours, and is now a PhD candidate with Western Sydney University and the Bushfire & Natural Hazards CRC. In 2009, Rachel founded... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Rumen dynamics and ruminant physiology
We will build a schematic diagram of the rumen, and the production and utilisation of its fermentative end products. Our discussion will work through the clinical significance of ruminant physiology and biochemistry in the utilisation of the fermentative end products and the utilisation of nutrients that survive passage through the rumen. Biochemistry will be given meaning in a clinical context

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30

Mental practice: A tool for veterinary students to prepare for surgery
Surgical training is changing. In both human and veterinary spheres, surgery has traditionally been taught by the apprenticeship model, whereby students learn through repeated supervised practice. Advances in surgical technology, funding limitations and societal litigiousness, among other pressures, have made this ‘see one, do one, teach one’ approach difficult to implement. These pressures have led to the development of new tools to train the novice surgeon. One such emerging tool is mental practice. Mental practice is the use of visualisation to symbolically rehearse a physical task without external stimuli or executing the task itself. Mental practice enables surgery students to practice skills in a manner that requires minimal funding and physical resources. The application of mental practice in the field of human surgical training is growing and there is a potential for similar application in veterinary surgical training. Two studies were conducted comparing mental practice with textbook reading prior to performing surgery in veterinary students. The results of these studies identify that mental practice may be a useful technique for increasing confidence and promoting positive outcomes for surgical training in veterinary schools

Speakers
DC

Dr Charlotte Johnston

Charlotte Johnston graduated a Bachelor of Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Veterinary Science (Hons) at Charles Sturt University in 2015 and is currently based in Southern NSW as part of the Greencross Vets New Graduate program. Kellie Thomas is in her final year of a Bachelor of Bachelor... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 08:30 - 09:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Importance of professional capabilities to veterinary medicine students
Preparation of veterinary undergraduates for professional life is important for both the undergraduate and for the profession. Professional capabilities (those other than scientific understanding and clinical acumen) are acknowledged as important requirements to perform as a veterinarian. Educators are mandated by both universities and accrediting bodies to incorporate learning, teaching and assessment of such attributes in professional programs such as veterinary programs. However engagement in development of such attributes or attitudes by students during their university program is influenced by their motivation and their belief that they are important.   We report on findings from a study of veterinary students from five Australian veterinary programs over the years 2011 and 2014. Relationships of gender and other factors including age and year level (early, mid and late program) to veterinary student ranked importance of a range of professional capabilities will be described. The findings may be useful to veterinary educators for reflective practice on curriculum design and admissions policy 

Speakers
avatar for Adele Feakes

Adele Feakes

Senior Lecturer in Business & Practice Management, The University of Adelaide
I started in emergency practice and continued for 24 years as a rural practice owner. My teaching and research interests are business and entrepreneurial capabilities for veterinary science students and also PNG women in agriculture.


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 09:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Bandages and casts in equine practice
Bandages and casts are an integral part of Equine orthopaedic practice, and the techniques that are employed range from simple to complex.  Bandaging is a good ‘day one’ skill to master, as it often serves as a ‘beach head’ when embarking in your early years of practice.

This presentation focuses on a wide range of bandaging techniques used in horses, both of the appendicular(limbs) and axial(body) skeleton.  Techniques and materials are explained with reference to commonly and less commonly available materials in Australia.  In this talk we’ll confront some of the more difficult areas of the body to cover with practical ‘how to’ type instructions.

The casting component of the presentation will detail the classification of equine casts used, the indications for such casts and also the step-by-step application of casts.  Complications associated with cast application in the horse are not uncommon.  Whilst the most complication is the pressure rub, some of these can be so severe that the complication itself outweighs the purpose for which the cast is applied!  The presentation is highly illustrated and tips and tricks of improving the quality of your casts will be explained.  If you have little experience in bandage or cast application in horses or simply want to improve your results, this presentation should be of value.

 

Speakers
DT

Dr Todd Booth

Todd qualified from University of Queensland in 1989 and then worked in mixed species and equine practice in Australia before an internship in Equine surgery at Murdoch University in 1994. After 2 years travelling he took on a specialist equine surgery-training program and Masters... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

What is the role of the farm animal clinician?
The change in roles for most farm animal clinicians from treating individual sick animals to working at a herd / flock preventive level has been obvious and widely recognised. Farm animal clinicians may also have roles as educators, facilitators, counsellors, advocates, researchers or even enforcers. These potential complex roles generate a) ethical questions: whose interests are clinicians working towards? b) practical questions : how do we better communicate to achieve these goals? and c) financial questions : How can veterinary practices derive income from these new roles ? Given the information explosion, it seems impossible for vets to retain the reputation as the single authoritative source of animal health and welfare knowledge, perhaps clients primarily need support in synthesising and reviewing existing knowledge. Recent work has also highlighted the potential for valuing innovation and research undertaken by groups of farmers. In this context vets could have a role in supporting the production of practice-based evidence rather than simply disseminating evidence-based medicine

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Open fractures don't need ESFs or amputation!
Open fractures are complex slow healing fractures that have a greater risk of becoming a nonunion than a closed fracture. Many open fractures end with an amputation that in most cases was avoidable with correct management. Open fractures have been traditionally associated with external skeletal fixators (ESFs) - and complications!! Today with a better understanding of fracture biology and fracture repair methods it is apparent that in many cases the wrong decision for fracture repair is the use of an ESF. Using bone plates to repair open fractures used to be considered to be the second choice to ESFs whereas today plate repair is the most common used by most specialists. This session will use case studies to focus on the decision-making in open fracture treatment that will maximize success and minimize complications

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor Mark Glyde

Associate Professor, Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital
Mark Glyde BVSc MACVSc MVS HDipUTL DiplomateECVS Mark is Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery at Murdoch University and heads the busy orthopaedic and neurosurgery referral service. Mark was in small animal practice for 11 years and a practice partner for five years before... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

How to create a team of problem-solvers
Managers frequently deal with employee interruptions and find themselves setting out fires. In this session you’ll discover how empowered your team is and how to communicate more effectively so your team can take action to solve problems. You’ll learn how to handle employee interruptions, how to delegate effectively, and give feedback that results in improved team performance

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Social behaviour of dogs and cats: from basic principles to practical applications
Some of the main behavioural problems in dogs and cats, including aggression and separation anxiety, are related to social behaviour. Therefore, understanding the basic principles of social behaviour is essential to prevent and treat such problems. Social behaviour within a given species will vary depending on environmental features such as food abundance and distribution, for example. This is the case with free-living domestic cats, which may either form colonies or show a solitary, territorial social organization. There are several factors that explain why cats are more tolerant to conspecifics in certain conditions and understanding these factors is important to reduce the risk of inter-cat aggression. In the case of dogs, one aspect of their social behaviour that has received a great deal of attention is the importance, if any, of dominance and hierarchy. Research shows that the importance of dominance-based relationships in dogs has been overemphasized and the practical implications of current thinking on the importance of dominance relationships in dogs will be discussed in the lecture. Affiliative relationships and appropriate social attachment appear to be of paramount importance to reduce stress and the likelihood of dogs developing separation anxiety

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Veterinarians in aquaculture
VThe Aquaculture industry in Australia is a growing field, and the demand for seafood domestically and internationally is projected to rise in tonnage. The Australian aquaculture industry currently includes the production of oysters, mussels, prawns, barramundi, kingfish, silver perch (and other native fish), trout, salmon and Southern Bluefin tuna as commercial species. The aquaculture systems used to grow these species include recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS), flow-through, semi-flow through, sea-cage systems and ponds. These diverse systems require tailored health and biosecurity management strategies to suit the needs of each individual business/farm. To support growing levels of production, health management of stock is necessary to optimise performance and survival, which feeds into profitability of businesses. Health management is seen to be more holistic and encompasses not only disease control and prevention but also welfare management; and research and development. Veterinarians hold an essential future in this field, but support is needed for post-graduate training and continuing education. Attaining the right people in the field will support a culture of continuous improvement to strive for best-practice health management across the industry. Most importantly, an understanding the roles of other professionals in the field is necessary for collaboration and successful implementation of health and welfare systems

Speakers
DC

Dr Christine Huynh

After graduating from University of Sydney, Christine entered the Aquaculture field. Her passion for Aquatic Animal Health and Production medicine has been nurtured by being involved with Aquaculture. Christine spent 3.5 years working in private practice, consulting for aquaculture... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Impacts of injectable trace minerals on measures of humoral immunity in beef cattle
Trace minerals, namely copper, selenium, and zinc, have been known to impact immune competence in cattle.  Impacts are associated with innate immune defenses, such as the role of zinc on skin and mucosal barriers, the effects of selenium on phagocytic cell function, and the role of copper and zinc on humoral immune reactions.  Deficiency complications are often associated with calves reared in grazing systems because these essential elements are commonly deficient in grazed forages, particularly warm season forages.  To protect against deficiency, supplementation strategies are required.  In most all production environments, grazing cattle rely upon salt-based, free-choice supplements to supply adequate supplementation and protect against deficiency. This management approach is complicated by several factors among which are the impacts of trace mineral antagonists in grazed forage and the reliance upon predictable, uniform intake of free-choice mineral supplements.  Numerous options are available to assist in the management of trace mineral nutrition of grazing cattle.  This presentation will focus on recent research aimed at the effects of injectable trace minerals on measures of trace mineral status and humoral immune responses of weaned calves

Speakers
DJ

Dr John Arthington

Professor John Arthington is a graduate of the Animal Sciences Departments of Purdue and Kansas State Universities and has been a member of the University of Florida, Animal Sciences faculty since 1998.  Currently, he serves as Professor and Director of the University of Florida... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30

2016 Excellence in Teaching award - winner to be announced. Topic: Final year veterinary para-clinical training through composite blended learning
Using composite blended learning to motivate and inspire final year veterinary students to adopt population based para-clinical training in their professional


Tuesday May 24, 2016 09:30 - 10:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:00

Morning tea
Tuesday May 24, 2016 10:00 - 10:45
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

10:45

Address by 2016 Gilruth Prize recipient – Professor Mary Barton AO followed by Plenary: Personal resilience in a time of crisis: insights from an Egyptian prison - Peter Greste
Speakers
avatar for Peter Greste

Peter Greste

Peter Greste is an Australian-born journalist with 25 years experience as a foreign correspondent. He covered the civil war in Yugoslavia and elections in South Africa as a freelance reporter, before joining the BBC as its Afghanistan correspondent in 1995.In December 2013 he was... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 10:45 - 12:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

12:00

Lunch
Tuesday May 24, 2016 12:00 - 13:30
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Lower limb local anaesthesia in the horse: Techniques and interpretation
The 2 goals of this lecture is to spend time on how to perform a variety of lower limb diagnostic nerve and joint blocks including reviewing the relevant anatomy for each block. Then secondly will be interpretation of these blocks. A number of things can influence the outcome of a distal limb nerve or joint block including time after injection , volume of anaesthetic and location of needle placement and discussion will centre around how these can all result in what sometimes is an incorrect diagnosis. Examples of how things can be simple and complicated at the same time will be demonstrated using a variety of case examples. Blocks that will be discussed at length include the palmar digital block, abaxial block, low 4 point block, high 1 point in front and back legs, high 4 point, coffin joint block, pastern joint, fetlock joint, as well as carpal and tarsal joints

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Fulton

Ian is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists and specialist equine surgeon based at the Ballarat Veterinary Practice where he has been a partner for 23 years. Graduating from Melbourne University in 1983, Ian began practice in Kyabram, Victoria... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Ethical and economical reasons for pain management
Why is pain management important in farm animals? First there is an ethical and professional duty that has to be complied. Not only consumers but owners and farmers are increasingly conscious of animal sentience and the physical and mental consequences of pain and will look suspiciously towards vets that do not adopt minimal pain management procedures. But more importantly there is sufficient evidence that chronic pain is associated with sub-optimal performance, higher susceptibility to infectious disease, reduce product quality… It should be clear for vets and farmers that not recognizing signs in ruminants does not mean that there is no pain. We will review definitions and recall pain physiology – transmission, perception, modulation and thresholds – so that its effects on body functioning are sufficiently clear. We will present studies that have shown that effective pain management is strongly correlated with better performance (e.g. yield and fertility) by dairy and beef ruminants. Finally we will also discuss the constrains and limits – cost, residues, lack of knowledge – associated with the use of analgesia in production animals

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

VERA Poster Session: Fast paced 5 minute presentations on educational topics, including an update on the collaborative VetSetGO OLT projectPoster Session
Speakers
DJ

Dr Jen Hyams

Courses Director - Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University
Jen is a Senior Lecturer at Charles Sturt University and has recently moved from leading the Problem Based Learning program in veterinary science at CSU to a Course Director position within the Faculty of Science. Jen ihas responsibility for veterinary science and veterinary technology... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Common fractures of the forelimb
Case based lecture outlining management of the common fractures of the forelimb seen in small animal practice. Complications and successful strategies

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Career planning to build your personal reputation
Your reputation precedes you. You must ask yourself if your reputation is contributing to your career success or hindering it? A strong reputation builds your personal profile, increases your employment opportunities and income as well as building relationships with the team and clients. Learn how to determine what you want from your career and how to plan your learning opportunities in practice to create a reputation that has employers & clients seeking you out

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Wilks

Natasha Wilks

Helping Veterinarians Succeed in their Career & Improve their Wellbeing, High Performance Vets
Dr Natasha Wilks is a Veterinarian with 17 years experience and a Life & Executive Coach with over a decades experience. Natasha created High Performance Vets in 2011 to help veterinarians regain their passion and succeed in practice. She addresses the many issues that veterinarians... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

The relaxation response to reduce anxiety
Anxiety disorders in animals are characterised by physiological signs associated with dominance of the sympathetic nervous system. Successful treatment of behaviour cases relies upon developing a reliable relaxation response in the patient. The relaxation response describes the physiological state where the parasympathetic response dominates. In the parasympathetic dominate state the brain is calm and the limbic system is subordinate to the higher executive functions allowing formation of declarative or factual memories- learning can occur. The relaxation response is encouraged through behavioural therapy geared towards reducing stressful stimuli in the environment, specific exercises to induce relaxation and medication to decrease activity of the limbic system and therefore decrease activation of the sympathetic system. In combination these help develop new neural pathways that control behaviours such as remaining calm, relaxed and responsive to the owner

Speakers
JL

Jacqui Ley

VBSA/MVSC
Dr Jacqui Ley is a Registered Veterinarian Specialist in Behavioural Medicine with over 15 years of experience in this field. This means she is qualified to a specialist level in dog behaviour, cat behaviour or just about any other animal’s behaviour. Dr Jacqui Ley has a fellowship... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Do animals know what’s good for them? - Aligning animal preferences and their biological needs in welfare studies
As animal welfare has become an increasingly important issue, there has been a focus on what constitutes animal welfare and how we can measure it. One approach has been to try to measure how the animal itself perceives its situation. Another approach has been to measure the biological function of the animal, through changes in physiology or health. Animal preferences may provide some insight into how an animal perceives its situation through indicating which of two or more choices it desires. However, the question is often asked – ‘Is this particular preferred choice good for them?’ This paper examines what we know about the links between animal preferences and their biological needs

Speakers
avatar for Professor Andrew Fisher

Professor Andrew Fisher

Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria
Andrew Fisher worked in practice in Colac in Victoria and in northern England. After a PhD in beef cattle health in Dublin, he worked for five years with AgResearch in New Zealand, conducting research aimed at improving dairy cow management. In 2002, Andrew joined the CSIRO, and researched... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Managing the transition from pasture to concentrate feeding
The rumen microbial population constantly changes depending on the feed ingested by the ruminant host. In addition, the rumen itself is a dynamic organ which responds to changes in the composition and total output of volatile fatty acids produced by the rumen microbes. These rumen changes are anatomical, physiological and biochemical. Management of the transition from pasture to concentrate feeds to avoid the development of ruminal acidosis requires matching of volatile fatty acid output from microbial fermentation to the absorptive capacity of the rumen

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Use of reflective practice in veterinary undergraduate education
The ability to reflect on experience in order to maximise learning, and also identify areas of learning need are often cited as core professional values for veterinary surgeons, doctors and allied health professionals. The challenge of integrating reflective practice in to a crowded veterinary science curriculum is not insignificant. This presentation will focus on two instances of guided reflection for veterinary science students. The first is the use of Driscoll’s (1994) model of reflection (“what, so what, now what?”) applied to a learning situation for first year students. The second is a more demanding task for final year veterinary students, who are asked to provide a reflection on a clinical situation to which their peers can then respond via a discussion forum. This model is also expanded in to a mini clinical audit that students undertake. Fostering of reflective practice within workplace learning is thus made explicit. Driscoll, J. (1994). Reflective practice for practise. Senior Nurse, 14(1), 47

Speakers
DS

Dr Sarah Pollard-Williams

Sarah graduated from the UK, and spent several years working in companion animal practice, during which time she completed a Certificate in Veterinary Ophthalmology. After moving to Australia, Sarah spent 12 years working in regional Victoria. In 2011 she commenced at Charles Sturt... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Equine joint therapy: How to decide what to use.
Veterinarians are confronted with a multitude of products that are rapidly being developed for the treatment and often prevention of degenerative joint disease in horses. To say this is a challenging situation, especially for the new graduates, is an understatement. While there are some treatments that have been around for a long time with well established efficacy, more recently a variety of products are on the market to challenge these. While some are still used via the intra-articular route, many are available as oral products or intra-muscular or intra-venous drugs. The decision as to what to use, how effective each drug is and also what evidence is available to support the claims of each product will be discussed.
While the proprietary products have established information many of the more recent drugs do not and in fact many are not registered for use in horses so choosing a safe and effective product is becoming a bigger challenge for the veterinarian

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Fulton

Ian is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists and specialist equine surgeon based at the Ballarat Veterinary Practice where he has been a partner for 23 years. Graduating from Melbourne University in 1983, Ian began practice in Kyabram, Victoria... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Influencing our clients: What is possible and ethical?
Given that many veterinarians wish to improve the welfare of animals in their care, motivating clients to change husbandry can be a daily challenge. Encouraging uptake of best practice can be important for the health of the animal (e.g. canine obesity), for the profitability of the farmer (e.g. dairy cattle lameness) or public health (e.g. reduction in antimicrobial use). In human medicine a well validated approach called motivational interviewing has been shown to have a positive impact on health related lifestyle changes, such as diet, smoking and alcohol. The technique has been developed to be applicable to a ten minute consultations so is potentially relevant in veterinary medicine. Preliminary data on its potential application to UK farm animal clinicians will be presented. Alongside the potential for encouraging the uptake of best practice this session will also explore the ethics of influencing clients. For example would clients be comfortable knowing that we are training veterinary students in influencing skills? Can and should we use these new techniques to “sell” more products and services?

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Surgical management of ACL disease
Cruciate disease is the most common orthopaedic condition seen in veterinary practice. Following on from the Clinical Diagnosis lecture, the pros and cons of the major surgical procedures for dogs will be discussed. Tips and tricks for successful outcomes will be outlined

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Building resilience: How to cope with adversity in practice
Veterinarians are exposed to various challenges on a daily basis. The modern workplace is becoming more frantic and overwhelming. Demanding clients, difficult cases, a challenging workload, personal doubts and frustrations can lead to chronic stress which can wear even the strongest person down. Most people want it to be easier, but that does not allow you to grow. Learn the strategies and tools to increase your resilience so you will cope with these challenges. Aim to grow in the face of adversity and you will thrive in your career

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Wilks

Natasha Wilks

Helping Veterinarians Succeed in their Career & Improve their Wellbeing, High Performance Vets
Dr Natasha Wilks is a Veterinarian with 17 years experience and a Life & Executive Coach with over a decades experience. Natasha created High Performance Vets in 2011 to help veterinarians regain their passion and succeed in practice. She addresses the many issues that veterinarians... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Polypharmacy: What you need to know when using psychotropic medications
Increasingly there are more medications used to treat animals with behavioural problems. Appropriate psychotropic medication combinations can lead to lower doses of individual medications, synergistic effects and better targeted treatments leading to better management of the behavioural condition. Inappropriate combination of medication, apart from not improving the animal’s behavioural problem, can also lead to serious side effects including gastrointestinal problems, serotonin syndrome, seizures, coma and even death. Additionally, some psychotropic medications are contraindicated with concurrent use of some common drugs used for parasite control and pain relief. It is essential that veterinarians consider all of the drugs the animal is taking concurrently

Speakers
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

One health, culling [wildlife] and the common good
One Health recognizes that the health of humans and non-human animals are interlinked through our shared environment. One Health differs from traditional approaches to zoonotic risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread valorisation and adoption of One Health, culling domestic animals and wildlife remains a key component of institutional responses to animal-borne infectious disease. Using the threats posed by Hendra virus [HeV], bovine tuberculosis [bTB] and highly pathogenic avian influenza [HPAI] viruses as case examples, I explore how culling and other standard control measures for animal-borne infectious disease might be justified as part of One Health approaches. The purpose is to further nascent discussions about the ethical dimensions of One Health and begin to describe the principles around which a public health agenda that truly seeks to co-promote human and nonhuman health could potentially begin to be implemented

Speakers
DC

Dr Chris Degeling

Dr Chris Degeling is a health social scientist, philosopher, and veterinarian who works in the social studies and ethics of public health. At the completion of his PhD (2009) he undertook a further 18 months training in qualitative research methods and population health intervention... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Impact of fluoroacetate toxicity in grazing cattle
The results of a research project which established the production losses, direct management costs and opportunity costs associated with fluoroacetate toxicity in grazing cattle in Australia. The project, funded by MLA involved a survey of producers affected by fluoroacetate poisoning in Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia, field research in Queensland and the Northern Territory and the preparation of case studies and comprehensive analysis of the financial, management and social impact of fluoroacetate toxicity. Recommendations for management of the impacts of fluoroacetate toxicity based on the results of field and literature research will be presented and discussed. Aims – Facilitate discussion about fluoroacetate toxicity and prospective management approaches designed to reduce the economic, management and social impact of fluoroacetate toxicity

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Perkins

Ian Perkins is a resource use consultant who specialises in the interface between people, livestock and resources. He has worked throughout Australia and a number of developing countries. As Director of LPM Creative Rural Solutions, a participatory resource management consultancy... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Developing professional practice attributes using an innovative online learning resource
This presentation explains the scholarly development and evaluation of a novel online learning resource designed to develop students’ professional practice attributes. The resource is an integrated network of professional practice audiovisual-based learning objects (PABLO) that can be used as interchangeable blocks to challenge and progress students’ thinking and skills. The initial six PABLO cases focus on the core professional practice attributes of ethics, professionalism, communication, resilience and career management (Heath & Mills 2000; Leighton 2004). Analysis of published work, student surveys and interviews were used to identify challenging scenarios and develop real-life dialogue as the foundation for PABLO. These were brought to life using video vignettes integrated with engagement questions to challenge and progress students’ thinking and skills. The effectiveness of the resource was evaluated using student surveys, focus groups and usage patterns. Future plans include expansion of the PABLO scenarios and incorporation of face-to-face learning activities to create a blended approach that enhances student engagement and learning outcomes (Ellis & Goodyear 2010).

Speakers
SM

Susan Matthew

Associate Professor Susan Matthew is the Associate Chair of Veterinary Medical Education at Washington State University in the USA. Susan has a PhD in veterinary education and works collaboratively to lead international research and development of veterinary curricula, professional... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 15:00 - 15:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:30

Afternoon tea
Tuesday May 24, 2016 15:30 - 16:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Veterinary education in wildlife and conservation medicine in Australasia
Veterinarians in practice and veterinary students are increasingly aware of the need to manage wildlife health at the individual level and at the population level for conservation outcomes, as well as emerging zoonotic diseases and biosecurity. Are we meeting these needs in the curricula of veterinary schools in Australia? For example, The AVA 2014 work survey shows 20.2% of all veterinarians work in some capacity with wildlife, birds and reptiles (c.f. dairy 2.6%, beef 4.8%, equine 6.5%). Given this comparatively extensive exposure to wildlife in practice, the ethical requirement to provide effective first aid for all species and considering future work opportunities are we providing veterinary students and veterinarians with a balanced training in wildlife health and conservation medicine? This presentation will discuss the present state of wildlife health and conservation medicine veterinary education in Australia, at both undergraduate and post graduate level, and what we may need to consider to give our graduates more work opportunities in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Wayne Boardman

Dr Wayne Boardman

Wayne Boardman, a Senior Lecturer in Wildlife and Conservation Medicine and Veterinary biosecurity at the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences on the Roseworthy Campus of the University of Adelaide, is a wildlife veterinarian and dedicated conservationist who has worked in the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 16:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Companion animal Staphylococcus: how is Australia faring with antimicrobial resistance?
Resistance to antimicrobial agents and biocides in Staphylococcus species causes increased morbidity and mortality in animals and humans but their prevalence in the Australian veterinary setting is unknown. Australia is in a unique position globally due to differences in regulation of antimicrobial agents so analysis of the Australian context is important. Our studies have characterised staphylococcal infections in Australian companion animals, with a focus on resistant infections. Sample populations included clinical isolates submitted to 1) Australian veterinary diagnostic laboratories during 2013, 2) Veterinary Pathology Diagnostic Service, University of Sydney(USYD)(2010 onward); and 3) an historical freeze dried collection in USYD since 1956. Isolates characterised to date show low numbers of MRSA isolates, many of which were clones commonly identified in human health care associated MRSA infections. MRSP isolates were a more important cause of disease in dogs with many demonstrating multidrug resistance. Further work is examining biocide resistance (genetic and phenotypic) of isolates to inform infection control practices and resistance epidemiology.

Speakers
JN

Jacqueline Norris

Associate Professor in Veterinary Microbiology, University of Sydney
Jacqui is a registered practicing veterinarian and veterinary microbiologist at University of Sydney. She is passionate about providing clinically relevant infectious disease courses for veterinary students, practitioners and breeders. She is heavily involved in developing the new... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 16:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Calcium oxalate nephrosis in koalas
Calcium oxalate nephrosis is a common presentation of lethargic koalas in Adelaide. An inexpensive, patient-size and reliable method of determining the severity of the disease was sought to guide the decision to euthanase. Blood urea was measured, using dry-chemistry whole blood testing, Azostix® was used. This was correlated to elevated blood urea determined by chemical analysis using Roche. Ultrasound was used to determine the presence of crystals were present in the medulla of the kidney and demonstrated the presence of area of cortical necrosis. Urea levels higher than 25mg/dl correlated with presence of crystals in the kidney and evidence of renal damage and high levels confirm presence of this condition

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 16:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Interpreting the equine ECG
Electrocardiography (ECG) is used to examine the electrical activity of the heart. Portable ECG devices are now readily available for veterinary practitioners to use in the field. The acquisition of good quality traces is important to enable a correct diagnosis, especially during exercise when artifacts are common. Arrhythmias are a frequent finding in horses and may be physiological or pathological in nature. Vagally-induced, physiological arrhythmias may occur at rest and immediately after exercise. It is important to differentiate these from abnormal cardiac rhythms that may be of clinical significance because they can cause poor performance or predispose to collapse and / or sudden death. This presentation will explain how to successfully record and interpret ECGs in the horse, both at rest and during exercise

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Lameness in small ruminants – economical and welfare impact
Lameness is admittedly one of the most important cause of poor welfare in ruminants. For adequate management of lameness in a herd several issues should be address. First of all a validated grading scale should be used. Traditionally numerical rating scales (NRS) have been used but are associated with a reduced sensitivity to capture variations in lower levels of lameness. On the contrary visual analogue scales (VAS) are more sensitive although perhaps more subjective. By using these scales on farm it is possible to efficiently monitor the prevalence and evolution of lameness in a flock and to calculate its welfare and economic impact. Although the physiopathology of small ruminants foot diseases are generally well know, there is still a lack of knowledge on the effect of lameness on other structures such as joints and on the degree of pain present. We have conducted several studies on claw overgrowth and deformation and on the role these conditions can have on the incidence of other diseases such as pregnancy toxaemia. Other studies have looked at ways to recognize and score pain in sheep affected by foot rot. For example, facial expression has proven to be a reliable and easy way to recognize animals in pain

Speakers
avatar for Professor George Stilwell

Professor George Stilwell

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Faculty - Lisbon University
George Stilwell took his degree in 1986 in Lisbon University. He worked as a practitioner for 15 years before joining the university where he now lectures farm animal clinics. George PhD studies were on pain management in cattle. He is a Diplomate by the European College in Bovine... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Decision making in hip dysplasia
Pointers and pearls for diagnosis including gait findings, Ortolani sign, radiographic and CT imaging will be included. Surgical options including results and complications of JPS, TPO/DPO, FHNEA and THR will be outlined

Speakers
DD

Dr David Lidbetter

David is an Orthopaedic Specialist based in Sydney. He completed an Internship at The University of London, Royal Veterinary College and Residencies at The University of Melbourne and The University of Tennessee. His practice Animal Orthopaedics receives cases from all over NSW and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Physiological stress coping in greyhound dogs with or without aggression
The way a dog copes with stress could influence it’s propensity to be aggressive. This study used an emerging technique in behavioural research – heart rate variability. Potential links between heart rate variability, reactivity and the way in which an animal copes with stress may exist. Greyhound dogs (n=34) from a canine blood bank service were recruited. Dogs were individually tested during their monthly blood donation, with individual salivary cortisol measurements taken 5 minutes prior to, and 20 minutes after the procedure. During the procedure, a Polar® heart rate monitor was used to measure heart rate variability. During the following 6 months, the dogs were tested for rehoming suitability including a test for inter-dog aggression. Dogs that failed the aggression test had a significantly greater difference between the pre and post-bleeding cortisol levels compared with dogs that passed (0.97ng/ml, 95% CI, 0.11 to 1.83, P = 0.029). Mean heart rate during the procedure was greater in dogs that failed the aggression test (13.6bpm, 95% CI, 2.3 to 24.8, P = 0.018), however heart rate variability (SDNN) was greater in dogs that passed (53.5, 95% CI, 24.7 to 82.2, P = 0.001). This study demonstrates a novel method of measuring stress coping style in dogs which opens new avenues for future research into canine aggression

Speakers
DD

Dr Dennis Wormald

Dennis Wormald started his research career in 2006, completing a behavioural neuroscience honours year at the Howard Florey Institute with Melbourne University. Dennis then completed the bachelor of Veterinary Science at Melbourne University in 2010. Following two years in private... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

Antimicrobial resistance – Can we reverse the trend?
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is receiving global interest as an imminent threat, in which common infections could harm or kill again. AMR is also an emerging issue for Australia’s food and agriculture export industries as a potential, new technical barrier to trade. Fighting AMR is one of the strategic pillars for the Australian Veterinary Association and a joint focus of the Australian Government Departments of Agriculture and Water Resources, and Health. So significant is this issue that there have been calls to make AMR a national health or security priority in Australia, as has been done in other countries. The presentation aims to create awareness amongst Australian veterinarians and give a sense of the pace and energy of current international and national drivers, trends and mitigating actions towards AMR in animal and public health sectors. The presentation will also provide an opportunity for individual veterinarians to reflect whether their use of antibiotics could be modified, reviewed or updated in order to reduce the prospect for AMR in Australian animals and the broader community

Speakers
DL

Dr Leigh Nind

As a Principal Veterinary Officer within Epidemiology and One Health section of the Animal Health Policy Branch (Biosecurity Animal Division) of the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR), Leigh conducts activities to enhance the national approach... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30

Cross-fostering in the critically endangered brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata)
Cross-fostering in macropods was first described 50 years ago and is now being used as a conservation tool for the critically endangered brush-tailed rock-wallaby. Advantage is taken of the BTRW’s diapause joey, resulting from a mating within 24 hours of birth and then activation of a 28 day pregnancy, when suckling ceases. Pouch young are removed at 14 – 28 days of age from the conscious donor while the surrogate yellow-footed rock-wallaby is being anaesthetised and her similar aged pouch young is being euthanased. The same teat must be used for the cross-foster and is guided into the donor pouch young mouth using fine forceps. The BTRW young stays in the pouch for about the same time as the surrogate’s natural young. There appear to be no adverse behavioural traits in the cross-fostered young and they have successfully bred with their own species. Two out of three cross fosters result in young at foot but not all failures can be attributed to the procedure itself. This procedure has doubled the population growth rate of the species and has allowed a captive population to become established

Speakers
DD

Dr David Schultz

David Schultz graduated from Sydney University at the end of 1966 and was the first full time veterinarian at the Adelaide Zoo. It was a conservation ethic that drew him to the zoo initially in 1984 and he has been associated with the organisation and all its foibles ever since


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:30 - 17:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30

Veterinary infection control: a mismatch between university and clinical placements
Extramural placements (EMPs) in private practice are an integral part of veterinary undergraduate training. Their purpose is to prepare students for professional life by enhancing their clinical and non-clinical skills. Previous research has shown that veterinary infection control (IC) needs to improve in Australia. The aim of this study was to survey final veterinary students from two Australian Universities in order to determine the role of EMPs in the development of IC skills. Students were asked questions about their zoonotic risk perceptions, their IC knowledge and their IC experiences during their EMPs. Most assessed zoonotic risks adequately and had a good knowledge of IC principles. However, some reported following substandard IC measures during their EMPs, despite identifying this as a problem. This was done to conform to the professional identity portrayed by their EMP mentors. To sustainably improve veterinary IC in Australia the quality of IC training during EMPs needs to be addressed

Speakers
MD

Ms Diana Mendez

Diana Mendez is a French veterinarian who has lived in Australia since 1996. She holds a Master of Public Health from James Cook University where she has worked as a researcher for 17 years on a variety of projects in the fields of wildlife diseases, zoonoses, infection control and... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:30 - 17:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30

Humans, cats, seagulls and carbapenemases: a microbiological enigma
Carbapenem resistance is a growing issue in human health and an emerging issue in Veterinary Medicine. This presentation will use a recent companion animal case study to illustrate the importance of a One Health approach to the emergence of multidrug-resistant superbugs in Australian animals.

Speakers
DD

Dr Darren Trott

Professor Darren Trott is a veterinarian and microbiologist with research interests including zoonotic, companion and production animal bacterial diseases, focusing on population genetics, molecular epidemiology, microbial pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance and development of new... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 16:30 - 17:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Reintroduction of the western quoll (idnya) to South Australia
Rabbits remain one of Australia’s most significant pest animals, even at extremely low abundance. Returning a native rabbit predator to fox baited reserves was proposed to assist managing this unsustainable over-grazing by pest rabbits. In South Australia, the largest mammalian carnivore legally possible in the Flinders Ranges was the western quoll (Dasyurus geoffroii). This native predator was lost from the region in the 1880s. A bold conservation program is returning the western quoll to the unfenced Ikara Flinders Ranges National Park (SA). After 6 years of planning 42 quolls, almost all from south-west Western Australia, were released in 2014 and another 37 this year. This project has been a very successful collaborative effort between state governments and a non-government Foundation. FAME (Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species Inc) is sourcing the significant funding required, with the quolls, almost entirely sourced by WA Department of Parks and Wildlife, released onto a reserve that the SA Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources has been fox baiting for over 20 years. This reserve is now co-managed with its traditional Adnyamathanha owners, for which the western quoll (idnya) is very important. Into this partnership has been added the expertise of Zoos SA, undertaking autopsies of dead quolls to assist identification of the primary cause of mortality (feral cats), rearing orphaned babies and treating injuries. In this presentation I will outline the reintroduction process, from sourcing historical accounts to justify the proposal to having quolls born on the Ikara Flinders Ranges National Park for the first time in about 130 years. My Zoos SA colleague Ian Smith will in his talk then highlight the crucial role wildlife vets have played in the project, especially in the critical phase of establishing the new population. During this extremely vulnerable period when saving as many animals as possible to breed can make an exponential difference, the veterinary contribution of Zoos SA has been invaluable. This talk seeks to both highlight an amazing conservation project as well as the value, both ways, in collaborations between ecologists and wildlife vets

Speakers
DD

Dr David Peacock

David has worked for the State Government for over 20 years. Formerly a national park ranger, his life changed direction when he experienced first-hand the impact and benefits of the new rabbit biocontrol agent rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) on the Flinders Ranges National... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Framing supervisor views of veterinary student performance in the workplace
The competency of veterinary students in their final year is often assessed by rating their performance during training in the workplace, however little is known about what informs supervisor’s ratings. In this study, semi-structured interviews were analysed to characterise supervisor’s depictions of students they rated as excellent, marginal and weak. Twelve themes emerged from the data, with nine reflecting the following aspects of the student performance: engagement, trustworthiness, knowledge, application of knowledge, technical skills and animal handling, communication, social interactions, personal functioning and caring for animals. Three other themes went beyond descriptions of the student’s performance to involve the student’s destiny, impact on the supervisor, and the difficulty in judging their competency. For the most part, the themes discussed by supervisors aligned well with the themes in the marking scheme used for workplace assessments, but they differed in emphasis from the graduate outcomes for the programme

Speakers
DL

Dr Liz Norman

Liz came from a practice background to university clinical practice and is now the Assistant Dean for Assessment and Learning in the Institute of Veterinary, Animal, and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University and Director of the distance Master of Veterinary Medicine programme... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Global elimination of dog-mediated rabies - is the One-Health approach working and the role of NGO’s
The tripartite approach with WHO and OIE in collaboration with FAO and supported by Global Alliance for Rabies Control are on a mission to eliminate dog-mediated rabies globally. Workshops have been conducted involving human public health and animal health sectors to develop road maps to assist in achieving the elimination of rabies, a 100% preventable zoonotic disease which still causes tens of thousands of human deaths annually. Over the past year we have seen rabies outbreaks close to Australia in Bali and Malaysia, with governments still responding to control these outbreaks with mass culling of dogs. Vets Beyond Borders has successfully assisted in eliminating rabies from the state of Sikkim, in India, by having local champions and addressing key stakeholder needs. By assessing this state wide Animal Birth Control and Antirabies program and comparing this program with the response to the rabies outbreaks in Malaysia and Bali much can be learnt for rabies contingency planning.

Speakers
DA

Dr Andrea Britton

Dr Andrea Britton is an independent veterinary consultant who is passionate about animal welfare and public health. Her upbringing on a sheep/beef cattle property in the central west of NSW and studying public health in India lead to her taking up a Director role with Vets Beyond... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Causes of poor performance in the equine athlete and the investigative approach to such cases
Horses are frequently presented for the investigation of poor athletic performance. However, this may present a diagnostic challenge to the veterinarian since many abnormalities are not immediately obvious on a resting examination. Indeed, there are many problems that the horse can cope with at low levels of competition but become manifest when athletic demands are increased. Clinical exercise testing is therefore frequently required in order to make a definitive diagnosis in horses presenting with exercise intolerance or poor athletic performance. It should be noted that poor performance is frequently multifactorial and hence a thorough investigation of each body system is warranted. This presentation will discuss the possible causes of poor performance and describe the diagnostic investigations that may be performed

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

The effect of shearing on sheep feeding and behaviour
Sheep for live export may be shorn in the immediate period before shipping, to limit wool cover and so improve heat loss. Shearing can contribute to increased stress, and there are concerns this may lead to inappetance. In this study, 600 sheep were fitted with Radio Frequency Identification tags detected by antennae, to determine time and frequency of feed and water trough attendance. The sheep were shorn on day 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, and compared to an unshorn group. Ethograms were generated through analysis of video footage of the sheep taken one hour after shearing. There was no difference in time spent at feed or water troughs between any treatment groups on any day, nor any behavioural states or events. This suggests that shearing may occur on any day during the pre-embarkation feedlot period, and that current management practices do not disrupt time spent feeding

Speakers
TC

Teresa Collins

Murdoch University
Teresa is Senior Lecturer, Animal Welfare and Ethics in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Murdoch University     Teresa’s passion for animal welfare was first sparked by her vet degree (U Sydney), developed further during her PhD at Children’s Medical Research Institute... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Pain management for intra-operative and immediately post-operative orthopaedic patients
Pain management begins with a thorough evaluation of the patient's pain level and pain management history.   Control of pain is essential prior to induction, allowing a smoother induction process and minimizing patient stress.  In some cases, the analgesics used as part of the premedication are sufficient analgesia for the intra-operative period.   Opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local anaesthetics, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and anti-epileptics drug are options for premedication that aid in intra-operative analgesia.  For cases in which additional analgesic is required, the use of ketamine, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, opioids, and local anaesthetics as bolus, intramuscular, epidural or as constant rate infusion should be considered.  Immediately post-operative care includes the above mentioned drugs but can also include cold or heat therapy, depending on the injury, topical local anaesthetics, and laser therapy.  Monitoring the immediate post-operative period is essential to avoid hypothermia or the stoic sedate patient.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Separation anxiety in dogs: a review of current knowledge
Separation anxiety is one of the most common behavioural problems in dogs and has very important effects on their welfare. A brief summary of the epidemiology and clinical signs f separation anxiety will be given in the lecture. Although some dogs with separation anxiety show hyperattachment to their owners, many others don´t, suggesting that separation anxiety has many different causes. Conditioned fear has long been proposed as one cause of separation anxiety in dogs that do not have hyperattachment, whereas more recent research indicates that other dogs may develop separation anxiety as a result of “inadequate” attachment. The reasons leading to such “inadequate” attachment as well as its implications for the prevention of separation anxiety will be explained in the lecture. Another aspect of separation anxiety that has been recently revisited is the treatment protocol. In contrast to traditional recommendations, it has now been suggested that providing cues that allow the dog to distinguish between actual and “fake” departures may have a positive effect both on its welfare and on the resolution of the problem, as the dog’s perception of control and predictability is increased. The details and practicalities of the suggested treatment protocol will be discussed in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

17:00

Trace mineral injection enhances antibody response to botulism vaccination
A field survey conducted in 2015 by NT DPI found that, on average, only 67% of cattle within vaccinated herds were considered protected against botulism. Kelly and Fordyce (2014) suggested that a blood antibody ELISA level over 0.45 was protective against botulinum toxin challenge. This study also found significant differences between vaccine types in reaching this level of protection. The ‘water in oil in water’ adjuvant vaccine provided a higher level of protection than traditional botulism vaccines. Arthington & Havenga (2012) found that concurrent use of a 4-way trace mineral injection with a multivalent modified live respiratory vaccine significantly increased the production of neutralising antibody titres. In the current randomised controlled clinical field trial in QLD, repeat blood samples were taken from weaner cattle that had either received botulism vaccination alone (control) or botulism vaccination and a 4-way trace mineral injection (treatment group). Twenty eight days after vaccination, 90% of the treatment group had reached a botulism antibody titre of 0.45 compared to only 75% in the control group. The mean titre level in the treatment group was 0.96 compared to 0.74 in the control group. These results demonstrate that concurrent use of a 4-way trace mineral injection with a botulism vaccine may assist more cattle in developing protective levels of botulism antibodies

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Ball

Matthew Ball

Virbac
Currently employed as Technical Services Manager in Virbac, Matthew Ball graduated as a veterinarian from Sydney University in 1999. He worked in rural mixed practice for 6 years before setting up as a sole trader. He completed a Graduate Diploma of Education and worked for three... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:00 - 18:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30

Developments in veterinary school accreditation locally and internationally
Changes have been occurring in the accreditation of veterinary schools since AVBC was established in 2000. In Australasia a new set of 12 accreditation standards apply from February 2015. These will be outlined. Internationally, members of the International Accreditors Working Group including Australia and New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the USA plus Canada now have adopted and adapted an accreditation matrix check list developed by the AVMA Council on Education to improve each of their accreditation processes. The manifold advantages arising from these developments for the profession, public and the veterinary schools will be outlined.
The Australasian Veterinary Boards’ Council has also supported moves to assure that standards applied in this region meet best practice. To this end, the AVBC accreditation process was invited to submit to the United States Department of Education for its Accreditation. It was accredited by the USDE as an approved veterinary programme accreditor along with the AVMA and the RCVS Education Committee. This is evidence that the AVBC accreditation policies, procedures and processes meet the highest international standards.
AVBC have also set a goal of interacting with veterinary schools and organisations in the Asian region to work together to develop veterinary accreditation standards in the region. Interest in veterinary accreditation in the region has been stimulated by the development of OIE minimum competencies for veterinary graduates and also the support by OIE for twinning programs to enhance the level of veterinary education

Speakers
NW

Norman Williamson

Australasian Veterinary Boards Council
Professor Norm Williamson graduated from Melbourne University in 1968 and did an MVSc in cattle reproductive health management and an MANZCVS in the medicine and preventive medicine of dairy cattle. He spent the 1980's as Professor of Theriogenology and Herd Health at the University... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:30 - 18:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30

Camp dogs, communities and collaboration
Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are often a hive of activity with swarms of fly-in-fly-out service providers – including veterinarians – delivering a suite of essential services. Whilst these service providers all do important and essential work, from a One Health perspective, there is seldom collaboration both within and between disciplines. In achieving optimal health and wellbeing for people, animals and the environment, the benefits of a collaborative One Health approach have been well documented. In this presentation, AMRRIC makes a case for improved collaboration between service providers in rural and remote Indigenous communities, so that there can be improved benefits to the health and wellbeing of people, animals and their environment.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Bonny Cumming

Dr Bonny Cumming

Veterinarian and Project Coordinator, AMRRIC
AMRRIC (Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities) is a national not-for-profit charity that uses a One Health approach to coordinate integrated veterinary and education programs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Our One Health approach recognises... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:30 - 18:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

17:30

Western Quolls: native animal reintroductions, a veterinary DIY guide
Australia’s has one of the worst mammal extinction rates in the world with around 30% of our non-bat, mammal species classified as threatened. Many programs have, therefore sprung up to address such losses, both locally and more widespread, to re-establish populations or even just to evaluate the status quo of species abundance in an area. The vast majority of these projects are concerned with managing populations or assemblages of populations (landscapes), as opposed to an individual animal focus, and therefore the role of ecologist/biologist holds a substantial sway. Unfortunately, in my experience, many ecologist are initially resistant to veterinary involvement for reasons that can only be speculated upon: professional pride, perceived costs, past experiences or misunderstandings with individual vets, or the isolation of the project site. There are many avenues in a reintroduction program where veterinary input can enhance the project: the disease risk assessment and pre-release testing or surveillance, the ethics application and the species recovery plan preparations, and the clinical support for diseased or injured animals with necropsy investigation of any mortalities. Using our experiences with the Western Quoll reintroduction program in the Flinders Ranges (SA) I hope to demonstrate how from a veterinary perspective we can continue to build this relationship with ecologists for the benefit of the current and future, hopefully collaborative, projects. I will also elaborate on the benefits for the individual vet professionally and generally as a team building exercise for their practice, and lastly what we, at Zoos SA, offer in the way of support and mentoring to local clinics that are willing to become involved is such projects

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Smith

Ian Smith is the senior veterinarian at Zoos SA based at Adelaide Zoo for the last five years, and at Monarto Zoo for the seven year before that. He has also worked at Werribee Zoo and at the zoos of the London Zoological Society. He is the proprietor of “ZooVet” which provides... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 17:30 - 18:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

18:00

Happy Hour
Tuesday May 24, 2016 18:00 - 19:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

19:00

ASAVA Recent Graduate Dinner (2013-2015)
A casual dinner for 2013-2015 graduates to share stories of their first years in practice with members of the ASAVA executive committee and peers. This is an ASAVA member and partners only event and numbers are strictly limited.

SIG member: complimentary (limited numbers)
SIG member guest and non-veterinarian:$110
Kindly supported by

Sponsors
avatar for Hill's

Hill's

Founded more than 75 years ago with an unwavering commitment to pet nutrition, Hills' mission is to help enrich and lengthen the special relationships between people and their pets. The right nutrition combined with the devotion of veterinary professionals can transform the lives... Read More →


Tuesday May 24, 2016 19:00 - 22:30
Social Events

19:30

Australian Veterinary Behaviour Interest Group (AVBIG) Social dinner
Bollywood Indian restaurant, 17 Leigh Street, Adelaide
www.bollywoodindianrestaurant.com.au

Join us for a casual banquet style dinner in the heart of Adelaide city, and catch up with colleagues with a common interest in behaviour. The restaurant is walking distance from the convention centre.

SIG member: $45
SIG Partner/Guest: $45
AVA member: $60
AVA student or new graduate member: $45
Non member: $120

Tuesday May 24, 2016 19:30 - 22:00
Social Events

19:30

Australian Veterinarians in Industry (AVI) 'AVI Annual Conference Dinner'
Apothecary 1878
118 Hindley Street, Adelaide
www.theapothecary1878.com.au/

Come and meet up with Industry colleagues for a 2 course dinner and drinks.

AVA member: $100
SIG Member/Partner/Guest: $80
AVA student or new graduate member: $80
Non-member: $200

Tuesday May 24, 2016 19:30 - 22:30
Social Events

19:30

Integrative Veterinarians Australia (IVA) Social dinner
Good Life Modern Organic Pizza, 42 Jetty Road, Glenelg, Adelaide
http://www.goodlifepizza.com/

Meet colleagues from all areas of the profession with an interest in Integrative medicine for a casual dinner. After lectures catch a ride on public transport down to beautiful and historic Glenelg. Take in the ocean and the pier and watch the sun go down over the water. Meet at the restaurant at 7.30pm

Cost:
Food - $30 per person set menu
Drinks - are additional

Tuesday May 24, 2016 19:30 - 22:30
Social Events

19:30

Veterinarians in Education Research and Academia (VERA)
Jolleys Boathouse Restaurant
1 Jolleys Ln, Adelaide
(08) 8223 2891
www.jolleysboathouse.com

Join colleagues for dinner in the upstairs Loft of Jolleys boathouse, with fabulous views over the river and parklands.

AVA member: $80
SIG Partner/Guest: $80
AVA student or new graduate member: $80
Non-member: $160

Tuesday May 24, 2016 19:30 - 22:30
Social Events
 
Wednesday, May 25
 

06:45

08:00

Sedation and anaesthesia for foals and pregnant mares
Anaesthesia of the pregnant mare or neonate can be difficult for a new or experienced anesthetist due to the seasonal nature of breeding and foaling.   As soon as you feel comfortable using sedation or anaesthetics in this population, the season ends and you get about six months to forget everything you have learned.  A review of the basics  for this population every winter/early spring is useful to stay prepared.   A neonate is very sensitive to any painful stimulus, necessitating good handling techniques.  Neonates are sensitive to the vasodilatory properties of anaesthetics.  In addition, they are also prone to hypoglycemia and hypothermia.  Some anaesthetics require significant hepatic metabolism, prolonging the effects of the drug in a population of animals with immature hepatic function.  Anaesthesia of the pregnant mare should be focused on maintaining oxygenation and perfusion (as with any anaesthetic patient) but with extra care in the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative periods.   Mares have decreased bone density post foaling and require strength and assistance from anaesthesia.  Monitor blood electrolyte levels (supplementing calcium if needed) and assist recovery with ropes to avoid fracture.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Treating peri-urban small ruminants
Small ruminants are very popular pets and companion animals. Owners commonly seek high quality individual medicine and surgery for these pets just as they would for their other companion animals. These owners are found everywhere, though in my experience most often encountered on “hobby farms” in peri-urban areas. These owners may come from a livestock back ground, though more commonly they have little experience. They commonly are starving for an eager veterinarian to help them learn and provide them with advice. We will focus on high quality individual animal medicine and surgery for sheep, goats, and South American camelids. I hope to build the confidence of the veterinarians that may be hesitant to see the family pet alpaca, and also to exchange some tips with the seasoned show sheep veterinarians. Integrating individual animal small ruminant medicine can be very rewarding to your practice. We will cover a wide range of topics including sedation, urolithiasis, gastrointestinal parasites and dystocia including caesarean section success tips.

Speakers
DB

Dr Brandon Fraser

Dr. Brandon Fraser is a specialist veterinarian as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine- Large Animal. Currently he is a large animal clinician and the director of the Gatton Campus Farm Animal Ambulatory Service at the University of Queensland. He received... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Developments in animal ethics and initiatives to reduce animal use
It is not difficult to see that humans (and our veterinary patients) have benefitted from animal research conducted in the last few hundred years. However, alongside this progress, there has been increasing community concern internationally on the use of animals. On the whole, there is community support for animal use in research and teaching. However, this support comes with a condition to conduct it in an ethical manner, which in turn has created increasing demand for transparency in animal use.  Within the context of research and teaching, one of the main philosophical issues of animal ethics relates to balancing the relative interests of humans and non-human animals. The laws governing animal research and teaching attempt to achieve this balance. In Australia, this consists of state laws (such as the New South Wales Animal Research Act and Regulation) and a national Code (the Australian Code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes). This Code was established in 1969 on the initiative of the scientific community – the users of these animals. The Code requires all institutions involved in the use of animals for research or teaching to have an Animal Ethics Committee (AEC), whose responsibility it is to ensure that animal use is justified and that the principles of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) are adhered to.  This talk discusses the complexities of animal ethics at a large tertiary education and research institution, the strategies employed by the institution to manage and address associated challenges, and the role of the institution's Animal Welfare Veterinarian within this complex environment.

Speakers
DJ

Dr Jinny Oh

Dr Oh is a veterinarian who started in small animal general practice and completed a post-graduate internship at the University of Sydney. She is currently completing a Master of Business Administration degree at the Macquarie Graduate School of Management. She has spent the last... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Rehab widgets and gadgets - modalities used in rehabilitation
Many rehabilitation modalities are available. Which ones work, and which ones don’t for what conditions? This lecture will review therapeutic laser, therapeutic ultrasound, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, extracorporeal shockwave treatment, and pulsed electromagnetic fields.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Family violence and the family pet: The role of the vet in early intervention
The presentation will outline the facts in relation to Family Violence and will outline statistics relevant to pets involved in Family Violence. The speakers will explain the Family Violence provisions history in the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) historically and currently. The speakers will outline the Family Law Act in general, and will specifically explain the provisions relating to animals. The presentation will outline the Royal Commission into Family Violence and explain the submissions made by the RSPCA. The presentation will then explain the services offered to victims of Family Violence and the gap in services in regard to animals. The speakers will discuss what services are available to animals and future plans funded by the Victorian government to establish women’s refuges that accept pets. The speakers will discuss Family Violence training which has been undertaken by many city Councils across Victoria and will explore how veterinary practices can establish protocols to identify symptoms of abuse in pets and respond accordingly.

Speakers
MA

Ms Amelia Beveridge

Amelia has had experience in all areas of Family Law including parenting matters, property matters and international matters. Amelia has also had experience with assisting the firm’s Independent Children’s Lawyers in complex parenting matters. Amelia has a keen interest in animal... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

So it’s time to stop…what now? Approaches to weaning off anxiolytic medications
Many of the anxiolytics commonly used in veterinary practice – both short and long-acting – are not currently registered for use in dogs and cats in Australia. Furthermore the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of these medications are often based on human literature. Although the initial treatment of behaviour disorders is obviously important for veterinarians and pet owners, pet owners also need help through the weaning process. This presentation will discuss when in the treatment process to consider discontinuing anxiolytic medication and approaches to the weaning process. The presentation will also discuss management strategies and approaches to changing from one anxiolytic medication to another for cases where the first choice of anxiolytic has been ineffective or adverse effects have been seen

Speakers
DT

Dr Trepheena Hunter

Dr Trepheena Hunter (BAgSc (hons) MAgSc, BVSc (hons), MANZCVS) graduated from the University of Queensland in 2004. After working in mixed practice, she moved into small animal practice and developed a strong interest in veterinary behavioural medicine. Trepheena gained Membership... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Saving teeth - Alternatives to extraction
Alternative treatment options will be offered and discussed to extraction of teeth. Including options to treat periodontal disease, fractured with and without pulp exposure. And options for linguoversion of mandibular canine teeth

Speakers
DD

Dr David Clarke

Dr Clarke graduated from UQ in 1989 and completed a dental residency and is American Boarded in Veterinary Dentistry. He operates a referral dental hospital in Melbourne and teaches at Melbourne and Massey University
DK

Dr Kirsten Hailstone

Kirsten Hailstone is a small animal practitioner from Mt Barker in South Australia. She received a BSc in 1984 and a BVMS in 1986 from Murdoch University ion Western Australia. She is currently enrolled as an alternate pathway resident with the American Veterinary Dental College under... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Ruminal acidosis - An intensive feeding disease only?
The aetiology and pathogenesis of ruminal acidosis in the well established grain feeding model are related to the occurrence of the condition in ruminants on lush forages. There are strategies to manage the condition with beef cattle placed in feedlots off lush forage, with the management of supplemented pasture based dairy cows, and on an ongoing basis to maximise production off these high quality pastures with various classes of ruminants

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Small lot holders,their biosecurity risk and strategies to reduce their risk
Rural Australia has experienced a demographic shift in the last forty years where there has been a move from a landscape dominated by large commercial family farms, to one we now see which includes large farms interspersed with rural residential properties and weekenders. The peri-urban or small lot holders (SLH), form part of our rural landscape and bring with them a diversity that enriches and strengthens rural communities. They have for many years been regarded as a high biosecurity risk. Their lack of farming background and subsequent level of knowledge, especially of biosecurity practices, puts them at risk for the introduction and spread of exotic disease and pests. Although they potentially lack experience in certain areas, many are also knowledge seekers and are motivated to “do the right thing” by their animals and neighbours. The main concerns from this sector include the lack of biosecurity knowledge and the amount of informal trading of sheep, cattle and pigs. Informal trading means traceability is compromised and will slow or hinder control in the event of an emergency animal disease (EAD) outbreak. Any focus in the area should aim to increase compliance and must include the pig trading small lot holder as this is a particularly high risk for the introduction and establishment of Foot and Mouth disease (FMD). The lack of investment in this small lot holder extension requires a coordinated response from all relevant stake holders, to ensure better use of existing scant resources. This paper will summarise some of the strategies formulated in a workshop held in 2015 in Melbourne.

Speakers
DP

Dr Patrick Kluver

Patrick has a wealth of experience in endemic and exotic disease control. This includes carrying out research into Johne’s disease for the Victorian Government, and working as a lecturer in sheep medicine and production at the University of Melbourne Veterinary School for five years... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 09:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Equine neuropathic pain and treatment options
Neuropathic pain can occur when a nerve is directly injured or when the nervous system is altered in chronic pain states. In these situations, the nerve is the source of pain and the nervous system propagates the condition. These are the typical cases that put owners and veterinarians in the uncomfortable position of making end of life decisions. The ability to recognize these conditions early and treat appropriately is crucial. Neuropathic syndromes and treatment options will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

The financial impact of hydatid disease in Australian beef cattle
Hydatid disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus was introduced into Australia with domestic livestock and dogs during European settlement. Due to complete ignorance of the life cycle the parasite spread widely, soon becoming a major public health issue, leading to hospitalisation and deaths of many colonists. Echinococcus granulosus quickly established in wildlife cycling between dingoes and macropodid marsupials, particularly wallabies. More recently, through the development of dry dog food and the development of the highly efficacious cestocidal drug, praziquantel, E. granulosus has become less common in sheep and domestic dogs. Infection in definitive and intermediate wildlife hosts is high, particularly in the higher rainfall areas of eastern Australia. Hydatid disease remains common in cattle, particularly those grazed on pastures in alpine areas where wild dogs (dingoes and/or their hybrids with domestic dogs) co-inhabit. This study examined the financial impact of hydatid disease in a cohort of over 700,000 cattle slaughtered in a NSW abattoir between July 2013 and June 2015

Speakers
DD

Dr David Jenkins

I am a parasitologist working in the vet school at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga, NSW. I have a particular interest in zoonoses. My main focus is on Echinococcus granulosus. I have worked on this parasite in several parts of the world including Australia, concentrating on... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Rehabilitation of stifle joint conditions
Stifle conditions are among the most common orthopedic issues facing veterinarians. In particular, rupture of the cranial crucial ligament  is one of the most prevalent conditions treated by orthopedic surgeons. Equally important to the surgical technique to stabilize the stifle is the postoperative rehabilitation. This lecture will review the principles of rehabilitation for cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Making connections between human and animal directed violence, aggression and cruelty
Presented by Heather Fraser
This session focuses on “The Link” between animal and human directed cruelty, abuse and aggression, and also explores the possibility of humans and animals working together to mediate against the effects of such violence. After outlining research into “The Link”, I present my own (collaborative) work which considers some of the promising responses to acknowledgment of human-animal violence links, particularly regarding the feasibility of cross-sector - i.e. animal and human welfare sectors - reporting of abuse, already implemented in north America and the UK. I then discuss the potential of animal assisted therapies in mediating the negative effects of domestic violence and sexual abuse for humans. After noting some of the ethical and practical considerations of incorporating animals into therapeutic activities for humans, I present my own (collaborative) research into whether, and how, animal assisted therapy programs might be used with young people to change attitudes to animals and thereby potentially contribute to breaking the cycle of violence to both humans and other animals

Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Can you help me…please? Behavioural triage strategies in general practice
The majority of clients in general practice have questions about their pet’s behaviour. Knowing where to direct clients with behavioural concerns is essential in general practice both to provide the best care for the animal and to build trust in the relationship between vet and client. The challenge is achieving this is a 15 minute consultation. This presentation will discuss approaches to behavioural triage in general practice including history taking and differential diagnoses to determine appropriate outcome, including referral to general trainer, behavioural trainer, general practitioner or veterinary behaviourist

Speakers
DT

Dr Trepheena Hunter

Dr Trepheena Hunter (BAgSc (hons) MAgSc, BVSc (hons), MANZCVS) graduated from the University of Queensland in 2004. After working in mixed practice, she moved into small animal practice and developed a strong interest in veterinary behavioural medicine. Trepheena gained Membership... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Raising your dental IQ
From difficult extractions to restoratives that don't stick, many a frustrating moment can be had in the dental operatory. Case studies will be used to glean tips and techniques to improve dental procedures and lessen failures

Speakers
DD

Dr David Clarke

Dr Clarke graduated from UQ in 1989 and completed a dental residency and is American Boarded in Veterinary Dentistry. He operates a referral dental hospital in Melbourne and teaches at Melbourne and Massey University
DK

Dr Kirsten Hailstone

Kirsten Hailstone is a small animal practitioner from Mt Barker in South Australia. She received a BSc in 1984 and a BVMS in 1986 from Murdoch University ion Western Australia. She is currently enrolled as an alternate pathway resident with the American Veterinary Dental College under... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

The physiological effects of excessive heat load and nutritional strategies to counter them
Cattle suffering from heat stress have decreased feed intake, hypoglycaemia, decreased fat mobilisation (even with hypoglycaemia), and increased BUN. Peripheral vasodilation also contributes to a loss of GIT integrity which is thought to stimulate an inflammatory cascade driven by lipopolysaccharide and reinforced by leptin which severely exacerbates the chronic metabolic effects. Our developing understanding of the physiological pathways of heat stress allows us to make nutritional interventions to reduce its clinical severity and production effects

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30

Panel Discussion
Wednesday May 25, 2016 09:30 - 10:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:00

Morning tea
Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:00 - 10:30
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Organic farming, better for you and the planet?
The technological mindset that would dump billions of pounds of deadly chemicals into the soil, and mix the genetic material of different species, and build factory farms where livestock are treated like industrial commodities … has a deeply arrogant view of the natural world. It regards Nature as something to be conquered and controlled for short term profit.1
"The greatest catastrophe that the human race could face this century is not global warming but a global conversion to ‘organic farming'-an estimated 2 billion people would perish.

Speakers
BW

Bruce Watt

central tablelands local land services
Bruce graduated from University of Sydney 1976, completing a combined Masters and Residency program in food animal medicine at Kansas State University in 1978 . In 1980, he began at the University of Melbourne, including working with Dr Fred Morley to establish a health and production... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Surgical management of dynamic upper airway obstructions
Dynamic respiratory endoscopy (DRE) has been a major step forward in the diagnosis of airway problems in horses. DRE has revealed upper airway issues in horses to often be multi faceted and not as simple as we once thought. With this improved ability to understand the problem it has allowed for more targeted treatments to be undertaken. Post-operative use of DRE has lead to the critical evaluation of the efficacy of many treatments that in the past was impossible. With this critical evaluation many treatments have been modified and improved leading to improved or at a minimum more realistic outcomes. During this presentation multiple DRE examinations will be reviewed. Discussion of the benefits of standing versus dynamic examinations and what has been learnt from the comparison of the two will be discussed. Various upper airway dynamic exams will be used to illustrate the pros and cons of various treatment options. This will include laryngeal hemiplegia, DDSP, vocal cord collapse, pharyngeal wall collapse and others as time permits.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Feral cats: the greatest threat to Australia’s native mammals
Feral cats kill millions of native animals every night. Finding an effective strategy to neutralise the impact of cats is likely to be the single most important step in halting the decline of Australia’s threatened mammals. In the search for an effective feral cat control strategy, Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) has been undertaking Australia’s largest feral cat research program, delivering ground-breaking science which has led to major new discoveries about cats including new insights into their deadly interaction with wildfire and feral herbivores. Focused initially on AWC’s properties in the Kimberley, AWC’s research program involves the most detailed study ever undertaken of the density, impacts, ranging and hunting behaviour of feral cats. However, until an effective, landscape scale control strategy is developed – which may take decades – the only effective way to protect and restore populations of Australia’s most vulnerable mammals is to establish a national network of large feral predator-free areas. AWC is leading the way with plans for a 65,000 hectare feral predator-free area in central Australia – the planet’s largest (by area) removal of feral cats.

Speakers
avatar for John Kanowski

John Kanowski

National Science and Conservation Manager, Australian Wildlife Conservancy
Dr John Kanowski is a conservation and restoration ecologist with extensive experience in Australian ecosystems. John's PhD was in the ecology of rainforest possums and tree-kangaroos; subsequently, John worked as part of a research team investigating approaches to restoring biodiversity... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Principles of physiotherapy for orthopaedic conditions
NOTE: This session will now be presented by Helen Nicholson
Physiotherapy has been a vital part of patient care in human medicine for decades and research has shown that physiotherapy improves functional outcomes, reduces the need for analgesia and reduces the length of hospital stay.
Despite similar outcomes in dogs, physiotherapy is still not a standard part of pre- and post-operative care for many animals. This lecture addresses how to identify and assess problems which are suitable for physiotherapy and how to develop a rehabilitation plan.

Speakers
DN

Dr Naomi Boyd

Naomi Boyd graduated as a physiotherapist from the University of Sydney in 2004 and as a veterinarian from the same university in 2011. As a human physiotherapist, she has worked in musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy with high level sports teams and international athletes. Naomi... Read More →
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Tackling problem employees with confidence
Employee conflict or bad behaviour can bring down morale, disrupt efficiency and decrease productivity. If you have an employee with bad behaviour, this session is for you. Come discover why you hang on to disruptive team members and how you can gain the courage to confront unacceptable job performance. Attendees will walk away knowing how to communicate with problem employees such as Wendy Whiner, Never Change Nancy, Energy-Sapper Ed, Dottie Downer, Slacker Sue and Mean Mike. This session will give you the communication skills and confidence to effectively address problems when they arise at your practice

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

The use of trazodone in general practice
Veterinary visits can be extremely stressful for pets, and the peri-operative period of confinement may lead to a spike in anxiety. Providing for these patients with the use of short-term, effective anxiolytics is important from a welfare perspective. In doing so, this would help to ameliorate the situation and reduce the formation of negative associations and fearful reactions to the clinic setting. Staff safety will also improve. Trazodone, a serotonin 2A antagonist and reuptake inhibitor, is a great adjunctive anxiolytic for use in the clinic setting. It is also useful as an “event” medication alongside long-term medications (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Trazodone has a favourable, broad margin of safety. Its use generally is without significant side effects and it can be safely co-administered with many common veterinary medications. This presentation will review the literature on the use of trazodone, particularly in the general practice setting. We will also cover in which situations it would be effective, and in which situations its use should be avoided.

Speakers
DC

Dr Chalette Brown

Chalette is originally from South Africa, but has lived in Australia for more than a decade. She graduated from the first cohort of DVM students of the University of Adelaide (Roseworthy Campus) in 2013. Chalette now works in General Practice and also for Adelaide Veterinary Behaviour... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Dental disease - antibiotics and analgesics, getting the balance right
Do we rely too heavily on antibiotics when treating oral and dental related disease conditions? Conversely, do we overlook the importance of appropriate analgesia? Too often we reach for antibiotics when a patient presents with oral or dental related disease. This presentation aims at exploring and understanding the indications for appropriate antibiotic use when treating dental and oral diseases in companion animals. We will look at the underlying disease processes and current research and recommendations in human and animal fields in order to provide an understanding as to when and why antibiotics are or are not indicated. Another important and often overlooked aspect of care for these patients is provision of adequate analgesia. Our main focus in this part of the presentation will be on the use of local anaesthetics and regional nerve blocks

Speakers
RT

Rebecca Tucker

Bulimba Veterinary Surgery
Bec graduated from the University of Sydney with a BVSC (Hons) in 2007. She was awarded membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (MANZCVS) in Small Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery in 2012. Bec is currently enrolled as a resident through the American... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Cattle signs in assessment of nutrition of dairy cattle
Cattle ‘communicate’ their welfare and health through what is referred to as ‘cattle signs’. Cattle signs are parameters that can be observed and measured. The important cattle signs related to nutrition include: behavioural (particularly mentation, hair coat and body language), physiological (particularly appetite, thirst, prehension, erucation, rumination, faecal score, digestibility score, and rumen fill) and management parameters (particularly husbandry). Unfortunately, many signs do not have agreed units of measure or standards. An understanding of conditions and disorders which may cause a sign is crucial for the correct interpretation. For example, cattle (patients) non-ruminating is unusual behaviour and may indicate problems with diet quality. However, the same signs may be observed with abdominal pain, various disorders and stress. The diagnosis of a problem is based on a holistic approach and no individual measure is sufficient. During the assessment of nutrition, the prevalence of a given sign or set of signs need to be established as well at the ‘qualitative’ severity of the sign. This paper will describe how to carry out assessment of the cattle signs and why they are important in assessment of nutrition as part of herd health and productivity management

Speakers
DK

Dr Kiro Petrovski

Senior Lecturer, The University of Adelaide
Originally from Europe, Kiro started working with dairy cows at age of 11. With a lifelong interest in animals and animal health, after completing my undergraduate education Kiro worked for 2.5 years as a veterinary practitioner in Europe with production animals and occasionally companion... Read More →



Wednesday May 25, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:00

Organic farming in the Falkland Islands. What lessons have been learned?
Until recently 35% of the Falkland Islands land mass was certified organic under the Australian Certified Organics scheme. The choice to enter the scheme was largely pragmatic due to the low requirement for chemical inputs due to such things as the previous eradication of lice and keds on the islands. On the other hand whilst fertiliser would be highly beneficial the high cost of transportation to the islands makes it unfeasible on any substantial scale. In seven years many lessons have been learnt about how to produce organic wool. Many difficulties have been faced such as controlling internal parasites, while other issues arising on organic farms have driven them out of the scheme such as the lack of ability to control noxious weeds. The limitations of the organics scheme standards is discussed in light of the practicalities of farming in the Falkland Islands whilst acknowledging the benefits organics has added to farming practices. The inconsistencies in standards internationally are also discussed and the implications this has on how functional the schemes are within each country

Speakers
DS

Dr Susan Swaney

Technical services livestock, Virbac
Susan Swaney has worked for Virbac in the Livestock Department as a technical services manager since 2011. Prior to this she spent three years in the Falkland Islands working as a veterinary officer for the Falkland Island Department of Agriculture. From 1985-2007 she ran a practice... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:00 - 11:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Assessment of the rumen fluid of a bovine patient
The rumen fluid obtained by stomach tube or rumenocentesis may provide useful information on the health and function of the digestive and other systems of the bovine patient. Assessment of the rumen content/fluid is essential in diagnosis of disorders of the rumeno-reticulum and disorders blocking the passage of ingesta into the intestines (e.g. pyloric obstruction). Assessment of the sample of rumen fluid should include colour, odour, viscosity, pH, sedimentation, and using some simple laboratory equipment the rumen microbial population and rumen chloride concentration. The normal rumen fluid is of olive-green to greenish-brown colour, slightly viscous, pH of 6.0 to 7.2, sediments in 5-10 minutes and secondary floatation few minutes later. Normal rumen fluid should possess active protozoa visible under low power objective on a warm microscopic slide and should have chloride concentration of

Speakers
DK

Dr Kiro Petrovski

Senior Lecturer, The University of Adelaide
Originally from Europe, Kiro started working with dairy cows at age of 11. With a lifelong interest in animals and animal health, after completing my undergraduate education Kiro worked for 2.5 years as a veterinary practitioner in Europe with production animals and occasionally companion... Read More →



Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Fractures, what is now fixable and what still isn't
Fracture management in horses is still difficult. The initial management and evaluation of horses with a suspected fracture has been and still is extremely important. New and old stabilization options that are available, which influence case outcome will be briefly discussed. Fracture in horses from a mechanics point of view it is far more complicated than any other common species including humans in which repairs are performed. Due to these factors equine surgeons need to pay substantially more attention to biomechanical forces and how they are resisted during repair. Recent developments such as locking compression plate (LCP) technology have been a significant improvement in the equine surgeons armamentarium. These implants and improved patient management have allowed for significantly more fracture repairs to be attempted and more importantly to be successful. Adjunct options such as minimally invasive placement of repairs and improved treatment of infections, mostly by local delivery of antibiotics, have been large steps forward. A variety of fracture cases with discussion of different treatment options will be presented and discussed as time permits.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Influence of soil ecology on animal health and welfare
Soil ecology is a major determinant of animal health and welfare through its influence on the quality and quantity of nutrition available to grazing livestock. Our understanding of this and the role we have will be discussed using examples

Speakers
avatar for Colin Trengove

Colin Trengove

Lecturer Production Animal Health, University of Adelaide
Colin is a lecturer in ruminant health and production at the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Roseworthy campus, University of Adelaide. He is a graduate of Murdoch Uni in 1979; MVS from Melbourne Uni in 1991; and working on a PhD from Adelaide Uni in 2019. A career interest... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Kangaroos and cataracts. Nutrition, health and welfare of hand reared orphan kangaroos.
This presentation will examine the role of nutrition in the development of cataracts in orphan hand reared kangaroos as well as general health and welfare. I will be presenting my latest research findings which have built upon my original research published in Nature. Although it has been generally accepted, as a result of my original research, that kangaroo joeys are lactose intolerant and develop diarrhoea when fed cow’s milk, my research findings that kangaroos are also unable to metabolise galactose and can therefore develop cataracts has not gained universal acceptance. This has been one of the reasons for the continuing debate about the most appropriate milk substitute for orphan kangaroos. Cataracts continue to be seen sporadically in hand reared kangaroos, anecdotally, especially in those fed milk substitutes high in galactose. This presentation, based on my latest research will clarify the situation. The presentation will also examine the welfare and ethical aspects of hand rearing orphan kangaroos

Speakers
TS

Tanya Stephens

Haberfield Veterinary Hospital
Small animal practitioner and practice owner, wildlife researcher, an MANZCVS in Animal Welfare and MSc International Animal Welfare Ethics and Law (Edinburgh). Past member of the NSW Veterinary Surgeons Board. Long term member of the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal. Past and... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

An alternative approach to pain management for orthopaedic patients
Human patients are immediately started in a physiotherapy and rehabilitative program after an orthopaedic injury. Massage, acupuncture, stretching and cold and heat therapies are included in the treatment plans for these patients. Although it is not always wise or practical to use human medicine as a gold standard for care, in orthopaedic injury cases, we need to look to the human model. Alternative care can result in faster and stronger recovery in our veterinary patients.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Work, Health & Safety: the top 5 safety issues in veterinary practice
Work health and safety (WHS) is about ensuring the safety of workers & others within the workplace in accordance with Australian WHS law. The problem is that few veterinary practices understand precisely what they have to do to comply with the laws. In this presentation, Mark Werman, the MD of the AVA HR Advisory Service explains how to implement the five key WHS components into your veterinary practice, being: 1. WHS Policies, procedures & forms 2. Consultation processes 3. Risk management processes 4. WHS training, and 5. Officers Due Diligence duty Mark will also provide two veterinary practice case studies that demonstrate some of the practical challenges faced and the solutions developed. Finally, Mark will introduce members to the recently developed, veterinary-tailored, online WHS resources that will significantly simplify the implementation process and available to AVA members via the members portal of the AVA website

Speakers
avatar for Mr Mark Werman

Mr Mark Werman

Mark Werman – Managing Director, Wentworth Advantage After qualifying as a Chartered Accountant, Mark moved into human resources over 25 years ago. In 1992, Mark completed his Master of Commerce degree in Human Resources (UNSW). In 1991, he was part of the establishment of the HR... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Assessing welfare in zoo animals
Animal welfare has become a priority for modern zoos. Animal welfare assessment protocols must be based on the principle that welfare includes the physical and the emotional health of the animals. Welfare indicators can be conveniently divided into “resource-based” and “animal-based” indicators, the latter including changes in behaviour, appearance, health and physiological parameters. Behavioural changes are particularly useful to assess welfare and they include both “abnormal” behaviours (i.e. behaviours that are never or rarely seen in the wild and that are indicative of poor welfare) and changes in the frequency, duration or intensity of normal behaviours. Stereotypies and apathy are examples of “abnormal” behaviours, whereas changes in play, aggression and maternal behaviour are examples of the second category of behavioural indicators. Body condition, physiological measures (including measures of the HPA axis activity), prevalence and incidence of disease, and life span are also useful to assess welfare. All these indicators, however, have methodological limitations and animal welfare can only be properly assessed using a combination of several indicators. Examples of welfare indicators that can be used in zoo animals, mainly in mammals and birds, will be given in the lecture. Additionally, some recent developments in the field of zoo animal welfare assessment will be discussed

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Endodontics - what could go wrong?
The aim of the presentation is demonstrate to those wishing to advance their dental skills and treatment options that procedures don’t always go to plan as in the textbooks. Endodontic therapy covers the discipline dealing with diseases that affect the tooth pulp tissue. The two most frequent procedures performed in endodontics are vital pulpotomy followed by pulp capping and pulpectomy or root canal therapy. The common problems encountered when performing endodontic therapies include variable anatomy, periapical abscessation, presence of pulp stones, obliterated canals, inadequate equipment for the species, instrument failure and breakage, tooth fracture, tooth loss and haemorrhage. We will present cases involving the complications and attempt to describe methods to overcome these issues

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

12:00

Assessment of the urine of a bovine patient
The urine sample obtained by catheterisation, bladder massage, perineal or preputial stimulation and/or free catch may provide useful information of the health and function of the urinary, genital, and other body systems. Urine analysis is an essential step in the evaluation of the primary kidney disorders. For some diagnoses concurrent collection of blood may yield additional information. The assessment of the urine sample can be carried out on farm and in laboratory. The on-farm assessment includes specific gravity, colour, opacity, odour, pH, and presence and quantification of ketone bodies, blood, pigments and protein. Normal urine of cattle patients has specific gravity of 1.020-1.050, is straw-coloured, mildly turbid, with a slight odour on ammonia and has basic pH. Common manifestations of abnormalities for the assessed characteristics of the urine and their interpretation will be briefly discussed. This paper will briefly describe collection of urine sample, on-farm analysis that may be carried out and interpretation of the findings as part of assessment on individual cattle patients

Speakers
DK

Dr Kiro Petrovski

Senior Lecturer, The University of Adelaide
Originally from Europe, Kiro started working with dairy cows at age of 11. With a lifelong interest in animals and animal health, after completing my undergraduate education Kiro worked for 2.5 years as a veterinary practitioner in Europe with production animals and occasionally companion... Read More →



Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:00 - 12:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30

Australian Veterinarians in Public Health (AVPH) Annual meeting
Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30

Lunch
Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30

Australian Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS) Annual meeting
Wednesday May 25, 2016 12:30 - 13:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

13:30

Plenary - Challenges and opportunities for the veterinary profession from Demographic changes
Challenges and opportunities for the veterinary profession from Demographic changes

Speakers
avatar for Bernard Salt

Bernard Salt

Bernard Salt is widely regarded as one of Australia's leading social commentators by business, the media and the broader community. He is a high-profile Melbourne-based Partner with the global advisory firm KPMG where he founded the specialist advisory business, KPMG Demographics... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Causes of abnormal respiratory sounds in the exercising horse and their clinical significance
During normal breathing, very little audible sound is generated by the horse, especially during inspiration. However, obstructive conditions of the upper respiratory tract may result in abnormal sounds being produced as a result of air turbulence and vibration of the different collapsing structures within the airway. It has been proposed that the nature of the sound together with other information such as the time in the respiratory cycle that it occurs and whether the noise is intermittent or continuous may be helpful in diagnosing the cause of the condition. Indeed it is evident that, in practice, a diagnosis is often made on the grounds of the clinical history and the respiratory sounds produced. However, evaluation of respiratory sounds by ear may be difficult because of observer location (resulting in poor transfer of sound to the ear or superimposition of extraneous noise), limitations of hearing acuity and limitations imposed in differentiating between the sounds associated with different conditions. This presentation will cover the different sounds produced by the exercising horse and discuss their clinical significance

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Acupuncture for common conditions in cattle and other ruminants
Acupuncture may be utilized in a variety of conditions and integrated into your ruminant practice. We will focus on common conditions, and common acupuncture points. Unfortunately one cannot learn this new skill set in one session. This session will demonstrate the value of integrating acupuncture into the care of your ruminant species. It is great if you are already utilizing acupuncture in your companion animal patients. This session will provide you opportunities to expand your acupuncture service into various ruminant species and scenarios. Various conditions will be discussed including, lameness, nerve injury, musculoskeletal injury, reproductive performance, and gastrointestinal conditions. For example, acupuncture can be utilized in dairy cattle with reproductive problems, show animals that are stiff and uncomfortable, rams that are lame, are neonates with diarrhoea. This session will present acupuncture as another tool in your arsenal against disease and pestilence. Acupuncture is not intended as a substitute for you current therapeutics. This session is intended to be more geared to the new ruminant acupuncturist. Suggested points and series of favourite points and generic guidelines will be given. I always feel recipes and guidelines are meant to be tailored to the individual

Speakers
DB

Dr Brandon Fraser

Dr. Brandon Fraser is a specialist veterinarian as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine- Large Animal. Currently he is a large animal clinician and the director of the Gatton Campus Farm Animal Ambulatory Service at the University of Queensland. He received... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Food security, emerging infectious disease and our increasingly small planet
Delivering sufficient, safe, ethical and nutritious food in a sustainable manner to meet the requirements of future generations is one of the world’s greatest challenges. Over the past 10,000 years, the growing human and companion animal population has been sustained through the domestication of plant and animal species for use as food sources and the industrialisation of agricultural systems, without taking natural capital into account. A review of this strategy suggests that our modern systems are not necessarily optimal and, in some instances, are undermining the long-term food security and health of people and the planet. Intensification of livestock production systems has steadily increased since the mid-1880s and now dominates our global livestock food systems. It has contributed to the emergence, spread and maintenance of new disease agents through shifting ecological immunology, and increased interaction and movement of both people and their livestock. Simultaneously the diets of people and animals have changed leading to the double burden of under and over nutrition in people and companion animals.

Speakers
avatar for Robyn Alders

Robyn Alders

Principal Research Fellow, University of Sydney
Robyn Alders is an Associate Professor and Principal Research Fellow with the Faculty of Veterinary Science within the University of Sydney. For over 20 years, she has worked closely with smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa and SE Asia as a veterinarian, researcher and colleague... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Aggressive behaviour in cats
Aggressive behaviour towards humans or other cats is a relatively common complaint in feline behavioural medicine, being second only to inappropriate elimination. Cats that live indoors and those that have been obtained from a pet shop seem to be more likely to develop aggressive behaviour. The most common forms of aggressive behaviour towards other cats are fear aggression, territorial aggression and intra-sexual aggression. Fear and territorial aggression can be distinguished based on the cat’s body posture (defensive in fear aggression and offensive in territorial aggression) and the time course of the problem, which tends to be more gradual in the case of territorial aggression and more sudden in fear aggression. Intra-sexual aggression is shown between adult, entire males. Many cases of aggression towards humans are either fear aggression, petting-related aggression or redirected aggression. Redirected aggression occurs when cats are unable to direct their aggression towards the eliciting stimulus, which very often is the presence of another cat or a noise. Cats with redirected aggression may display very sudden, violent attacks. The causes, diagnosis and treatment of these forms of aggression will be explained in the lecture

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

2016 AVAPM and Hill's Practice of Excellence Awards
Presented by Maureen Revington

Small Animal Category: Wilston Vet - to be accepted by Dr Meredith Brothers (practice owner)

Mixed/Large animal Category: Gisborne Veterinary Clinic – to be accepted by Dr Dan Robson (practice owner)

Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Role of veterinarians in cruelty cases
Veterinary surgeons in the UK are often asked to provide reports to courts describing factual observations and their expert opinion on the presence or absence of unnecessary suffering. Although experts are obliged to act on behalf of the court, the quality of expert witness reports has been recently criticised. This presentation will summarise a recent review of 42 expert witness reports that describes the approaches taken to the assessment of unnecessary suffering. Whilst most reports suitably described factual observations, there was significant variation in the opinions on suffering and the actions of the owner. Severity and duration of potential suffering was inconsistently included as was comments on the impact on either mental or physical state. The necessity of suffering was also often not included in the opinion. External references supporting the opinion of the expert was only provided in a minority of reports. There was evidence of disputes between experts concerning the definition of suffering, the significance of clinical findings and the relevance of different assessment methods. It is suggested that expert witness reports should include a systematic consideration of the animal’s mental and physical states, severity of harm, duration of harm and a commentary on the necessity of suffering as defined by legislation

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

The interaction of behaviour and dental practice
Whether dental issues lead to behavioural problems or vice versa, we will discover whether the chicken or the egg is responsible.

Speakers
DD

Dr David Clarke

Dr Clarke graduated from UQ in 1989 and completed a dental residency and is American Boarded in Veterinary Dentistry. He operates a referral dental hospital in Melbourne and teaches at Melbourne and Massey University
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Audits in cattle practice
Audits can result in transformational change which can improve clinical practice, business organisation and farm management. Audits measure the value of key performance indicators (e.g. fertility indices) and the quality of processes (e.g. antibiotic selection) and identify the need for change. It is an ongoing cyclical procedure which ensures best current practices are used and outcomes optimised. It provides a mechanism for identifying learning needs and implementing evidence-based clinical and business practice. It is a powerful tool in population medicine and management. It is important to be able to assure clients and peers that the expertise and service offered is safe, effective and efficient. This paper describes how to perform an audit and why it is important in cattle practice

Speakers
PP

Professor Peter Cockcroft

Peter Cockcroft is Professor in Ruminant Health at the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide. His current research interests include BVD and enhanced ELISA using colostrum samples. Teaching interests include: clinical diagnostics, evidence-based veterinary... Read More →


Wednesday May 25, 2016 14:30 - 15:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:30

Afternoon tea
Wednesday May 25, 2016 15:30 - 16:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

AGM and Awards ceremony
Registration opens at 3pm outside Hall L next to the Exhibition entrance.
 

Wednesday May 25, 2016 16:00 - 18:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

18:00

Happy Hour
Wednesday May 25, 2016 18:00 - 19:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

19:30

Australian Veterinary Orchestra charity concert
Come enjoy a relaxing evening of beautiful music showcasing our own veterinary talents accompanied by a full orchestra! even better why not contact us to join in?

AVA member $10
AVA student member: $10
Non-member $20

Wednesday May 25, 2016 19:30 - 21:30
Social Events

19:30

Australian Cattle Veterinarians (ACV) & Australian Sheep Veterinarians (ASV) Cattle & Sheep Vets dinner
The Australian Cattle Veterinarians and Australian Sheep Veterinarians dinner is always a great night. Do come and join us at 7.30 pm for drinks followed by a sit down dinner at 8.00pm – drinks included.

SIG member/partner/guest: $125
AVA member: $145
AVA student or new graduate member: $125
Non-member: $290

Wednesday May 25, 2016 19:30 - 23:00
Social Events

19:30

Australian Veterinarians for Animal Welfare and Ethics (AVAWE) dinner
Georges on Waymouth. 20 Waymouth Street. Adelaide.

Meet colleagues with an interest in animal welfare and ethics for a sit-down fine dining experience and enjoy hearing from our distinguished guest speaker Professor David Main.

Costs include a three-course meal and beverages.

AVA member: $90
SIG member/partner/ guest: $75
AVA student member: $75
Non-member: $180

Wednesday May 25, 2016 19:30 - 23:00
Social Events

19:30

Australian Veterinarians in Public Health (AVPH) and Australian Veterinarians in History (AVHS) dinner
Parlamento, 140 North Terrace, Adelaide
www.parlamento.com.au/

Come along and join us for a casual dinner with like-minded folk. The venue is a culinary institution in Adelaide, which has been serving hearty Italian cuisine since 1988.

AVA member: $75
SIG member / partner / guest: $70
AVA student or new graduate member: $70
Non-member: $150

Wednesday May 25, 2016 19:30 - 23:00
Social Events
 
Thursday, May 26
 

06:45

08:00

Building One Health partnerships
One Health recognizes that the health of humans, animals and ecosystems are interconnected. Collaboration or working together to achieve shared goals is essential to the concept of One Health. While there was a time when cross-sectoral collaboration was promoted primarily to address zoonoses (specifically highly pathogenic avian influenza), this presentation outlines how international regulations promoting agreed mechanisms for cross-sectoral collaboration now lend support to wider, practical applications of One Health.
FAO/OIE/WHO Guidelines outline a process to establish effective collaboration mechanisms based on recognised key supporting and operational elements which include; high-level commitment, common priorities, early involvement of all relevant partners, well defined roles, coordinated activity planning, routine communication, data sharing and joint training and exercises. This development of collaboration between government ministries is explored using country-specific examples. While appropriate mechanisms depend on country/cultural context, they are essential to sustainability of collaborative linkages beyond individual relationships
The importance of identifying shared goals and mutual benefits as well as addressing data confidentiality concerns are highlighted. You will be interested in this presentation if you are keen to share experiences and wish to see One Health embedded in your organisation’s culture

Speakers
DF

Dr Francette Geraghty-Dusan

Francette is an agricultural graduate and a veterinary epidemiologist. She feels privileged to have had an interesting and varied career spanning rural mixed-animal practice, urban small animal clinics, welfare work, work with the World Health Organisation in China, Laos and Fiji... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 08:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Diagnosis and treatment of the coughing horse
The cough reflex occurs as a result of stimulation of irritant receptors within the airways, in response to noxious or mechanical stimuli. The resulting forced exhalation will aid in the removal of mucus or any foreign body within the respiratory tract in an attempt to protect the lower airways from damage. Coughing is a non-specific indicator of respiratory disease and may occur as a result of a number of infectious and non-infectious causes affecting both the upper and lower airways. This presentation will focus on the most common non-infectious respiratory disorders affecting the horse, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and summer pasture associated recurrent airway obstruction (SPARAO). The relevance of these disorders in relation to Australian conditions will be discussed and details regarding diagnostic techniques (including sampling of respiratory fluids), pathophysiology and treatment (both environmental and pharmacologic) will be covered. In addition to lower airway disease, coughing may also be an indicator of some upper airway abnormalities, especially in non-racehorses. These conditions (including epiglottic abnormalities and dorsal displacement of the soft palate - DDSP) will also be discussed

Speakers
AP

Associate Professor Samantha Franklin

Sam graduated from the University of Bristol in the UK and, following a period in mixed practice, returned to Bristol to complete a PhD relating to dynamic upper airway obstructions in equine athletes. Whilst in the UK, Sam was instrumental in the development of the world's first... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Feeding cats: the role of raw diets in sickness & in health
This lecture will discuss a holistic approach to feeding cats which incorporates consideration of behaviour and welfare as well as nutritional and dental requirements. Although there is no clear scientific evidence base for feeding ‘natural’ food, common sense in considering the evolutionary predatory behaviour of cats, and the important domains of behaviour and mental state in animal welfare assessment, suggest that feeding cats some raw meat on the bone may have many benefits. There are potential concerns with this practice, however, and skill and experience is required to do this safely. There are also situations in certain disease states where feeding raw meat may be initially contraindicated, whilst there are other disease states where feeding as a form of environmental enrichment may provide additional benefits. This lecture aims to provide a sensible, safe and practical approach of incorporating raw food into cats diets for maximal benefit with the minimal risk, and by doing so enhancing the welfare of pet cats

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Harvey

Andrea Harvey

Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine
Andrea Harvey is a UK trained feline Specialist that moved to Australia in 2011 after running the world renowned Feline Centre clinic at the University of Bristol (UK) for 5 years. She gained RCVS and European Diplomas in feline and internal medicine in 2005. Andrea has had a long... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Equine dentistry - what could possibly go wrong?
People will do more to avoid pain than gain pleasure. So if we can describe all the painful things that can go wrong in equine dentistry, we can plan to avoid them, and thus maximise the chance of getting a pleasurable experience for the horse, owner and veterinarian! The list is literally exhaustive, but can be split into the following headings: a) Getting the horse to stay still – clinical examination, sedation, nerve blocks. b) Examining and showing the problems to the owner – being able to examine properly and communicate with the owner is essential to gain the client’s confidence. c) Making the diagnosis accurately – there can be a lot of pathology hiding in the many nooks and crannies in the equine mouth, so a systematic method of listing the diagnoses and prioritising them can help to avoid negative outcomes. d) Treating the problems effectively and efficiently – whether you are extracting a cap, a wolf tooth, filing teeth, removing a tumour, medicating the sedated patient or opening a sinus, there are plenty of opportunities for iatrogenic damage, so plan well and aim to minimise this.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Liyou

Oliver Liyou

Director/Veterinarian, EVDS
Dr Oliver Liyou , through his equine practice, has hosted over 600 vets through his conducting over 40 equine dentistry post grad short courses since 2002. Through this, he has assisted many practices to develop and improve the equine dental side of their practices. He has also developed... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Neurological physiotherapy - A motor relearning perspective
Physiotherapy is a vital part of the rehabilitation of humans with neurological conditions, often commencing in ICU and continuing for many months after discharge from hospital. Human physiotherapy techniques are based on research into sensorimotor systems, motor relearning, neuroplasticity and functional outcomes. Many of the foundational studies in the human evidence base used experimental animal models, leading some to ask if the techniques would translate to the rehabilitation of pet dogs and cats. This lecture will introduce key concepts and outline the sequence of motor relearning from passive range of motion and sensory awareness, through bed mobility, transitions, static balance and dynamic balance, to gait re-education and advanced rehabilitation. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the practical application of the specific techniques described with the aim that attendees will feel confident to apply safe, effective rehabilitation techniques to their caseload upon return to work.

Speakers
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Beyond the bottom line – Practice for profit
A Chart of Accounts has many benefits for today’s veterinary practice, and is an essential tool for understanding a practices financial health. A well organised Chart of Accounts will assist your practice in analyzing financial data, facilitate useful budget creation and assist in making well informed business decisions. In this talk we will look at how to interpret data from your Chart of Accounts.

Speakers
MM

Mr Mark Hardwick

Mark has spent the last 18 years in the veterinary industry as a trainer and consultant. A founding Director of AIRC/CCG, his passion is to work with practice owners to build business. Mark specialises in veterinary practice auditing and coaching, in particular, operational efficiencies... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Is behaviour a work place and safety issue?
A systematic review of the literature and data is used to determine the importance of animal behaviour in the workplace. This presentation looks at the risks of working within the veterinary workplace and the role behaviour plays in them. It reveals an understanding of veterinary behaviour is crucial when managing workplace health and safety issues. It goes onto show an understanding of veterinary behaviour is necessary for all members of the veterinary team. This allows them to manage the animals in their care safely, to practise veterinary science to the best of their abilities and to a culture that improves the safety and wellbeing of themselves and their patients. Adopting low stress handling techniques improves the quality of data collected during clinical examination. It also improves the standard of veterinary diagnosis and care, the profitability of the practice and job satisfaction of staff, but most importantly it raises the welfare standards and quality of life of animals in veterinary care

Speakers
AO

Andrew O'Shea

Camden Valley Animal Hospitals
Andrew has practised veterinary science in the Macarthur region of NSW since graduating in 1987. Since gaining membership of the Veterinary Behaviour chapter of the Australian and New Zealand college of Veterinary Scientists in 2008 he has provided a comprehensive veterinary behaviour... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

08:00

Using milk progesterone tests to aid heat detection accuracy
The reproductive performance of dairy herds is affected by multiple factors. While the importance of heat detection efficiency is well recognised for its direct effect on submission rate and pregnancy rate; heat detection accuracy also has the potential to affect a farm’s reproductive performance. Poor heat detection accuracy can affect herd conception rates and embryonic loss. This presentation will look at the ways in which dairy farmers can strategically use cow-side milk progesterone assays to improve heat detection accuracy. The testing of milk progesterone has a potential role in cows eligible for breeding as well as in cows that show oestrous behaviour despite being previously diagnosed pregnant. The benefits and limitations of the use of cow-side milk progesterone assays by farmers will also be discussed

Speakers
DL

Dr Luke Ingenhoff

Luke graduated from the University of Sydney in 2006 and has worked in cattle practice for over 9 years. After graduation he practiced in the New South Wales Hunter Valley and the English Lakes District. Since 2012, he has worked at the University of Sydney's Livestock Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30

Clinical One Health: A formal role for veterinarians in medicine?

Thursday May 26, 2016 08:30 - 09:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Getting One Health to work: A public health perspective
Love it or hate it the One Health movement is gaining momentum and likely to be here to stay, for at least the remainder of my working life. There are a plethora of One Health courses and programs at universities around the world and the concept is even embedded as a core principle in future planning for veterinary education in the US. However, in the rush to embrace One Health have we lost some clarity about what it is we are pursuing and where it fits amongst other competing concepts? This presentation will provide a real-life example of how the principles of One Health have been applied to assist the development of a national strategy to control leptospirosis in Fiji. The successful process taken in Fiji has shaped our thinking on what One Health is and how to apply it in practice. It also clearly showed us the need to go beyond the traditional “Venn diagram” definition if we are going to get it beyond an academic exercise

Speakers
avatar for Simon Reid

Simon Reid

University of Queensland
Associate Professor Simon Reid is a keen advocate of One Health, which is an emerging international field of research and practice integrating human, animal and ecosystem health to address health hazards at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. His formal training was in Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 09:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Large skin defects - surgical options
Horses regularly injure themselves and cause large skin defects that need to be managed by equine veterinarians. These wounds can take a long time, often months in some cases to heal. Equine veterinarians often do not fully pursue available surgical options to close these defects because of cost. When the cost of bandaging and associated treatment is taken into account then many options become attractive. An option that is uncommonly used are grafting techniques which can be surprisingly easy and cheap to perform and regularly result in significant improvements in the rate of closure. The principles of initial wound management and of plastic and reconstructive surgery will be reviewed with a focus on what works and what doesn’t to allow for improved management of large skin defects. A variety of cases will be presented and discussed to cover a range of size defects and anatomical locations. Tips and tricks that are useful to improve success will be highlighted throughout the cases.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

The nutritional management of feline diabetes — an evolutionary perspective
Increasingly, cats are being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (80% — 95% Type II Feline Diabetes Mellitus — FDM). This presentation explores the role food-type plays in the etiology of this increasingly common problem. The presentation begins with a brief overview of diabetes as a metabolic disease, with varying degrees of declining insulin secretion & sensitivity, leading to its classification as either type I or type II. Recognized risk factors for FDM include age, obesity, gender, inactivity, drugs, systemic disease and genetic predisposition, while diet type is generally a minor consideration. Numerous studies confirm type II DM as a degeneration process involving mitochondria. The relationship between mitochondrial (Mt) function (determining organelle in cellular metabolism), health, diet and FDM is explored. Metabolic and related problems arising from non-evolutionary diets, where the principal energy source is carbohydrate include hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia (initially), caloric excess, obesity, lipid accumulation, lipid toxicity, inflammatory cytokines and increased ROS and NO production. Each of these is linked to Mt pathology, including Mt biogenesis, Mt morphology, Mt membrane damage, Mt DNA damage and declining oxidative phosphorylation. Each of these pathological changes is further linked to insulin resistance, declining beta cell function and amyloidosis. This sequence of events (pathophysiology of FDM) provides strong evidence for, and explains why, clinical experience favours diets closer to the evolutionary norm to both prevent and treat (all forms of) FDM. This presentation argues against feeding cats with food, where the principal energy source is carbohydrate, and presents the case for evolution-based (genome appropriate) nutrition as the obvious preventative programme and management tool for — all forms — of FDM

Speakers
DI

Dr Ian Billinghurst

Dr. Billinghurst is a graduate of Sydney University graduating B.Sc.Agr. in 1966 — majoring in agronomy and nutrition — and B.V.Sc. (Hons) in 1976. He has spent his entire veterinary career in small animal practice, where he has researched the role of nutrition as it relates to... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Lumps, bumps and weeping sores on horse's heads
Lumps, bumps and weeping sores on heads are very commonly encountered in equine populations, so learning how to investigate these is important for equine and mixed practice veterinarians. Having a list of differential diagnoses in your head before attending the patient, establishing a good history, performing a thorough distant and close physical examination, followed by a thorough internal and external oral examination are all essential. Additional diagnostic tools such as fine needle aspirate, biopsy, therapeutic trials, endoscopy, ultrasound, radiography, MRI, CT, Scintigraphy and Thermography are all possibly required to reach the definitive diagnosis and then offer the treatment options.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Liyou

Oliver Liyou

Director/Veterinarian, EVDS
Dr Oliver Liyou , through his equine practice, has hosted over 600 vets through his conducting over 40 equine dentistry post grad short courses since 2002. Through this, he has assisted many practices to develop and improve the equine dental side of their practices. He has also developed... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Physiotherapy to augment airways and ICU conditions
Veterinarians rightly demand that physiotherapy techniques used to augment their gold standard treatment of small animals with life-threatening conditions is evidence based, but when reviewing the literature thoroughly, it can be seen that many of the studies that laid the foundation for modern human ICU physiotherapy were performed on experimental dogs and cats. Of course, differences remain between experimentally induced and spontaneously occurring illness, but systematically reviewing the human evidence base allows practitioners to determine the likelihood of success of specific techniques in small animals. This lecture will compare the causes of admission to human and small animal intensive care units and review the evidence for physiotherapy for conditions common to both. Examples of cases amenable to adjunctive physiotherapy will be described, including tick poisoning, snake bite, brachycephalic airways disease, neurological crisis and orthopaedic trauma. These examples will give attendees the framework to apply techniques to safely improve the rehabilitation of acutely unwell small animals in their care.

Speakers
DH

Dr Helen Nicholson

Dr Helen Nicholson was one of the pioneers of animal physiotherapy in Australia, being part of the first class to go through the Masters of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) program at the University of Queensland in 2004 after first forging a career in animal physiotherapy in... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Bulls, bears and financial affairs- Golden rules for smart investing
This paper will demystify the often confusing world of personal finance and investing. You will learn the golden rules for investing your money and how to create personal wealth, as well as answering common investment quandaries. Should you have a fixed or variable mortgage? Should you buy an investment property or invest in shares? Is it better to be in an industry, retail or self managed superannuation fund? Should you salary sacrifice into super or pay off your home loan? Is borrowing to invest a good idea? How much should you be insured for? Are you paying your financial adviser too much? And, how much do you need to retire?

Speakers
DA

Dr Andrew Nathan

Andrew enjoyed being a vet for 20 years before deciding he needed a career change and went back to university to study the wonderful world of applied finance. Andrew has undertaken post graduation studies in management, commerce and financial planning. He is a Financial Adviser and... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

The neurophysiology of fears and anxiety. Why anxious dogs can’t learn!
Fears Phobias and Anxiety are closely linked. Veterinarians require an understanding of these responses to be able to help their patients. Fear is a neurological, physiological, emotional, hormonal and behavioural response to a threat and a comprehensive description of the fear response is developed in this presentation. How short term memory and long term memory are developed and laid down is described, along with how memory is recalled. The impact of the fear response and cortisol on these processes is looked in detail. All of this is brought together to develop an understanding of the relationship between fears phobias and anxieties. This allows the participants to understand what fearful and anxious animals are likely to learn and why they cannot learn simple tasks

Speakers
AO

Andrew O'Shea

Camden Valley Animal Hospitals
Andrew has practised veterinary science in the Macarthur region of NSW since graduating in 1987. Since gaining membership of the Veterinary Behaviour chapter of the Australian and New Zealand college of Veterinary Scientists in 2008 he has provided a comprehensive veterinary behaviour... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Factors affecting conception rate in an Ovsynch program
Ovsynch has been commonly used to synchronise lactating cows for fixed-time AI since the 1990s. Since Ovsynch results in a fixed-time AI, the pregnancy rate achieved is usually determined by the conception rate. In a year-round calving herd, lactating cows are often synchronised at the farm’s veterinary herd health visits after a negative pregnancy test or after showing no visible oestrus (NVO). Due to the use of transrectal ultrasound for pregnancy testing, veterinarians can now accurately determine the presence and size of ovarian structures at the time of synchronisation. Together with farm records and disease history, veterinarians have access to a considerable amount of information that can be used to assess the risk of conception. This presentation outlines which factors have an effect on conception rate and discusses treatment options for cows with particular ovarian structures

Speakers
DL

Dr Luke Ingenhoff

Luke graduated from the University of Sydney in 2006 and has worked in cattle practice for over 9 years. After graduation he practiced in the New South Wales Hunter Valley and the English Lakes District. Since 2012, he has worked at the University of Sydney's Livestock Veterinary... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:00 - 10:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30

One Health - A medical perspective
In Queensland, the formation of the Queensland One Health Group (QOHG), including veterinarians, environmental officers, industry representatives and medical staff, has enhanced communication between disciplines and improved understanding between the specialties with the aim of early recognition of threats to health. Although One Health is not a new concept, it is not often considered in medical practice. Six interlinked cases of canine and human Brucella suis infection highlight the use of One Health principles in medical practice. Other examples of One Health in practice include the impact of the 2011 Queensland floods on health, recognition of the importance of vector distributions in Queensland and consideration of the environment in the transmission of multi-resistant organisms

Speakers
DK

Dr Kathryn Wilks

Dr Kathryn Wilks started her career as a Veterinary Science graduate with an interest in the concept of “One Health”. This interest led to her undertaking a project in the Kimberley region investigating the dynamics of dogs in Aboriginal communities and the effect of a canine... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 09:30 - 10:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:00

Morning tea
Thursday May 26, 2016 10:00 - 10:30
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Besnoitiosis in Australian wildlife and significance to cattle
Previous work had reported on the evidence of anti-Besnoitia besnoiti antibodies in South Australian cattle (Nasir et al. 2012). Testing for B. besnoiti antibodies by PrioCHECK® Besnoitia Ab 2.0 ELISA initially identified 18.4% (95% CI: 15.8–21.0%) of 869 individual cattle sera as positive by ELISA. Additional tests by immunoblot and IFAT, however, could not confirm any of the ELISA results. The use of a higher threshold in the ELISA suggested a way to improve the diagnostic specificity of that assay. There is thus no evidence of B. besnoiti infection in South Australian cattle. Around the same time, there were reports of epistaxis (nose-bleeds) in Western grey kangaroos around Australia and including South Australia that suggested the presence, in the nasal passage of these marsupials, of Besnoitia-like organisms (BLOs). The present study was aimed at characterising those organisms further. Three clinical cases (with epistaxis) were closely examined, as well as serological and molecular assays performed

Speakers
avatar for Professor Michael Reichel

Professor Michael Reichel

Dean, City University of Hong Kong
Michael is the Foundation Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, City University of Hong Kong, a collaboration with Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. He held the Chair of Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Adelaide until the end of... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Extracting horse teeth - tips, tricks and techniques
Being presented with a horse that requires a molar extraction is daunting. Careful planning as well as being aware of one’s abilities is essential. The range of instrumentation that will be needed is large and decisions have to be made as the whether the procedure can be performed in the standing, sedated horse or will the procedure require a general anaesthetic. Many things can and do go wrong and pre-planning for these is part of the process. What is required pre-operatively? What is the best sedation regime and which nerve blocks will aid in the process? Where can the procedure be done especially if it needs to progress to general anaesthesia. What will be the aftercare? How many x-rays should be taken? All of these considerations must be addressed

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Understanding the vets role in providing services to organic farms
The Australian organic farming has increased at 15 % per year and is 1 of the top five Australian growth industries. To date most vets have poorly serviced this industry. Australia’s standards are some of the most stringent in the world. -What does it mean to be certified organic? -What is the difference between Biological, Biodynamic and Organic systems? -What are allowable/restricted/nonallowable veterinary products and procedures?-What are the consequences to individual animals/farms when non allowable products/procedures are used? -How can vets usefully service organic farms? -What are alternate modalities to treat organic herds? -Where to find specialist advice? All this and more will be revealed

Speakers
DC

Dr Cathie Harvey

Cathie graduated from Murdoch University in 1983. She worked in small animal practice and soon moved to Narrung to manage a dairy on her husband’s farm. Here was the beginning of 30 years working, managing and maintaining the health of a 300 head dairy farm. This experience gained... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Dental homecare - What's new?
Dental home care is critically important for maintaining dental health in our pets as well as for ourselves. As vets we are able to actively remove all tartar and plaque during a dental procedure but without effective follow up homecare it will all rapidly recur and drive the progression and/or development of periodontal disease. Unfortunately effective dental home care has historically had very poor owner compliance because it is harder to convince a dog or cat that brushing is a good idea compared with people, although my three year old is also yet to be convinced. There are several new products that have the potential to greatly improve compliance by making homecare easier and less time consuming. After a brief summary of the historically available options for dental homecare we will discuss what has become available over the last few years. How do these products work, what is the evidence that they do what they claim to do and how should they be incorporated into what we recommend for dental home care to pet owners

Speakers
SC

Simon Craig

Simon graduated from Massey University in 1999 and then spent the last 15 years in general practise in Melbourne, England, Sydney and now Adelaide. He gained membership of the ANZCVS in Small Animal medicine in 2007 and then Small Animal Dentistry in 2008. He sees primary and referral... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Rehabilitation of fractures
Rehabilitation following fracture repair is important to return animals to full function. As important, is knowing when to restrict activity or increase activity based on the stage of fracture healing and the stability of the repair. Fractures in and around joints are especially important for rehabilitation to help prevent joint stiffness and decreased function. In addition, fractures that are managed with casts or splints will have some stiffness of joints and muscle atrophy. Recognizing these issues and addressing them with rehabilitation are important to return to function.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

Implementing best practice solutions for complex farm animal welfare challenges
Some animal welfare problems, such as lameness in dairy cattle, tail biting in pigs and injurious pecking in hens, exist of farms due to a complex mix of management and husbandry factors. These issues present a) technical challenges in the form of how to best solve the difficulty and b) motivational challenges in making this happen. Initial research projects working on these challenges focussed on the technical aspects and produced husbandry advisory tools that aimed to quantify the relative risk and therefore priority for each potential intervention. Whilst technically valid, these approaches that relied upon a top-down knowledge transfer approach, had minimal impact on existing practice. Subsequent projects (including the Healthy Feet Project) explored techniques such as facilitation and social marketing to stimulate change. In addition to smarter communication techniques some issues can be resolved by introducing market-place (or even legislation) requirements. Examples of the later include risk factors for injurious pecking that have been introduced into certification scheme requirements

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

How to implement a fear free practice!
Stress & fear levels can be reduced in our patients by catering to the animal's natural behaviour. Simple modifications in your practice can greatly diminish anxiety. An outline of facility modification, chemical help, handling techniques & client expectations will be explained at a practical level. Drawing on personal experience gained in over 25 years of general practice, Moss will highlight the techniques he uses to implement fear free practice. It is also a good marketing strategy to set yourself apart from other vets & you will have new, very loyal clients coming in the door! Staff prefer handling chilled out cats & calm dogs as well. It is not expensive to implement but does require some habit changes by all the staff

Speakers
DK

Dr Kersti Seksel

Dr Kersti Seksel BVSc (Hons) MRCVS MA (Hons) FACVSc DACVB DECAWBM Sydney Animal Behaviour Service, 55 Ethel Street Seaforth NSW 2092 sabs@sabs.com.au Kersti graduated in Veterinary Science from Sydney University. She has a BA in Behavioural Sciences with a major in psychology as well... Read More →
avatar for Moss Siddle

Moss Siddle

Principal Veterinary Surgeon, Dandenong Ranges Veterinary Centre
Dr Moss Siddle BVSc has been a private veterinary practitioner for over 20 years. He established Dandenong Ranges Veterinary Centre in 1999. The practice has won an AVA / Pfizer “Practice of Excellence in Customer Service Award” and operates under the “Fear Free” philosophy... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

10:30

The centre for biosecurity (CEBRA) and animal disease risk
CEBRA began as a partnership between the University of Melbourne and the federal Department of Agriculture in 2006 to develop tools and techniques for biosecurity risk analysis. Initially, it functioned as a typical CoE, with marginal success. In 2009, the relationship was revised to better integrate with Departmental priorities. This move precipitated a range of new projects that have challenged the Centre's participants and generated novel and practical solutions to some long standing problems in biosecurity risk analysis. This presentation describes the developing relationship, outlines some technical developments that have useful applications in animal biosecurity, and finally, describes some of the things that statisticians, economists and botanists may contribute when working with animal biosecurity research specialists.

Speakers
PM

Professor Mark Burgman

Mark A. Burgman is Managing Director of the Centre of Excellence for Biosecurity Risk Analysis, the Adrienne Clarke Chair of Botany in the School of Botany at the University of Melbourne and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Conservation Biology. He works on ecological modelling, conservation... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30 - 11:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:00

BVD- Bits of virology and disease
This talk will give an overview over the research into BVD in our research group over the last few years. At the University of Adelaide’s Roseworthy situated School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences we have worked on Bovine Viral Diarrhoea BVD) for the past years, aiming to improve diagnostic testing protocols, including an attempt to identify the “Trojan” cow carrying a persistently infected (PI) calf in utero. We have improved on the application of diagnostic tests, validated commercially available ELISAs locally and described their performance characteristics on serum and milk, ear notches and pools of samples. We also looked at the feasibility of control efforts in this country and compared their possibility to those successfully carried out in other countries. In addition, we have explored and excluded the possibility of possible additional host reservoirs for the virus in other ruminant hosts, such as sheep, alpaca and buffalo (in the NT)

Speakers
avatar for Professor Michael Reichel

Professor Michael Reichel

Dean, City University of Hong Kong
Michael is the Foundation Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, City University of Hong Kong, a collaboration with Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. He held the Chair of Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Adelaide until the end of... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 11:00 - 11:30
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

11:30

Ben Cunneen Memorial Plenary - Disease surveillance- where we are and where we need to be - what role for a one health approach
Disease surveillance- where we are and where we need to be - what role for a one health approach

Speakers
avatar for Professor Martyn Jeggo

Professor Martyn Jeggo

Professor Jeggo qualified as veterinary surgeon in the UK in 1972 and after a short four-year spell in general practice has worked in research and research management of infectious diseases. This included spells in a number of developing countries, at the UK high containment laboratory... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 11:30 - 12:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

12:30

Lunch
Thursday May 26, 2016 12:30 - 14:00
Exhibition Halls Adelaide Convention Centre

13:00

Integrative Veterinarians Australia (IVA) Annual meeting
Thursday May 26, 2016 13:00 - 14:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Why vets should be aware of Ebolaviruses
Over the past 18 months we have experience the largest recorded Ebola virus outbreak. The source of this virus in humans for this outbreak is thought to be bats, however domestic and wild animals have been associated with previous outbreaks of filoviruses. Pigs have been associated with Reston virus in the Philippines and hypothesised by several groups to be a potential source of Ebola virus in African outbreaks. Interestingly, although these viruses do not cause disease in pigs, infected animals shed virus from the respiratory tract and efficiently transmit the virus to other animals and potentially humans. Due to this it is important that veterinarians as well as doctors are aware of Ebolaviruses.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Glenn Marsh

Dr Glenn Marsh

Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO
Dr Glenn Marsh is a senior research scientist at AAHL and Team leader for the Dangerous pathogens team. His major research interests are focused on the pathogenesis of emerging infectious disease threats including henipaviruses, ebolaviruses, coronaviruses and influenza virus. His... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Setting up for rabbit dentals
Find out how to use what for what condition in the rabbit mouth. This talk will cover setting up the table, use of the hand tools and attachments for the dental machine for mouth examination, rabbit incisor extractions, coronal height reduction and molar extractions. Lighting, positioning and supportive care during the procedure will also be addressed

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Nutraceutical therapies for osteoarthritis
“Nutraceuticals” (nutrients or food-based derivatives administered above the individual’s daily requirement for the purpose of disease treatment or prevention) and other naturally-derived “complementary animal health products” are widely administered to Australian pets with osteoarthritis. Some pet owners who wish to avoid the use or over-use of medications may elect to administer nutraceuticals or complementary products in preference to registered veterinary pharmaceutical products and in more severe cases of joint pain this practice might be considered an animal welfare issue for veterinarians. The array of products marketed for joint health in dogs and cats is vast and providing informed advice to clients can be daunting. However multiple clinical trials have been performed and published in the peer-reviewed veterinary literature evaluating nutraceutical and other dietary supplements for canine and feline osteoarthritis, although the quality of these studies and their conclusions can be variable. In this session the evidence for and against the commonly-used nutraceuticals and complementary products will be reviewed and guidelines for their ethical use discussed

Speakers
DD

Dr David Davies

David Davies graduated from Murdoch University with first class honours in 1992 then worked in general practice for several years. David returned to Murdoch in 2000 to complete his Residency in Small Animal Medicine, including stints at Massey University and the Royal Veterinary College... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 14:30
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Management of guttural pouch disorders
Guttural pouch (GP) disease in horses is an uncommon yet challenging clinical problem. Anatomy of this complicated structure will be reviewed along with a variety of diagnostic options. GP disease in Australia is mostly associated with foals in the form of tympany. The management of these cases from minor to severe and the range of conservative and surgical options presented. Techniques such as laser fenestration to gain access from the pharynx and GP septum fenestration will be demonstrated and discussed for difficult case management. The most common GP disease in adults in Australia is empyema and the associated chondroids. The management of these cases including conservative management options that are regularly successful will be presented. Uncommon in Australia but often misdiagnosed GP disease such as mycosis will be discussed with case presentation and management discussed. Rare neoplastic disease will be briefly discussed. The focus of this presentation will be diagnosis and an awareness of options that are available and the associated success rates.

Speakers
DB

Dr Ben Ahern

Ben is a senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in equine surgery. He is American board certified in surgery and sports medicine and rehabilitiation. After working in private practise he has recently returned to academia


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

A practical introduction to equine phytotherapy (herbal medicine)
Equine veterinarians will be familiar with the wide spread use of herbs in horses. This can range from horses grazing plants with medicinal properties in the paddock and the folk use of herbs to herbal mixtures being prescribed by lay herbalists and veterinarians. Herbal medicine has emerged from the co-evolution of plants and animals. Phytotherapy integrates traditional plant lore with scientific knowledge of phytochemistry and clinical medicine. Equine veterinarians have a responsibility to have an understanding of the scope of herbal medicine, traditional concepts, herbal pharmacology, herbal pharmacy, safety and regulatory issues and evidence base in order to have informed discussions with clients and colleagues. Herbal medicine offers a broader range of options for the veterinarian when addressing the maintenance of health, physiological dysfunction and chronic disease. Practicing the art and science of herbal medicine can be pleasurable and professionally satisfying.  Herbal medicine is potentially a useful addition to the range of therapeutic options available to the veterinarian who treats horses

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Team training to improve client compliance, Part 1
Today’s market is competitive. Teach your team how to use the power of communication to create an exceptional client experience that bonds clients to the practice. Participants will learn how to improve client engagement and education which will increase client trust and loyalty. This interactive seminar will provide you with practical tools and action steps that the whole team can immediately apply in order to create lasting impressions with pet owners, increase client visits, and improve compliance with wellness and treatment plan recommendations

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

Behavioural changes caused by stress in companion animals Part 1
Stress causes a variety of behavioural changes in dogs and cats, and many of such changes may have a negative effect on the human-animal bond or on the health of the animal. Stress often results in a decrease in feed intake and this is particularly common in cats, particularly when stress and diet change happen at the same time. Stress-induced anorexia in cats may lead to disease and it may appear together with a reduction in general activity. Occasionally, however, stress has the opposite effect and it has been suggested that stress may be one of the factors contributing to obesity in companion animals. Aggressive behaviour has many different causes and there is evidence that stress may increase aggression. This effect may be partly mediated by a decrease in serotonin activity in chronically stressed animals. Another behavioural problem that is sometimes caused by stress is urine marking in cats. Changes in the environment and inter-cat conflict are the most common stressors that may cause urine marking. However, urine marking is affected not only by stress but also by sexual hormones and therefore not all cases of urine marking are related to stress. Stress may also contribute to interstitial cystitis, which is another cause of inappropriate elimination in cats

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

14:00

How can certification schemes promote 'good life' and improve health?
Certification schemes that aim to provide an assurance on animal welfare have been developed in many countries. As part of a large collaborative project AssureWel, Bristol has been looking at methods to increase the potential welfare impact of schemes. As part of that work we have developed a set of four best practice principles that should help schemes deliver promotion of positive welfare (good life) and limit harms (minimise poor health outcomes). Firstly the scheme can operate a management system that co-ordinates scheme activities which actively promote improvement in animal welfare within participating farms. This management system should include the following generic steps: plan (establish the objectives including desired outcomes, scheme requirements and monitoring processes), do (implement scheme inspection systems and support structures), check (measure and monitor the process and results) and improve (take action to improve performance). Secondly the scheme should develop progressive resources and outcomes requirements that comply with relevant legislation, encourage the provision of opportunities valued by the animals, promote farm level continuous improvement in important welfare outcomes and require innovation not to compromise welfare goals. Thirdly the scheme should target its assessment and support resources on important welfare concerns. Activities should include assessment of relevant welfare requirements and outcomes, promoting interest amongst farmers in their management, ensuring technical advice is available and insisting on remedial action for those farmers with consistent poor outcomes. Finally by taking an evidence-based, participatory and transparent approach the scheme should also embrace external scrutiny and involvement. These principles certification schemes should help schemes adopt a systematic scheme level continuous improvement approach, as already used in quality and environmental certification schemes, to promote improvement at a farm level. These principles could also inform the development of an international agreed standard that could facilitate trade in higher animal welfare products

Speakers
avatar for Professor David Main

Professor David Main

Professor of Animal Welfare, University of Bristol
David Main is a Head of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group and Professor of Animal Welfare at the University of Bristol Veterinary School. His research interests include welfare assessment, intervention strategies to improve welfare and animal welfare education in farm and companion... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Unusual dental conditions in rabbits
Although incisor malocclusion and dental abscess are regularly seen dental conditions in pet rabbits, other conditions may occur associated with the teeth. This talk will describe the diagnosis and treatment of some less common presentations that occur. These include jaw tumours and fractures, severed tongues and cheek abscessation

Speakers
AF

Anne Fowler

Adelaide Bird & Exotics Vet Centre
Anne Fowler graduated from Sydney University after completing an Honours year investigating vitamin D in marsupials. Throughout her career in both mixed and small animal practice in both NSW and Victoria, she has always been interested in birds and exotic pets. Her previous roles... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

Diagnostic evaluation and cytology of synovial fluid
A systematic diagnostic approach to a patient with lameness and accurate joint fluid analysis provides important tools for the classification of arthropathies in small animals. Synovial fluid analysis should provide a minimum database for the clinical work-up of joint disease and is a critical component in determining the cause of disease. Aspects of complete analysis should include: proper sample collection protocols, gross appearance, colour and viscosity of fluid, nucleated cell counts, protein concentration measurements and cytologic evaluation of cells. Standardized methods to these steps should provide an accurate classification and differentiation of common diseases. These diseases can then be classified according to inflammatory disease, degenerative disease, haemarthrosis or neoplasia. The inflammatory disease aspect can also be importantly sub-divided into infectious and non-infectious (immune-mediated) causes. There also some limitations and challenges of additional testing procedures such as fluid culture and anti-nuclear antibody testing, that must also be considered. This presentation summarizes joint fluid analysis and cytology within the clinical pathology

Speakers
DW

Dr William Gow

Veterinary Clinical Pathologist, IDEXX Laboratories
William was awarded his Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (BVMS) from Murdoch University in 2009. After graduation, William practiced for approximately two years as a veterinary surgeon in small animal general practice in Western Australia, as well... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

14:30

An update on Australia's veterinary emergency plan (AUSVETPLAN)
AUSVETPLAN – the Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan – is a comprehensive series of manuals that sets out the various roles, responsibilities and policy guidelines for agencies and organisations involved in an emergency animal disease (EAD) response. AUSVETPLAN manuals are also used for training purposes and during exercises to ensure the plans will be effective and that personnel are trained in advance of an EAD outbreak
The availability of agreed AUSVETPLAN manuals ensures that informed decisions about the policies and procedures needed to manage an EAD incident in Australia are immediately at hand and there is no time lost in mounting the response.
Since 2002, Animal Health Australia (AHA) (http://www.animalhealthaustralia.com.au/) has worked with Members to prepare and review AUSVETPLAN manuals and supporting documents to ensure their accuracy and currency.
The first AUSVETPLAN manuals were written in 1986 – 25 years on they remain world-class. Recent updates to AUSVETPLAN resources will be presented. These include the publication of new and revised manuals, as well as the development of MasterDocs (www.masterdocs.com.au) – an innovative online collaborative software that has brought significant improvements to the process of editing of AUSVETPLAN manuals.

Speakers
DF

Dr Francette Geraghty-Dusan

Francette is an agricultural graduate and a veterinary epidemiologist. She feels privileged to have had an interesting and varied career spanning rural mixed-animal practice, urban small animal clinics, welfare work, work with the World Health Organisation in China, Laos and Fiji... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 14:30 - 15:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Longevity of immunity following Q fever vaccination
Over 300 vets (n=341) have participated in a longevity of immunity study. Serology was collected at national Veterinary conference and vet faculties at Sydney and Charles Sturt University. Demographic details, exposure history, vaccination status, and results of pre-vaccination screening (confirmed with the provider who administered the vaccine or via university health records) were collected for each individual enrolled in the study. Q fever serology was performed by the Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, Victoria using standard immunofluorescence methods (phase 1 and 2 IgG, IgM) to measure a wider variety of antibody responses compared to CFT and allow correlation with accurate vaccine history. 208 vets reported a history of Q fever vaccine and most (87-90%) were seronegative to phase 1 IgG and IgM. Cell mediated immunity (CMI) results are pending. Despite negative serology it is expected that immunity to Q fever remains given the known effectiveness of Q fever vaccine and likely role of CMI in protection

Speakers
DN

Dr Nicholas Wood

Dr Nicholas Wood is a staff specialist paediatrician at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead and the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance. He leads an NHMRC project grant titled: Q fever: How common is it and how can we best prevent it? Research to inform vaccine... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 15:30
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

When things go wrong under anaesthesia
After anesthetizing thousands of horses in one of the busiest equine surgical facilities in the world, I thought I had seen and dealt with everything. Unfortunately, horses continue to surprise me with new and strange things in induction, during general anesthesia and in recovery. In this discussion, I will share my experiences and insight into how to avoid mishaps and how to deal with them if they do occur.

Speakers
avatar for Dr Lori Bidwell

Dr Lori Bidwell

Lori Bidwell received her undergraduate degree (in Art History) from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and her DVM from Michigan State University in 2001 where she also completed an anesthesia residency in 2005. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
City Room 1 & 2 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Digging deeper - equine phytotherapy
Herbal medicine is deeply rooted in the relationships between the natural world, plants, humans and other animals. Herbal medicine has emerged from this co-evolution. Ancient traditions and cultures share similar concepts of health, vitality and disease. Metaphors from nature are used to describe these states of health and disease. The traditions of herbal medicine are empirical however there is a pharmacological basis for the traditional descriptions of plant medicines and actions. Modern herbal medicine (phytotherapy) integrates traditional knowledge, clinical skills and scientific understanding of medicinal plants. The systematic approach of phytotherapy includes the use of plant medicines for physiological enhancement and compensation. Scientific research is building the evidence base for phytotherapy, which includes studies in phytochemistry, veterinary ethnobotany, zoopharmacognosy and clinical trials. The materia medica of some herbs commonly used in horses are presented to demonstrate how the integration of scientific and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants provides a more rounded picture of the indications and safe use of medicinal plants

Speakers
MK

Megan Kearney

Dr Megan Kearney is an integrative veterinary surgeon and Medical Herbalist. She runs a veterinary hospital and practice for people in Bangalow, Northern NSW. She sees a wide range of species including companion animals, horses, livestock, exotics and wildlife. Megan was inspired... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
City Room 3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Wild dental care: keeping zoo and exotic species smiling
While animals are kept in zoos or on display, their dental care becomes a vital part of their husbandry procedures. There are many challenges when dealing with unusual species which are vastly different from our domestic pets. The anatomy is often unknown or at least poorly described and publications are often by non-veterinarians. Sometimes two different publications will have two different descriptions of the dental and oral anatomy. A skull from the species to be treated should always be available if possible. Most frequently the veterinary dentist becomes involved when a keeper notices that something is wrong with the animal. Hopefully the zoo or park veterinarians are notified and a useful description of the condition can be available so an idea of what will be required and appropriate instrumentation selected. This is not always the case and dental treatment in the exotics can be very challenging

Speakers
GW

Gary Wilson

Advanced Animal Dentistry Pty Ltd
Professor Garey Wilson BVSc MVSc MACVSc Dip ICEVO Dip AVDC-Eq FAVA Cert Teach - Gary Wilson graduated as a secondary maths and science teacher in 1971. He graduated BVSc from the University of Queensland in 1977. In 1994 he was awarded MACVSc by examination in veterinary dentistry... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
City Room 4 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Rehabilitation of neurologic conditions
Veterinarians are frequently faced with neurologic conditions such as intervertebral disc disease, fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy, and degenerative myelopathy. These common conditions are ideal for rehabilitation to help speed recovery and reduce the unwanted effects of tissue atrophy. Methods of encouraging limit and muscle use, gait training, and proprioception will be emphasized.

Speakers
avatar for Professor Darryl Millis

Professor Darryl Millis

Dr. Darryl Millis is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of CARES Center for Veterinary Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  A Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a founding charter Diplomate of the American... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Team training to improve client compliance, Part 2
Today’s market is competitive. Teach your team how to use the power of communication to create an exceptional client experience that bonds clients to the practice. Participants will learn how to improve client engagement and education which will increase client trust and loyalty. This interactive seminar will provide you with practical tools and action steps that the whole team can immediately apply in order to create lasting impressions with pet owners, increase client visits, and improve compliance with wellness and treatment plan recommendations

Speakers
avatar for Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr Amanda Donnelly

Dr. Amanda Donnelly is a second generation veterinarian and a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri in the United States. She has an MBA from Baker University in Kansas and she also holds a certificate in Veterinary Practice Administration from... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
Hall M Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Behavioural changes caused by stress in companion animals Part 2
Repetitive behaviours are often related to stress and are potential indicators of poor welfare. Repetitive behaviours include pacing, over-grooming, self-mutilation and fly-biting, among many others. Repetitive behaviours may be caused by a variety of medical conditions and therefore a complete medical check-out must be the first step in the diagnosis. Very often, however, repetitive behaviours are shown by apparently healthy animals and appear to be caused by a sub-optimal environment. Chronic stress, inability to perform highly motivated behaviours and repeated conflict situations can result in animals developing repetitive behaviours. Some individual animals seem to be more predisposed to develop repetitive behaviours when the environment is inadequate and such predisposition results from a combination of genetic factors and early experience. Once initiated, repetitive behaviours may be perpetuated through several mechanisms, including learning. Treatment of repetitive behaviours should include changes in the environment, advising the owner not to reinforce the behaviour and, in some cases, pharmacological treatment. Pharmacological treatment is based on the fact that in some cases repetitive behaviours are associated to changes in serotonin and / or dopamine activity in the brain

Speakers
avatar for Dr Xavier Manteca

Dr Xavier Manteca

Xavier Manteca Vilanova received his BVSc degree from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare from the University of Edinburgh. He also has a PhD from the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently, he is professor at the... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
Hall N Adelaide Convention Centre

15:00

Urolithiasis in Ruminants – Prevention and Management
An understanding of the aetiology of urolithiasis has virtually eliminated the condition in large commercial beef feedlots. However, the condition still occurs in opportunity feedlots and in lamb feedlots. The reasons for this can lie in prior supplementation history and the mineral concentrations of stock water in extensive grazing systems prior to introduction to concentrate feeding, inappropriate diet formulations, the feeding of concentrates separate to roughage, and possibly in extended feeding periods associated with inadequate dietary nutrient density and poor feeding practices

Speakers
avatar for Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Associate Professor Paul Cusack

Principal, Australian Livestock Production Services
Veterinarian, ruminant nutritionist and beef producer. Science and Veterinary Science degrees from Sydney University, Masters and PhD from Queensland University, and a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Ruminant Nutrition. Adjunct Associate Professor with... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:00 - 16:00
Room L3 Adelaide Convention Centre

15:30

MRSA in Australia in humans and animals
Antimicrobial resistance is a complex issue and the effect of MRSA in humans and animals is different in different species and countries. This presentation will help describe the issues associated with MRSA globally and particularly in Australia and discuss what we can do to limit the problem associated with this pathogen

Speakers
JH

Jane Heller

After graduation, Jane worked initially in small animal medicine in private practice, before undertaking an internship and then a Master of Veterinary Clinical Studies at the University of Sydney, where she was ‘switched on’ to Veterinary Epidemiology. Jane then went to the University... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 15:30 - 16:00
Room L2 Adelaide Convention Centre

16:00

High tea
Thursday May 26, 2016 16:00 - 16:30
Foyer Adelaide Convention Centre

16:30

AVA Member Forum
AVA Member Forum - Facilitator James O'Loghlin

Thursday May 26, 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Hall L Adelaide Convention Centre

19:00

Gala Dinner
Panorama Ballroom, Adelaide Convention Centre

Celebrate and enjoy the good times and great company as we visit the era of big bands, swing dance, glitz and glamour.

Delegates and accompanying guests: $180. Non delegates: $295.

Dress: Glitz and Glamour
Kindly sponsored by Guild Insurance

Sponsors
avatar for Guild Insurance

Guild Insurance

Both Guild Insurance and GuildSuper have partnered with the AVA since 1996, providing veterinarians with quality protection in practice. Guild Insurance offer tailored insurance for both veterinarians and their practices. Through chairing a Risk Committee with the AVA and developing... Read More →



Thursday May 26, 2016 19:00 - Friday May 27, 2016 00:00
Social Events
 
Friday, May 27
 

08:00

Australian Cattle Veterinarians (ACV) & Australian Sheep Veterinarians (ASV) Field Trip
Visit farms at Wistow and Kuitpo plus biodynamic cheese factory at Paris Creek (Adelaide Hills) - demonstration of liver biopsy in sheep and cattle plus discussion of holistic approach to soil, pasture and livestock management. Lunch and wine tasting included at Hugh Hamilton Wines, McLaren Vale.
Leaves from and returns to Adelaide Convention Centre. Leaves at 8:00 – be there 7:45 please – Colin Trengove is your Leader for the day.

AVA member: $400
SIG member: $350
AVA student/ new graduate member: $200
Non-member: $800


Friday May 27, 2016 08:00 - 17:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

08:30

Small Animal (ASAVA) – Pathology Workshop
Presented by: Prof.Bruce Parry
Topic 1: Haematology
Topic 2: Cytology

Join these interactive sessions looking at the preparation and examination of blood films and at cytology slides from aspirates, impression smears, washes, etc. from clinical cases of dogs and cats. Using video microscopy, all participants will simultaneously view the same slide. Haematology will cover features such as polychromasia, basophilic stippling, Heinz bodies, spherocytes, schistocytes, haemoparasites, iron deficiency, platelets, left-shifts, toxic changes and leukaemias. Cytology will look at aspirates of cutaneous masses and tissues such as lymph nodes, liver and spleen; body fluids; and lavages/washes.

AVA member: $460
SIG member: $360
Non-member: $920

(limited to 30 delegates only)


Friday May 27, 2016 08:30 - 17:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Equine Veterinarians Australia (EVA) 'Pre-Purchase Examination Workshop'
Whether you conduct an equine pre-purchase examination once a week, or once a month, this workshop is a must for you. You will learn all the tips and techniques for examination, and completion of the official, Guild approved form. This will help you avoid litigation from a disgruntled client.


The following topics will be covered in detail on the day:

The all new EVA - 5 Stage Pre-Purchase Examination video
Pre-Purchase Exam for the Sporthorse, Racehorse and Juvenile
Communication with the Purchaser and Vendor
Reporting abnormal Pre-Purchase findings
Pre-Purchase radiology, endoscopy and drug screening
How to avoid litigation
Interactive panel discussion

Registration for this event will include lunch, morning and afternoon tea, with attendees receiving a comprehensive pack of professionally printed workshop notes

AVA member: $395
SIG member :$295
AVA student or new graduate member: $195
Non-member: $80

Sponsors
avatar for Guild Insurance

Guild Insurance

Both Guild Insurance and GuildSuper have partnered with the AVA since 1996, providing veterinarians with quality protection in practice. Guild Insurance offer tailored insurance for both veterinarians and their practices. Through chairing a Risk Committee with the AVA and developing... Read More →



Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 16:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Australian Veterinary Behaviour Interest Group (AVBIG) “Behaviour Consultations- what, why and how?”
TAFE SA Gilles Plains campus, 33 Blacks Rd, Gilles Plains

Spend a day with Dr Kersti Seksel and Dr Caroline Perrin to learn the theory behind behaviour consultations, watch them in action and gain practical personal experience from the experts. This will be a hands-on interactive event and will give you the confidence and technical savvy to enhance every future consultation. Your clients will notice the difference and thank you for it!

Bus departs from Adelaide Convention Centre at 8.30am and returns at 5pm


AVA member: $250
SIG member: $215
AVA student/new graduate member: $215
Non-member: $500


Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 16:30
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Australia Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS) - Small Animal Dental Extractions and Radiography lab
Companion Animal Health Centre, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy Campus
A full day practical workshop. Simple tooth extraction through to full surgical extraction of multi-rooted teeth in both dogs and cats.
Working in small groups with an expert in the field, this lab will give you the skills and confidence to approach any extraction.
A practical tutorial on how to take and interpret dental radiographs will also be included.
Bus departs from Adelaide Convention Centre at 7.30am and returns at 6.30pm.



AVA member: $1,000
SIG member: $800
AVA student/new graduate member: $800
Non-member: $2,000

Exhibitors
avatar for iM3

iM3

iM3 celebrates 24 years in Veterinary dentistry with an enviable reputation for quality dental products and superior after sales support. We love what we do! We design, build and service all of our equipment. The iM3 name is your guarantee of advanced technology, unique features... Read More →



Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Australian Veterinarians for Animal Welfare and Ethics (AVAWE) Welfare Workshop - 'A Good Life: What does that mean for animals?'
Join members of AVAWE and Professor David Main as we explore what it means for animals to have a 'good life'. The day will include time for active discussion. Participants working with all species encouraged to attend.

AVA member: $150
SIG member: $100
AVA student member/new graduate: $100
Non-member: $300


Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:00

Australian Veterinary Association Practice Management (AVAPM) 'Exclusive Insights Workshop'
A full day of practical ideas and business solutions based on the AVAPM exclusive practice insight tours. From within the context of your business, Tony Thelander and Ron Baker will examine and share with you the winning methods from a variety of successful Australian, United Kingdom and New Zealand practices. And you will take home a “can-do” implementation agenda for your clinic.

AVA member: $539
SIG member :$462
AVA student member:$275
Non-member: $1,078


Friday May 27, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30

Australian Veterinarians in Public Health (AVPH) - One health and the impacts of climate change
One health and the impacts of climate change. This one day workshop will explore the impact of climatic changes on animal health and agriculture, as well the relationship between climate, the environment and disease in the One Health paradigm.


AVA member: $250
SIG member: $200
AVA student member/new graduate member: $150
Non AVA Member: $500


Friday May 27, 2016 09:30 - 16:30
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

09:30

Integrative Veterinarians Australia (IVA) 'The vet and the organic farm: don’t be left outside the farm gate'
‘Tauwitchere” 323 Marks Point Road, Narrung

An insight into the worlds fastest growing agricultural sector. Join us for a unique opportunity to spend the day behind the scenes at an organic dairy farm. Vets will gain practical insight into all aspects of farm management, including preventative healthcare, treating disease, land and pasture management, behaviour and welfare.
Buses depart Adelaide Convention Centre 7.30am and return to Adelaide approximately 6.30pm


AVA member: $380
SIG member :$320
AVA student/new graduate member:$190
Non-member: $760


Friday May 27, 2016 09:30 - 16:30
Workshops & Field Trips Adelaide Convention Centre

10:00

AVA South Australia Division ‘Food, wine, and art in the Adelaide Hills’
Join us for a day in the beautiful Adelaide Hills. Sample some of South Australia’s wonderful wines, explore the Hahndorf historic township, and tour the famous gallery of Hans Heysen.

AVA member/partner/guest: $65
Children: $55
Non-member: $130

Friday May 27, 2016 10:00 - 17:00
Social Events
 
Saturday, May 28
 

09:00

Integrative Veterinarians Australia (IVA) Social day: Coorong Discovery Tour, Meningie SA
A rare opportunity to visit one of South Australia’s magic, secluded places.

(Departs Meningie 9.00am, returns Meningie 4.00pm and then returns to Adelaide 6.30pm)

We will explore by foot and by boat the Coorong area, which includes the lakes and Barrages. The Coorong is where the mighty Murray River enters the sea. As a habitat for numerous species of migratory birds and as a refuge for birds in times of drought, the Coorong is important in a national and international sense. The Coorong is also an archeological site of national importance with middens and burial sites throughout the park, providing evidence of Aboriginal occupation over many thousands of years.
We will visit points of interest including the barrages and take a boat across to the Coorong Sandhills. We will walk across to the Southern Ocean. The area has controversial seal populations recently inhabiting this area.

Tour includes morning and afternoon tea and a picnic lunch

Other information: Perfect for those doing our farm gate tour the day before, as Meningie is the town right by the organic farm.
Overnight accommodation required in Meningie the night before tour (Friday night). Delegates should book their own accomodation. Contact the co-ordinator for options.

Buses will pick people up in Meningie at 9am to begin the tour. Buses depart from Meningie at 4pm and return to Adelaide approx. 6.30pm


AVA member: $200
SIG Partner/Guest: $180
AVA student or new graduate member: $100
Non-member: $400

Saturday May 28, 2016 09:00 - 16:00
Social Events